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The McOmie's 'Scots in America'

Updated June 14, 2002

About Our Family Research


From the Highland hills of Glenshee Scotland to the desert prairie land of Salt Lake City the line of McOmie's can be traced. Much of the research involved in this endeavor can be documented in large part thanks to the LDS Church and its history of record keeping in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prior to that time much of the history of the family in Scotland during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is by word of mouth passed down through tales and legends. That's not to say some of these stories did not happen, however, over time some may have seen a few adjectives added here and there.

The history of the family is a very colorful one to say the least and the sheer determination of our ancestors going back some 400 years is most impressive.

Its often said that you can't know where you are going if you don't know where you've been and these words truly do ring true once you start a project like this.

In reading some of the journal entries, etc., I've often found my mind wandering back in time to those harsh elements and unforeseen moments our ancestors faced. It has occurred to me that faith had to be a large part of their make-up for without it I can't imagine that they would have made the journey. Thanks to them those of us who've benefited from our American heritage have much to be grateful for.

Over the last several years I have been looking at my own family history and gaining a perspective of what my ancestors lives were like. Because of this I have come to the conclusion that before we can look to the future we have to understand the road we have traveled. Without some reasonable understanding of our past, we have no identity. A tree without roots does not flourish; it falls in the first great gale. So too with a family.

History cannot be confined in some neat four-sided box. History is no more than bearing witness to that which has gone before us. It knows no boundaries. It is simply the distillation of the human experience, told one to the other, the old to the young.

A family needs all of its members - the young, the not so young and the old. As I have discovered, we are all of us, fellow travelers in time. We may occupy the same geographic spot, but we each view it differently. The America I know is as different from my fathers as it is from my grown son and daughters. But for a brief time our paths cross and there is time when one can pass on knowledge to the other.

I state unequivocally it is the duty of the old to pass on their knowledge to the next generations. And it is the duty of those generations to seek out, listen and respect that knowledge. That is living, breathing history.

Nor, by the way, is it a one-way street. The mechanism of understanding is always a two-way process and the upside result of that process is called 'mutual respect'.

In conclusion I must say that the historical process of searching the family tree is one of perspective, in the endeavor one finds that roots are planted on a daily basis. The future is the product of the decisions that we make today and those decisions are based on what we have learned from yesterday.

The greatest gift we can give to anyone is our time, for in the end, we find that time was all we ever really had to spend.

 
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Related Files
  • Scottish Roots (10 KB)
    The history of Clan MacThomas in Glenshee and it's legendary 7th chief John McComie (sometimes known as Iain Mor).
  • John McComie's Journey (13 KB)
    Follow the day by day account of the wagon train as it winds its way across the prairie lands of America in 1860.
 
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