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Shaking The Tree

Updated April 30, 2001

About Our Family Research


Hello!

I have been researching my family history for more than 10 years now.
I started with my living relatives and by using the Church of Latter Day Saints fro research.

I have uncovered many lost links. My hope is that you will share your stories as I share mine and together, we can shake the old tales and merry sould out of that Family Tree.

I have researched several family surnames. The Green, Bessard, Perkins, Kyles, and Mammen families.

THE SHANKLE FAMILY STORY

SHANKLEVILLE, TEXAS. Shankleville is near Clear Creek two miles southwest of Burkeville between State highways 63 and 87, sixty-five miles north of Beaumont in north central Newton County. The community was named for former slaves Jim and Winny Shankle. Jim was born in Kentucky in 1811, Winny in Tennessee three years later. They were separated when Winny's owners moved from Mississippi to Texas, taking Winny and her three children. Jim later stole away and followed them to the Lone Star State. According to legend, Winny's owner discovered Jim in hiding and arranged to buy him from his former master. The Shankles had six children in Texas, born between 1846 and 1859.

Jim became a farmer after emancipation and accumulated $200 in real and $125 in personal property by 1870. Although Winny died in 1883 and Jim in 1888, Shankleville continued to be a center for blacks living in the Newton-Burkeville area. Over the years the community has been the site of a sawmill, a gristmill, and a cotton gin. One of Winny's daughters, Mary, married Stephen McBride, who established McBride College in Shankleville, which operated from 1883 to 1909. The community in 1976 had three churches, two cemeteries, and about fifty families.


THE BRADFORD(Mammen)HISTORY
William Bradford: Governor of Plymouth Colony

William Bradford, the second governor of Plymouth colony elected to fill the place of the deceased John Carver, was responsible for the infant colony's success through great hardships. The Pilgrims were part of a strain of Puritanism known as Separatism, which denoted the aim to completely secede from the Church of England. The Pilgrims held to a Congregational rather than a Presbyterian form of church government.

Not all of the Plymouth colony were Christians, however, and some spoke of using their liberty in defiance of the Pilgrims. Unless they could be held together in unity there was little hope they would survive. The success of the Plymouth was based on covenantalism - the belief that men could form compacts or covenants in the sight of God as a basis for government without the consent of a higher authority. The church of the Pilgrims was already bound by a strict mutual covenant. But to include those outside of the church, a civil compact was drawn up - the constitution and foundation of a Christian democratic republic in the New World.

The Mayflower Compact acknowledged the right of everyone who signed it to share in the making and administering of laws and the right of the majority to rule. It was the constitution of a pure democracy, the principle of Congregational church government applied to the state. This was all the law they had for several years. It worked because they chose Christians as their leaders and all understood that they were to be self-governing under the moral law of God.

If you have any information related to the afore mentioned names, please feel free to e-mail me at Jmammen@mn.mediaone.net

 
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