The U.S. Census Collection Helps Find Ancestors:

"I recently used my Genealogy.com membership to search for Emma J. Anderson in the U.S. Census. I wasn't sure how much luck I would have because hers is such a common surname. Immediately, I found a link to Emma J. Anderson in the 1900 Census. I clicked on the link and watched as the census page downloaded — I couldn't believe it! Not only did I find Emma, but her sister Anna as well! I also found Anna's future husband living next door! The page also listed the names of Anna's children, AND her future husband's family! It was a goldmine! My hours of online searching had paid off!"

Rachael Anderson
Middletown, Connecticut


"My father died when I was young and his parents passed away long before I was born, so I never knew my father's family. I'd been told that one of my great grandfathers was named Bill Simmons and that he was probably from Kentucky or Pennsylvania.

Based on the dates that I knew (my grandmother's birth date — 1898), I figured he'd be alive in 1900 so I used Genealogy.com's U.S. Census subscription to see if I could find him and grandmother. Sure enough, after searching on William Simmons in the index I found my grandmother's family in just a few minutes. I linked right to the census page and discovered not only the town and county they lived in, but the street they lived on and who their neighbors were.

With the census information printed and in hand, I learned that my great grandmother's name was Francis and that she'd married my great grandfather in 1881 at the age of 21. Armed with these clues I was able to track down their marriage record in Genealogy Library and discovered another family surname (the Shorts) to explore. Best of all, I learned the names of my grandmother's 6 siblings (one had apparently died young) and was able to track down cousins still living in Kentucky who'd descended from this family — my family. We swapped information and my tree has grown as a result.

Thank you Genealogy.com for making my research faster and easier than I ever imagined it could be."

John Halford   
Abilene, Texas