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Descendants of Johann Van Weede

Generation No. 3


3. JOHAN3 VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT (DELIANA2 VAN WEEDE, JOHANN1) was born September 14, 1547 in Amersfoort,Utrecht,Holland, and died May 13, 1619 in Beheaded in The Binnenhof at the Hague, Holland. He married MARIA VAN UTRECHT Abt. 1575, daughter of ADRIAEN PLAS and MAGDELENA UTRECHT. She was born Abt. 1552 in Utrecht, Holland, and died March 19, 1628/29.

Notes for J
OHAN VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT:
John Studied Law at Bourges, in Belgium, Louvain, in France, Heidelburg, in Germany, and in Italy. After his studies, he practiced law as Advocate in Holland and Zeeland. He was an early defender of civil rights and religious freedom. During his studies, he was exposed to Calvinism, and never agreed to the extreme theory of predestination.

During the overthrow of the ruling Spanish government, John served as a volunteer in the attempted relief of Haarlem, and fought in the seige of Leyden. John was rewarded in 1577 for his effort as a pensionary of Rotterdam.

In 1579, John was active in the Union of Utrecht, which became the foundation of the Commonwealth, being joined later by 7 northern provinces.

In 1585, John was sent to England and France as the ambassador from Holland, offering both countries the sovereignty and protection ofHolland. Both refused, but Queen Elizabeth of England did agree to help against the Spanish.

1586 found John appointed Land's Advocate of Holland. He became the leading statesman of the United Provinces; and with Maurice, Stadtholder and Captain General, strengthened the Republic internally and internationally. John provided financial and political means for Maurice's achievemants in the following years. John was appointed as Advocate and Keeper of the Great Seal, and as such, was virtually Prime Minister, President, Attorney General, Finance Minister, and
Minister of Foreign Affairs for the whole Republic.

The Spanish Armada was defeated in 1588, opening the way for Dutch, French, and English colonization of North America uncontested by the powerful Spanish Navy. The invasion of Flanders, an effort to drive out the Spanish, was a disaster, and a major mistake for John.

John helped form the Dutch East Indies Co. in 1602. In 1609, the 12 Years Truce was signed with Spain, supported by John, opposed by Maurice and the Reformed Church. The Reformed Church opposed the treaty based on the Calvinist seal against property and gain. The opposition grew as slander claimed him a traitor and favoring the Catholics. People who had honored him began to turn on him. John tried to limit the political and religious conflict by refusing to allow the the national synod to meet in 1614.

John tendered his resignation from office -it was refused. In 1618, the religious conflict worsened with the attempt of Maurice and others to make Calvinism the official state religion. The Synod of Dort, 1618, allowed this to happen. John was
a believer that all religions should be tolerated within the state. Because of this stand and the Truce with Spain, John was illegally arrested 29 Aug. 1618, without charges being made, and with no defense attorney allowed, nor was he allowed to put his own defense in writing, no notes, no books, no evidence. There was no indictment, no arguement for either the prosecution or defense, and no testimony. John's verbal defense was called his confession.

He was hanged 13 May 1619. The formal entry made in the register of the States of Holland of his execution lists him as, " Mr. John of Barneveld, in his life Knight, Lord of Berkel, Rodenrys - Advocate of Holland and West Friesland". He had served his country as Advocate for 33 years, 2 months, and 5 days.

MARIA: Maria was the illegitimate daughter of Magdelena Jans Van Utrecht,
but was adopted by her step father 14 Nov. 1575, shortly before her marriage.

some info obtained off of the Internet: wysiwyg://555/http://genforum.genforum.genealogy.com/stoutengurg/messages/2.html from John Warfield Reeves:

Pieter's daughter, Jannetje, married Albertus Philipzen Ringo in 1679.

The most interesting thing I want to tell you is that William's father, Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt, was beheaded in 1619 in the Hague but was later considered a
hero and his statue stands in The Hague today! I just learned this and would like to learn more, such as why did his son have a different last name.

The following was copied from typed sheets from Annamay Batty:
Johan was a Knight and was Lord of Berkel, Rodenrys and Stoutenburg as well
as Pensionary of Holland (Advocaat).

Oldenbarneveldt was a son of Gerard or Gerald Van Stoutenburg and Delianna Van Weede. They most likely were born in and around the 1520's and had at least one other son, Elias. He became pensionary of Rotterdam when Oldenbarneveldt went on to higher political endeavor.

Johan was educated at Louvain, Bourges and Heidelberg, studying law. He also traveled in France and Italy. He practiced law at the Hague. Johan is listed as a Dutch statesman, born at Amersfoort on Sept. 14, 1547. He spoke several languages and became a moderate Calvinist. He was a zealous adherent of William the Silent of Holland.

He served militarily, as a volunteer for the relief of Haarlem (1573) and again at Leyden (1574). He married Maria Van Utrecht in 157555. In 1576, he became pensionary of Rotterdam, and was active in promoting the Union of Utrecht in 1579. After William the Silent's assassination, it was Oldenbarneveldt who persuaded others in power to elect a very young Maurice of Nassau as stadholder, Captain-General and Admiral of Holland. During the Duke of Leicester (Robert Dudley, favorite of Queen Elizabeth I of England) and the Spanish Duke of Parma's attempt to govern Holland, Oldenberneveldt made himself very useful in preventing the destruction of the United Provinces.

While Spain stumbled clumsily up the English Channel in an attempt to invade England, that gave Oldenbarneveldt thime to quiet civil strife at home. We all have heard about the defeat of the Spanish Armada and what that meant to England, but it was also a great boon to the United States of The Netherlands. From 1587 on, Johan's diplomatic efforts kept Holland in
In 1598 he took part in special embassies to Henry IV of France and Elizabeth I of England and again in 1605 in a special mission sent to gongratulate James I on his accession. His sons-in-law were ambassadors to France and Venice, while his youngest son, William, was in the French King's service sometime before 1610. This old gentleman did get around. When he personally needed help, however, no heads of state came to his rescue.

Prince Maurice of Nassau had been a friend (confidant) as well as being mentored by Johan Van Oldenbarneveldt. So what happened after 1609 was truly unwarrented. Maurice, ever a warrior, wanted to continue fighting with Spain and Johan, always th diplomat wanted a truce. Oldenbarneveldt got his wish and there was a 12 year peace with Spain and general accord within the fast growing merchant class, thanks in part to the Dutch East India Co., which Oldenberneveldt influenced heavily. Their political enmity grew and became a religious difference which in turn, became again political.

The theological/political debate seems to have been that Johan favored provincial sovereignty and the right to individual beliefs while Maurice wanted to maintain government uniformity of religion. There was even a military involvement in trying to settle this dispute. No one was killed in this show of arms, but Oldenbarneveldt, Grotius and a man named Hoogerbeets were imprisoned. Grotius eventually staged a rather spectacular escape and became the author of a meritime law which still is in use.

Johan was not so lucky. His family was certain that he would be acquited of all charges since he had been, in reality, the one person who held Holland together under dire circumstance. There was a packed court as to his guilt as a traitor to
his country and since he wasn't allowed any legal representation, he defended himself without benefit of notes or papers of any kind.

The "Kangaroo Court" condemned him and he was villified in the press of the day. He was nearly 72 when he was beheaded at the Banenhauf in the Hague.
His last letters to his family are famous and there is a painting done by Josef Israels depicting "Barneveldt's Last Letter" (done in 1852). (The man depicted on the right in this painting, is supposed to be William Van Stoutenburg.) The execution took place in 1619.

The story is just about to begin. Europe was in a state of chaos. (Although I haven't read of a time when there wasn't a war someshere at sometime in Europe since the beginning of time.) Oldenbarneveldt's two sons, Pieter (Reinier) and William, the Stoutenburg brothers, (Pieter was called Lord Groenwald and William was Lord Stoutenburg) decided to avenge their father's death by staging a "coup" and kill Maurice of Nassau.

It was an ill conceived plan at best and may not have gotten much beyond the pub-room planning stage. Authorities did find out about the plot and sent out a warrant for the brothers' arrest. If they hadn't been so hasty in their bar-room treachery, they both would have lived and Maurice would have been dead within two years anyway. Our family story would possibly be a very different one today as well.

From "The Life and Death of John of Barneveldt, Advocate of Holland, with a view of the Primary causes and Movements of the Thirty Years' War by John Lothrop Motley. Corresponding member of the Institute of France. Publishers: Harper & Brothers of New York & London, 1900, 17 Volumes

Vol. 1, Page #13: Born in Amersfoort 1547, of the ancient and knightly house of Olden-Barnevelt. A native of Utrech.

Page #16: Brother, Elias Barnveldt, succeeded John as Pensionary of Rotterdam

Page #33: Barnevelt was tall and majestic of presence with large quadangular face, austre blue eyes, looking authoratative and commanding. He had a vast forehead and a grizzled beard.

Page #38-39: Van de Myle, son-in-law of Barnevelt was ambassador to Venice.

Page # 81-82: Daughter of De Maldere, a leading statesman of Zealand and Barnevelt's second son were asked to make a match by King Henry IV.

Page # 190-191: His eldest son, Reinier, Seignior of Groeneveldt, had been knighted by Henry IV; his yongest, William, afterward called Seignior of Stoutenburg, but at his moment bearing the not very mellifuous title of Craimgepolder, was a gentleman-in-waiting at the King's Court, with a salary of three thousand crowns a year----was a turbulent, extravgant, pleasure loving youth---always in debt---gambled. He was M. de Caimgepolder later to be known as Willem of Barneveldt while in the service of the King.

Page #192: Barneveldt's 2 sons-in-law, Brederode, Seignior Van Veenhuizen and Cornelis Van der Myle. Van der Myle was first ambassador to the Venetian Republic and head of the Embessy to France.

Page #226: First mention of French East India Company

Vol II, Page #232: Barneveldt's name and interest were identified with the great East India Company which was now powerful and prosperous. Barneveldt opposed formation of the West india Company.

Page #255: Barneveldt's son-in-law, Seignior van Venhuizen, was president of the Chief Court.

Vol III, Page #12-15: "In the year 1575, I married my wife", he said.

Page #266: Widow of Barneveldt: Maria van Utrecht. They had 2 sons and 2 daughters.

Page #267: Eldest son, Reinier, Lord of Groeneveld married Madame de Brandwyk, a widow of rank and wealth.

Page #268: The Younger son, Willem, Lord of Stoutenburg, married Walburg de Marnix.

Page #266-293: States Johan of Barneveldt was executed on Monday, 13th May,
1619. Four years later, 1623 a scheme on paper was drawn up to murder Maurice. Reinier was later executed and Willem escaped and fled Holland.

Johan van Oldenbarnevelt
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Johan van Oldenbarnevelt (September 14, 1547 - May 13, 1619) was a Dutch statesman, who played an important role in the Dutch struggle for independence from Spain.

Born in Amersfoort, Van Oldenbarnevelt studied law at several universities throughout Europe before settling in The Hague. Although just a moderate Calvinist, he supported William the Silent in his revolt against Spain, and fought in William's army.

He was a fierce opponent of the policies of the Earl of Leicester, the governor-general at the time, and instead favoured Maurice of Nassau, a son of William. Leicester left in 1587, leaving the military power in the Netherlands to Maurice.

In 1586, Van Oldenbarnevelt was made Land's Advocate of the province of Holland, an office he held for 32 years. Holland being the most important province of the Dutch Republic, and Van Oldenbarnevelt being a very able policitian, he became one of the most powerful men in the country.

On April 9, 1609, Van Oldenbarnevelt managed to negotiate a truce with Spain, much against the will of his former protege Maurice, even though the deal was favourable to the Netherlands.

The relationship between the two became worse when they ended up in opposing camps in an ongoing religious conflict in the Netherlands. Van Oldenbarnevelt supported the more libertine Arminians (or Remonstrants), while Maurice gave his support to the strict Calvinist Gomarists (or Contra-Remonstrants).

When Van Oldenbarnevelt proposed several measures which de facto called for independence of the province of Holland from the rest of the Republic, Maurice intervened, and Van Oldenbarnevelt was arrested on August 23, 1618 on accusation of treason.

A show trial followed, in which no real evidence was presented and in which several judges were known political enemies of Van Oldenbarnevelt, he was sentenced to death. He was executed at the Binnenhof in The Hague.


Oldenbarnevelt , Johan van
Britannica Concise

born Sept. 14, 1547, Amersfoort, Spanish Netherlands
died May 13, 1619, The Hague, Neth.

Dutch statesman and a founding father of Dutch independence.

A lawyer in the province of Holland, he helped William I negotiate the Union of Utrecht (1579). Appointed “great pensionary” of Holland, he mobilized Dutch resources for the military goals of Maurice of Nassau. As foreign secretary of the Union's seven provinces, he negotiated a triple alliance with France and England against Spain (1596). He later concluded the Twelve Years' Truce with Spain (1609), which reaffirmed Holland's dominant role in the republic. In 1617 he sided with the moderate Arminians in religious strife against the stricter Calvinists (known as Counter-Remonstrants) and Prince Maurice; he was arrested in 1618, convicted of religious subversion, and beheaded.

"Maurice, Prince of Orange"
2000-12-01 until 2001-03-18
Rijksmuseum
Amsterdam, , NL


This will be the first exhibition devoted to this important figure in Dutch history. In 2000 it will be exactly 400 years since the Battle of Nieuwpoort. On display will be a great many personal mementoes of Maurice (1567-1625): great battles, suits of armour in gold, superb portraits, exotic animals, maps and sea charts and richly illustrated manuscripts. His importance as a military commander and in the fields of domestic and international politics, court life and overseas expansion will be highlighted.


Stadholder and prince
Prince Maurice, the son of William of Orange and Anna of Saxony, was born at Castle Dillenburg in Germany. He was brought up there as well because of the war in the Low Countries and the seizing of his older half brother Philip Willem in Louvain by the Duke of Alva. At the age of seventeen he succeeded his murdered father as stadholder of the provinces of Holland and Zeeland. A few years later he became stadholder of Overijssel, Utrecht and Gelderland. He surrounded himself by nobles, artists, men of genius, administrators and political allies at various levels of government, of whom Grand Pensionary Johan van Oldenbarnevelt was one of the best known. Portraits of family members such as William of Orange and his children and portraits of Maurice at different ages by artists like Van den Queeborn, Goltzius and Van Mierevelt will be brought together at the exhibition for the first time.

Sumptuous court life
Maurices court, located in the stadholders quarters at the Binnenhof in The Hague, was one of the principal power centres in the Dutch Republic. Maurices titles, his office of stadholder and his military victories made him a man of high international standing. Moreover, his inclusion in 1613 in the Order of the Garter and the title of Prince of Orange which he was allowed to adopt after the death of his brother Philip Willem in 1618 gave him the status of a ruler. He deliberately presented himself as such through his purchases of splendid works of art, the sumptuous clothes of his courtiers and his exotic menagerie. A ceremonial suit of armour in gold made for the Prince of Wales from the Royal Armouries Collection in London and a silver ewer and dish by Adam van Vianen will be in the exhibition. There will also be superb portraits of Maurice in his princely finery by the court artists Van de Venne and De Gheyn. Maurice was a great lover of horses, which he called his favourite courtiers. De Gheyn painted a life-sized portrait of the most famous horse and this will be on display.

Maurices taste for martial art and for art which reflected his love of mathematics is evident from the many examples of landscape gardening, fencing, architecture, cartography and perspective in the exhibition. Particularly striking are the beautifully calligraphed journals that formed part of his bookkeeping. These volumes dating from 1604 and decorated with his arms were only discovered during the preparations for this exhibition and will be seen for the first time.

The philanderer
Maurice had a formidable reputation as a ladies man. He had a long-term relationship with Margaretha van Mechelen, but never married her. They had three love children who were brought up at court as nobles. Margaretha had houses in Rijswijk and The Hague near to the stadholders quarters and Maurices stud farm. In 1625 the artist Esaias van de Velde recorded the courts visit to the fair and the new stables in Rijswijk. This rarely seen painting from the Six collection will be shown at the exhibition. Outside his relationship with the Lady of Mechelen, Maurice had five children by five other women. The proof of this, including an account with receipts for the maintenance of the five illegitimate children not of noble birth, will be on view. There is also a poem by Hugo de Groot in which he complains about the fate of Margaretha van Mechelen.

The man of genius
The birth of the Dutch Republic and its economic growth during the 17th century cannot be separated from the figure of Maurice. As commander of the army and the fleet, he introduced revolutionary changes in the way war was waged. The quality of the army improved and the Spanish came under increasing pressure from the Republics war machine. The Battle of Nieuwpoort on 4 July 1600 was the culmination of Maurices work and made him a hero of international stature. Maurices systematic approach, together with his cousin and brother-in-law Willem Lodewijk, the founding of educational institutions and his special encouragement of the development of instruments and the publication of books led to a rapid growth of confidence in the economic potential of the Republic. The Dutch thought of Maurice as the greatest of the men of genius and it was said that with the aid of a miraculous telescope he could see things that remained hidden from others. Playthings like the sail-wagon and the technique of scooping out peat became symbols for the Dutch who could sail over land and make fire from water. Examples will be on view in the exhibition.

The world conqueror
Through his position as commander of the army and the fleet, his stadholderate and his aristocratic status, Maurice played a prominent part in the foreign policy of the Republic. Commercial interests and warfare often go hand in hand. Many unusual mementoes of the European and overseas expansion will be on display, such as mounted cassowaries, an original letter from Maurice to the Sultan of Atjeh, and krisses, necklaces, loin cloths, etc. from the collection of the then celebrated Dr Paludanus of Enkhuizen.

Enemy of Van Oldenbarnevelt
Maurices pursuit of power was not approved of by eveyone. His determination to continue the war against Spain was opposed above all by the Holland merchants who wanted peace in the interests of trade. The spokesman for the critics was Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, Grand Pensionary of the powerful province of Holland and leader of the Holland delegation in the States-General. Once the truce with Spain was concluded, domestic political issues could be fought over. The differences centred on foreign policy, the relation between church and state and the autonomy of the provinces. Two parties came into being: the Remonstrants with Van Oldenbarnevelt and the Counter-Remonstrants with Maurice. In the end Maurice won and Van Oldenbarnevelt was beheaded.

Maurice himself died in 1625. In his last years he had little success. In 1625 Breda and Bahia de Todos los Sanctos in Brazil were lost. Paintings of these events by Pieter Snayers and Andries van Eertvelt will be on show. The exhibition ends with memories, among them an impressive drawing by Jacques de Gheyn II done immediately after Maurice had breathed his last.

Maurice, Prince of Orange is the last exhibition to be held in 2000 to mark the 200th anniversary of the Rijksmuseum.


1588 - The Republic of the United Provinces

In 1588 the Republic of the United Provinces consisted of the seven sovereign provinces of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Friesland, Groningen, Overijssel and Gelderland, the most powerful being Holland. Each of the provinces elected a Stadholder. The office of Stadholder had originally been intended for the King of Spain's representative or proxy but under the Republic the Stadholder became the servant of the States and an entirely new form of government came into being. This was headed by the States General, which was made up of representatives of the seven sovereign provinces and met in The Hague. Because unanimity was required in voting on matters relating to defence and taxation, and because such issues had to be debated by the provincial assemblies first, it was difficult for the States General to act decisively and decision-making was subject to long delays. Each of the provinces also had a paid legal adviser or 'Pensionary', known in Holland as the Advocate. These were influential officials, especially in a powerful province like Holland, since they acted as spokesmen for their provinces in the States General and also as intermediaries between the States and foreign powers. Johan van Oldenbarnevelt and Johan de Witt were the most influential of these Advocates or Grand Pensionaries, as they were later called.

Following the departure of the Earl of Leicester in 1587, the situation seemed desperate. He took with him the troops under his command and the States were left to rely wholly on their own resources. Moreover, the might of Spain seemed about to subjugate Protestant England through the efforts of the Armada, backed by the land-based forces of the Duke of Parma. However, the expedition was a disaster. Admiral Justinus van Nassau was able to prevent Parma's army from joining forces with the Spanish fleet and the English navy was able, with the assistance of ships from Zeeland and Holland, to smash the 'invincible' Armada. Further decimated by storms, the remaining ships sailed north round Scotland to limp home to Spain. Of the original 130 ships, only about 80 survived. This triumph over Catholic Spain won the Protestant states great respect in Europe.

With the help of the political strategist Oldenbarnevelt, William of Orange's son Maurice improved the organisation of resistance to Spain. He reorganised the army and introduced new techniques of warfare. Oldenbarnevelt provided him with the necessary funding by uniting the States and promoting Maurice as the new Stadholder. Leicester, who had come from England to help defend the provinces against the Spanish but then usurped more and more power, certainly helped to encourage the development of Oldenbarnevelt's political genius and the growth of unity within the States. Maurice's greatest successes were the capture of Breda in 1590, when he smuggled 68 young men into the town in the hold of a ship carrying peat, and the defeat of the Spaniards at Nieuwpoort in 1600. His closest military associate was William Louis, Count of Nassau and Stadholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe.

Johan van Oldenbarnevelt

Johan van Oldenbarnevelt ( September 14 , 1547 - May 13 , 1619 ) was a Dutch statesman, who played an important role in the Dutch struggle for independence from Spain .

Born in Amersfoort , Van Oldenbarnevelt studied law at several universities throughout Europe before settling in The Hague . Although just a moderate Calvinist , he supported William the Silent in his revolt against Spain , and fought in William's army.

He was a fierce opponent of the policies of the Earl of Leicester , the governor-general at the time, and instead favoured Maurice of Nassau , a son of William. Leicester left in 1587 , leaving the military power in the Netherlands to Maurice.

In 1586 , Van Oldenbarnevelt was made Land's Advocate of the province of Holland , an office he held for 32 years. Holland being the most important province of the Dutch Republic, and Van Oldenbarnevelt being a very able policitian, he became one of the most powerful men in the country.

On April 9 , 1609 , Van Oldenbarnevelt managed to negotiate a truce with Spain, much against the will of his former protege Maurice, even though the deal was favourable to the Netherlands.

The relationship between the two became worse when the two ended up in opposing camps in an ongoing religious conflict in the Netherlands. Van Oldenbarnevelt supported the more libertine Arminians (or Remonstrants), while Maurice gave his support to the strict Calvinist Gomarists (or Contra-Remonstrants).

When Van Oldenbarnevelt proposed several measures which de facto called for independence of the province of Holland from the rest of the Republic, Maurice intervened, and Van Oldenbarnevelt was arrested on August 23 , 1618 on accusation of treason.

A show trial followed, in which no real evidence was presented and in which several judges were known political enemies of Van Oldenbarnevelt, he was sentenced to death. He was executed at the Binnenhof in The Hague .




More About J
OHAN VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT:
Occupation: Statesman
     
Children of J
OHAN VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT and MARIA VAN UTRECHT are:
  i.   MARIA JOHANNA PETROCELLA4 VAN OLDENBARNEVELD, b. February 09, 1581/82, Rotterdam, Holland; d. February 23, 1656/57.
  Notes for MARIA JOHANNA PETROCELLA VAN OLDENBARNEVELD:
One of the daughters was married to Corneliue van der Myle, who was head of the Dutch Embassy in France and later Ambassador to Venice. The other daughter married Walraven Brederode, Lord of Veenhuzed, who also held important ambassadorships.

  ii.   REINIER "PIETER" VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT, b. 1588, Rotterdam, Holland; d. May 29, 1627, Hague, Holland; m. MADAME DE BRANDWYCK.
  Notes for REINIER "PIETER" VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT:
Reinier was knighted by King Henry IV of France. He was also head forested of
Delfland until his father's death. Reinier was even tempered and popular with the public, but was easily led by his strong-willed brother, William. It was Reinier who supplied the funds for the conspiracy to kill Maurice. When he was caught, he seemingly knew little of the details of the plot, but readily admitted that he supplied the money. His trail was short and he was beheaded as were the thirteen others who were involved.

He was reported to have had 2 small sons at the time ofhis father's death. The
names of his children are not known.

Another date of death is May 29, 1623 in 's-Gravenhage Zuid-Holland.

  More About REINIER "PIETER" VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT:
Occupation: Head Forester, Knight

4. iii.   WILLEM (WILLIAM) S. VAN OLDENBARNEVELDT, b. November 12, 1590, Gravenhage, Holland; d. May 29, 1623, Brussels, Belgium.
  iv.   GEERTRUID VAN OLDENBARNEVELD, b. September 23, 1579, Rotterdam, Holland; d. June 25, 1623, 's-Gravenhage Zuid, Holland.
  v.   JAN V AN OLDENBARNEVELD, b. February 11, 1576/77, Delft, Holland.



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