The Descendants of of John O'Brien Sr.

 

 

 

 

 First Generation

 

 

      1.  John1 O'BRIEN SR was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1760.  John died after 1826. 

 

      John's occupation: Farmer.  John O'Brien was listed in the Tithe Applotment Book of Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish on 4 June 1826. At this time he was living in the Townland of Killernan with 4 acres and 1 Rod of land. John paid 1 shilling and 3 1/4 pence a year for the tithes of that part of the parish to the Established Protestant Church regardless of his religion. This land was rated at one half the tithe because of the poor quality of the land and was payable to the Right Honorable the Earl of Egremont or to William Casey, Esquire as his lessee. His immediate neighbors were his sons: Patrick O'Brien, 3 acres and 3 rods; John O'Brien, 2 acres; Michael O'Brien, 10 acres, James O'Brien, 10 acres; and Daniel O'Brien 6 acres and 3. rods. These properties were consolidated into two farms by 1855 when they were listed in Sir Richard Griffith's Primary Valuation of Tenements. This was undertaken in County Clare in 1855. This was to determine the amount of tax each tenant should pay towards the support of the poor and destitute within his Poor Law Union. This Valuation forms the basis of the present-day rating system in Ireland today. John's sons, Michael O'Brien and James O'Brien were the heads of farms after the consolidation. What ever happened to their brothers and their families is not known at this time. Ireland was ravaged by the famine from 1845 through 1851. Death from starvation and emigration out of Ireland numbered in the millions during this time period. There are not any civil vital statistic records for this time period and the church records only account for a few baptism records to support our research.  His wife's name is not known.

 

Barony of Ibrickane A barony on the coast of co. Clare, Munster. It is bounded, on the north, by Corcomroe; on the east, by Inchiquin, Islands, and Clonderalaw; on the south, by Moyarta; and on the west, by the Atlantic. Its greatest length south-south-westward is 15 miles; its greatest breadth, in the opposite direction, is 8; and its area is 57,028 acres, 8 perches, of which 598 acres, 1 rood, 9 perches are water. The southern part is almost all bog; and the northern part is a mixture of very deteriorated argillaceous arable land with pastoral uplands and very improveable moorish hills. On the north-east boundary is Mount Callan; and off the coast are Mutton and Enniskerry Islands. The chief marine indentation is Doonbeg bay; and while nearly all the coast is bold and iron-bound, some portions of it exhibit highly-imposing scenery. This barony contains part of the parish of Kilmacduane, and the whole of the parishes of Kilfarboy, Killard, and Kilmurray, the town of Miltown-Malbay, and the villages of Doonbeg, Kilmurray, and Mullagh. Pop., in 1831, 20,451; in 1841, 25,186. Houses 3,912. Families employed chiefly in agriculture, 3,411; in manufactures and trade, 668; in other pursuits, 243. Males at and above 5 years of age who could read and write, 3,267; who could read but not write, 864; who could neither read nor write, 6,810. Females at and above 5 years of age who could read and write, 1,092; who could read but not write, 885; who could neither read nor write, 8,888. Ibrickane is partly in the Poor-law union of Ennistymon, and partly in that of Kilrush. The total number of tenements valued is 2,697; and of these, 1,397 were valued under £5, - 801, under £10, - 265, under £15, - 94, under £20, - 60, under £25, - 21, under £30, - 25, under £40, - 12, under £50, - and 22, at and above, £50.

 

The Parliamentary Gazeteer of Ireland, 1845 Courtesy of Clare Local Studies Project

 

Kilmurry-Ibrickane Map of Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish showing Townlands

 

A parish in the barony of Ibrickane, 2¾ miles west by south of Milltown-Malbay, Co. Clare, Munster. It contains the villages of Mullagh and Kilmurry-Ibrickane. Length and breadth, exclusive of islands, respectively 8 miles and 4½; area, 25,857 acres, 3 roods, 28 perches,—of which 331 acres, 2 roods, 20 perches are in Lough Doo, 40 acres, 2 roods, 29 perches are in small lakes, and 160 acres, 1 rood, 12 perches are in sea-girt islands. Pop., in 1831, 8,433; in 1841, 10,747. Houses 1,652. Pop. of the rural districts, in 1841, 10,525. Houses 1,614. The parochial surface extends from side to side of the barony, or from the western declivity of Slieve-Callan to the Atlantic ocean; and by far the greater part of it is now a congeries of wild uplands, and now a dreary expanse of bogs, moors, and bleak pasture and arable grounds. Slieve-Callan on the eastern boundary has an altitude of 1,282 feet; Knocknaboley, 2 miles further south, has an altitude of 701 feet; a hill on the south-east corner has an altitude of 700 feet; Lough Doo, 1¼ mile north of the last hill and all within the parish, has an elevation of 281 feet; and the rivulet Annagh, the most northerly of the three streams by which the parish is drained, descends within the parochial limits from an elevation of 509 feet to sea-level. The coast is all rocky and iron-bound; and contains the headlands of Lurga and Caherrush. The principal islands are Enniskerry, Carrickaneetwar, Mattle, and Carricknola. Though several villas and mansional houses are sprinkled over the sea-board, scarcely one clump or belt of wood exists. The village of Kilmurry-Ibrickane stands 1 mile from the sea, and on the road from Milltown-Malbay to Doonbeg. Area, 14 acres. Pop., in 1841, 91. Houses 15. Fairs are held on May 17 and Aug. 25. This parish is a wholly impropriate rectory and vicarage in the dio. of Killaloe; and the vicars of Killara and Kilfarboy often officiate in it gratuitously. The Roman Catholic chapel has an attendance of 800; and is united to the chapel of Kilfarboy. In 1834, the Protestants amounted to 27, and the Roman Catholics to 9,029; and 7 pay daily schools had on their books 248 boys and 113 girls.

 

The Parliamentary Gazeteer of Ireland, 1845 Courtesy of Clare Local Studies Project

 

Back to Parishes e

 

 Historical events during the life of John O'BRIEN Sr: King George III ascended the British throne on October 20, 1760;  New York becomes a state on July 26, 1788;  Jean-Paul Marat assassinated in his bath on July 13, 1793;  Congress convened for its 1st Washington, DC session on November 17, 1800;  to test asbestos, a Frenchman enters an oven wearing an asbestos suit and carrying a steak - the steak gets cooked, the man doesn't on January 15, 1827.

 

     John O'BRIEN Sr had the following children:

 

    +   2     i.      Michael2 O'BRIEN was born circa 1788.

    +   3    ii.      James O'BRIEN was born circa 1793.

         4   iii.      Daniel O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1800.  Daniel died after 1826.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland.  Daniel's occupation: Farmer.

         5   iv.      John O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1800.  John died after 1826.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1800.

    +   6    v.      Patrick O'BRIEN was born circa 1800.


 

 

 

 Second Generation

 

 

      2.  Michael2 O'BRIEN (John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1788.  Michael died 28 February 1864 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 75 years of age. 

 

      Michael's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1788.  Michael O'Brien was listed in the Tithe Applotment Book of Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish 1826. He was responsible for paying tithe on 10 acres of farm land in Killernan townland. His tithe was 2 shillings and 3 1/4 pence. This tithe was rated at one half because of the poor quality of the land in this part of the parish. In the next valuation of property in 1855, the Griffith's Valuation list him as holding a little over 21 acres. The total annual valuation of rateable property was 6 pounds, 5 shillings. This description of the property listed house, office and land. The immediate lessor was Col. George Wyndham. Michael death record lists the cause of death as "old age". He was only sick for one week before he died and James O'Brien was present at his death and recorded the death on March 3, 1864. The information on his death record said he was married at the time of death. At this time I don't have any proof who his wife was but I believe it was Margaret O'Brien who died on a farm in Killernan on May 6, 1871 at 85 years old. Their children were probably born before the start of the Catholic church records which was 1831 for this parish, to years after Catholic emancipation. Margaret's name is not known.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Michael O'BRIEN: New York becomes a state on July 26, 1788;  1st public opinion poll conducted on July 24, 1824;  patent issued for taking & projecting motion pictures to Louis Ducos du Hauron (he never did build such a machine, though) on March 1, 1864.

 

     Michael O'BRIEN had the following child:

 

    +   7     i.      James3 O'BRIEN was born circa 1824.

  

      3.  James2 O'BRIEN (John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1793.  James died 8 March 1845 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 51 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1845 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      He married Honoria BURKE in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1820.  Honoria was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1803.  Honoria died 23 August 1893 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 90 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1893 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      James's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1793.  . not much is known about James O'Brien because he died before the start of civil records. He also died the year of the first potato crop failure. His grave stone is the first vertical stone for the O'Briens in the O'Brien family plot. The first public recording of his name is found in the Tithe Applotment Books for Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish where he is listed as accountable for 10 acres. Sometime between 1826 an 1855 the farm was enlarged to 26 acres, 2 rods, and 35 perches. The immediate lessor was Col George Wyndham and 7 pounds was the total actual valuation of rateable property. The only other record of James is when he and his wife are listed as parents for the baptism of their son, James on 7 Sept 1839. James's gravestone was erected by his son Patrick in Killernan graveyard with the other O'Brien stones. It reads, " Erected by Patrick O'Brien Kilarnan in memory of his father James who died March 8, 1845 aged 52 years and his mother Honor O'Brien nee Burke who died 23 Aug 1893 aged 90 years.

 

He married Honoria Burke, circa 1820, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Born, circa 1803, in Killernan, Co. Clare EIRE. Died, 23 Aug 1893, in Killernan, Co. Clare EIRE. Christened, circa 1803, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare, EIRE. Burial: circa 1893, in Killernan GY, Co. Clare EIRE. Occupation: Farmer's-wife. Honoria was about twenty years old when she was married. She was a neighbor of the O'Brien's and her family had a farm in Killernan townland. Honoria was widowed in 1845 at the beginning of the Irish potato famine. Her  youngest son, Stephen O'Brien was only 5 years old at this time. Her other son Patrick was a member of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) and it was with his help that Honoria was able to keep the family and farm together during these hard times. Hororia turned the Killernan farm over to her son, Stephen in 1886 Honoria lived with her family until she died at 90 years old. Her death record listed her as a farmer's widow and she had rheumatism for two years and had no medical attention at her death. Her grandson, Pat O'Brien recorded the death on September 8, 1893. My grandfather, was very fond of his grandmother, Honoria. He told stories of how in her last years she was just a little old woman and he would light her pipe for her every night and rub whiskey on her sore gums at night. He said this is where he learned to smoke and drink. When she became weaker he would lift her on and off of the commode because she was too feeble. Honoria stayed in the West bedroom of the house. The back of the fireplace was on the inside wall and it kept her warm.  The children slept in a loft above the kitchen.  The boys on one side and the girls on the other.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of James O'BRIEN: Jean-Paul Marat assassinated in his bath on July 13, 1793;  birth of Friedrich Engels, social philosopher on September 28, 1820;  the locomotive was invented on August 7, 1825;  birth of Gottlieb Daimler, automobile pioneer on March 17, 1834;  birth of James Whistler, mama's boy on July 10, 1834;  birth of John D. Rockefeller on July 8, 1839;  birth of Thomas Nast, political cartoonist of late 1800s America on September 27, 1840;  patent granted for the rubber band on March 17, 1845;  Thoreau moves into his shack on Walden Pond on July 4, 1845.

 

     James O'BRIEN and Honoria BURKE had the following children:

 

         8     i.      Patrick3 O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1825.  Patrick died 1 March 1895 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 69 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1895 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1825.  Patrick's occupation: RIC-policeman County Kilkenny, Ireland, 1872.  .  Patrick was 70 years old when he died. His death record states he was a bachelor, police pensioner, the duration of  his illness was 2 months, he died of liver disease, his  brother, Stephen O'Brien was present at his death in Killernan and it was recorded on the 8 March 1895. Patrick  probably joined the Royal Irish Constabulary in the 1840's As was the practice of the British government he was  stationed out side of County Clare in the South East part of Ireland in County Kildare. When Patrick retired from the R.I.C. he moved back to the O'Brien family farm in Killernan, Co. Clare. Living in the house was his brother, Stephen, and Stephen's, his wife, Margaret and their six children. His mother, Honoria was also living there at the time. Patrick was the favorite uncle of Stephen's  children and it was his generosity that helped three of his children to emigrate to the United States and also financed  the marriage of Catherine O'Brien, the oldest niece to the  prominent Ryan family of Dromoher, Co. Clare. Patrick was also responsible for the tombstone in Killernan graveyard for his parents that is still standing tall and proud. This picture was taken of Patrick in the 1870's that his niece, Bridget (Delia) O'Brien took to America with her when she left Ireland in 1896. She then had this picture drawn by an artist at an art studio in a much larger picture format and had it and framed for hanging in her house in Waverly, NY. When Delia moved to Riverside, NY with her daughter, Catherine she took this picture with her and put it in storage in her basement. Sixty years later her daughters, Catherine and Margaret Cahill presented this picture to me and I have it hanging proudly in my home.

    +   9    ii.      Catherine O'BRIEN was born 3 March 1834.

    + 10   iii.      Margaret O'BRIEN was born 1834.

        11   iv.      James O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1839.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1839.  James's baptism was recorded in the Mullagh Church records where it listed him as conditionally baptized. His sponsors were James O'Brien of Killernan and Margaret O'Brien of Killernan. The officiating priest was Father E. P. Barry.   There is not further mention of James and it is presumed that he died at a young age.

        12    v.      William O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 1839.  William was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in Denver, Arapahoe County, Colorado.

    + 13   vi.      Stephen O'BRIEN was born circa 1840.

  

      6.  Patrick2 O'BRIEN (John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1800.  Patrick died after 1846. 

 

      He married Honor O'BRIEN before 1846.  Honor was born circa 1810.  Honor died after 1846. 

 

      He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1800.

 

 Historical events during the life of Patrick O'BRIEN: Congress convened for its 1st Washington, DC session on November 17, 1800;  the Oregon Spectator becomes the 1st newspaper published on the west coast on February 5, 1846;  1st San Francisco paper, 'California Star', published on January 9, 1847.

 

     Patrick O'BRIEN and Honor O'BRIEN had the following child:

 

        14     i.      Matilda3 O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 31 January 1846.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 31 January 1846.


 

 

 

 

 Third Generation

 

 

      7.  James3 O'BRIEN (Michael2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1824.  James died 8 May 1899 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 74 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1899 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      He married Mary MOLONEY in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1865.  Mary was born circa 1844.  Mary died 11 March 1880 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 35 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1880 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      James's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1824.  The O'Brien farm was transferred to James O'Brien in 1865. This was one year after his father, Michael died. James and his wife, Mary had a large family and she died when she was only 36 years old leaving James with a young family. James death certificate list him as a 75 years old widower. The cause of death was heart disease with a duration of seven days. There was no medical attention given and his son, James signed the certificate with his (X) on May 15,1899. His other son Michael had the tomb stone erected in Killernan graveyard. It is one of three of four O'Brien gravestones in a small area. The inscription reads: "Erected by Michael O'Brien Kilernan in memory of his father James O'Brien who died 8 May 1899 aged 75 years and his mother Mary Moloney who died 11 March 1880 aged 36 years". James was a neighbor to his cousins farm in Killernan. This family was referred to as the "Brogan O'Briens. The other O'Brien farm was referred to as the Stephen's O'Brien". I don't know how or where this term "Brogan" came from but I first heard James O'Connor the current owner of the Stephen's farm use this term.

 

He married Mary Moloney, circa 1865, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Born, circa 1844. Died, 11 Mar 1880, in Killernan, Co. Clare EIRE. Burial: circa 1880, in Killernan GY, Co. Clare EIRE. Occupation: Farmer's-wife.  When my wife, Joyce and I were on vacation visiting in Miltown Malby in June 0f 1981 we met a young man named Michael Maloney. We gave him a ride to his home in Carroduff townland one night and met his elderly father. I told him my family was from Killernan and he remembered them well. He also said that he had a relation  to the "Brogan O'Brien's". I told him that there was a Mary Maloney that married a James O'Brien and he said that was the relationship.

 

 

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of James O'BRIEN: 1st public opinion poll conducted on July 24, 1824;  William Booth founds the Salvation Army, in London, England on July 5, 1865;  patent granted for process producing celluloid on July 12, 1870;  birth of Calvin Coolidge, 30th President (1923-1929) on July 4, 1872;  the Ivy League establishes rules for college football on October 18, 1873;  birth of Carl Jung on July 26, 1875;  Colorado becomes a state on August 1, 1876;  1st electric arc light used (in California Theater) on February 10, 1879;  patent granted for an electric street car on July 13, 1880;  birth of Fred Astaire, tapdancer on May 10, 1899;  birth of E.B. White, author of "Charlotte's Web" on July 11, 1899.

 

     James O'BRIEN and Mary MOLONEY had the following children:

 

        15     i.      Michael4 O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1865.  Michael died after 1941 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland.  His body was interred in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.  He married Bridget in Co. Clare EIRE.  Bridget was born circa 1860.  Bridget died 23 March 1941 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 80 years of age.  Her body was interred in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

                        He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland.  Michael's occupation: farmer.  . He married Bridget in Co. Clare EIRE.  Michael secured the farm in Killernan in 1896 from his father. He was not listed in either of the Irish census records of 1901 or 1911. I don't know where he was at this time. Michael was responsible for erecting the tombstone to his parents in Killernan graveyard.

        16    ii.      Bridget O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1870.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 22 January 1870.

        17   iii.      Timothy O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1872.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 28 February 1872.

        18   iv.      Patrick O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1872.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 28 February 1872.

    + 19    v.      Daniel O'BRIEN was born 11 October 1873.

        20   vi.      John O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1875.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 9 May 1875.

        21 vii.      James O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1876.  James died after 1911.  James's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1876.

        22 viii.      Timothy O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 25 December 1878.  Timothy died 26 December 1878 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at less than one year of age.  His body was interred circa 1878 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.

        23   ix.      Thomas O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1880.  Thomas died after 1901.  Thomas's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1880.

  

      9.  Catherine3 O'BRIEN (James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 3 March 1834.  Catherine died 24 November 1916 in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin, at 82 years of age.  Her body was interred 25 November 1916 in Holy Cross Cemetery, 1121 Lawe Street, Kaukauna, WI 54130. 

 

      She married Thomas DOWLING in Iowa, 1866.  Thomas was born County Clare, Ireland December 1832.  Thomas died 27 October 1903 in Taylor Street, Kaukauna, Wiscosin, at 70 years of age.  His body was interred October 1903 in Holy Cross Cemetery, 1121 Lawe Street, Kaukauna, WI 54130.  Death Notice Kaukauna, Wisconsin THOMAS DOWLING Thomas Dowling, died at his home on TAylor Street, north side, on Tuesday, October 27th after an illness of over two years, of catarrh of the mouth and throat. The deceased was 72 years of age.  He was born in Coounty Clare, Ireland and came to America in 1864, settling with his wife and family in kaukauna 23 years ago.  Mr. Dowling was of a happy cheerful disposition, and bore his long and painful illness with exemplary patience and fortitude.  He has made many friends during his long residence here, who sympathize with the bereaved family in their loss, and who will long hold him in kindly remembrance. Funeral services were held at Holy Cross Church on Thursday at 9 a.m.

 

      Catherine was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin.  Catherine was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census in Ward 5, Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin.

 

 Historical events during the life of Catherine O'BRIEN: birth of Gottlieb Daimler, automobile pioneer on March 17, 1834;  birth of Beatrix Potter, writer and illustrator on July 6, 1866;  patent granted for the tape measure on July 14, 1868;  Mark Twain's "Innocents Abroad" is published on July 20, 1869;  patent granted for a doughnut cutter on July 9, 1871;  Rasputin murdered on December 16, 1916.

 

     Catherine O'BRIEN and Thomas DOWLING had the following children:

 

        24     i.      James4 DOWLING was born in Iowa 1868.  James was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin.

        25    ii.      Mary A. DOWLING was born in Wisconsin 1869.  Mary was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin.

    + 26   iii.      Margaret DOWLING was born 23 June 1871.

  

      10.  Margaret3 O'BRIEN (James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 1834.  Margaret died 12 April 1913 in Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, at 78 years of age. 

 

      She married Thomas REDDIN in St. Martin's RCC, Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, 11 June 1858.  Thomas was born in Ireland 1832.  Thomas was the son of Thomas REDDIN and Margaret REDDIN.  Thomas died 13 March 1865 in Kinston, North Carolina, at 32 years of age.  His body was interred 16 March 1865 in Old Cemetery, New Bern, North Carolina, No. 59, plot 12 grave 2126.  Dubuque Herald, March 12,1865, Newbern N. C.

 

Yesterday the enemy fell across the Neusic River , after burning the bridge on that stream.  It is reported They were all destroyed.  The Rebel ram was at the same time guarding the bridge.   Lumber is now going forward to rebuild the bridge.  The railroad is completed within a short distance opposite Kingston.  The enemy will not be able to remain in Kingston long, even if they decided to make another stand of which there is much doubt. Deserters and refuges continue to come into our lines.  The enemy suffered most, owing to their repeated charges on our works in which they repulsed each time with sever losses.  Our troops stood their ground manfully, and are in high spirits over the prospects of meeting Sherman  soon.  General Sherman has opened communication with Wilmington and Fayettesville. He sends word that he is alright and is marching on.  We expect to have some gratifying news.  Dr. Page of the Sanitaary Committee has sent a force with supplies to the front for the wounded.  He has also collected a list of killed and wounded which will be sent for publication.  General Schofield spent the Sabbath in Newbern.  The weather is warm and pleasant. (Mar. 16, 1865) This is the battle in which Thomas Reddin was wounded, guarding the bridge.  He was transferred to the Hospitol at New Bern.

 

 

 

      Margaret was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in East Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa.  DEATH OF MRS. MARGARET REDDIN

 

Mrs. Margaret Reddin died at her home in East Cascade, Saturday.  She had been in poor health for several years and failed perceptabley.  During the past winter months.  Mrs. Reddin's  maiden name was Margaret O'Brien  and she was born in County Clare, Ireland in 1834.  She was therefore in her 79th year.  She came to the United States in 1857, locating in Cascade, Iowa.  In June, 1858, she was married to Thomas Reddin.  When the Civil War Broke out, Mr. Reddin enlisted in Company D, Ninth Iowa Infantry regiment, and was killed at Kingston, North Carolina, March 13, 1865.  He left a widow with a family of children, Mrs. Reddin worked hard and nobely to their support during the years of their dependency as well as caring for her aged mother. (This was her mother-in-law, Margaret Reddin)  Her devotion during many long years was exemplary and called forth  Many expressions of commendation not only upon the occasion of her death but during her lifetime.  She was a devoted Catholic and always a consistent communicant and zealous observer of the tennents of her faith.  Mrs. Reddin is survived by her daughters Mrs. Bridget Kelly, Denver, Mary Reddin of Cascade: Grandsons George Rice of Kadoka, S. D.  And   Marshal Thomas Reddin of Cascade.  One daughter Catherine Rice died August, 1900.  One sister Mrs. Catherine Dolan (Dowling) of Seamount, Wis.  survives her. The funeral was held Tuesday morning from the residence to St. Martin's Church where services were held at 9:30.  The Pall bearers were:  S.T. Kean, P.L.Devaney, Jacob Loes, B.F. Crawford, William Drummond, and T. J. Durkin.  The family of Mrs. Reddin desire to thank their many friends and neighbors For kindnesses extended during their berevement.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Margaret O'BRIEN: birth of James Whistler, mama's boy on July 10, 1834;  Lincoln gives his famous "A house divided...." speech on June 16, 1858;  admission fee 1st charged to see a baseball game (50 cents) on July 20, 1859;  King of Siam offers President Lincoln several elephants for travel on February 14, 1861;  birth of William Randolph Hearst, newspaper publisher (SF Examiner) on April 29, 1863;  1st recorded train robbery in US on May 5, 1865;  birth of Lionel Hampton, orchestra leader & vibraphone improvisor on April 12, 1913.

 

     Margaret O'BRIEN and Thomas REDDIN had the following children:

 

    + 27     i.      Catherine4 REDDIN was born 19 July 1859.

        28    ii.      Bridget (Delia) REDDIN was born in Cascade, Jones County, Iowa 12 Feb 1861.  Bridget died 18 Jan 1945 in Denver City, Denver County, Colorado, at 83 years of age.  Her body was interred 22 January 1945 in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.  She married William KELLY.  William was born in Missouri 1864.  William was the son of Timothy KELLY and Margaret.  William died 9 September 1933 in Denver City, Denver County, Colorado, at 69 years of age.  His body was interred 12 September 1933 in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.  .  She spent her younger years in Cascade and from information taken from post cards, spent time in Nebraska.  She had asthma and probably went to Nebraska and later to Colorado for health reasons. Her husband, William Kelly had two sister living in Nebraska at the time of his death.  Delia and Will may have met during a time of these visits. There were Reddins living in Denver but I haven't been able to make the connection. .Delia Reddin and William Kelly were married in Denver, Colorado, November 20, 1886.  Delia was then Twenty-five years of age. They owned a home at Five Points but  round 1810 they moved to an apartment.  Her husband Willian Kelly was a State Food Inspector, Bailiff of West Side Criminal Court , Adjuster,and was the Court Bailiff when he died suddenly of a heart attack.Delia made several trips back to Iowa .  When her mother Margaret died she stayed at the hotel in Cascade as she said she needed the steam heat.      At times she was very lonely living away from her family. She wrote either a card or letter to her Mother and sister Mary saying how she missed them , especially at the holidays.  She and her husband traveled  to many places around the state and would mail a card to Cascade to her family. Her letters were  destroyed.  My husband said that his father Thomas Reddin had a large trunk that was full of letters and belongings .  The farm was sold when my husband found other work.  Before his mother moved to  Cascade, she went through the trunk and burnt most of its contents.  I just don't know why she did it,  probably didn't realize the value.  The only thing that was salvaged were a few pictures and post cards sent every week.  From these cards I found that Thomas Reddin and George Rice visited  Delia and Will. Delia and William Kelly never had children.

                  

                  

                  

                  

                  

                   Bridget (Delia) Reddin Kelly died at Denver, Colorado January 18, 1945. William Kelly died September 9, 1933 at Denver Colorado.

                  

                   Their address at the time of William's death was 330 East, 19th Street, Apt. #25. The had resided there for 45 years.  They are buried  in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.

                  

                   After Anna (Mrs. Thomas Reddin) died we found an address book with the Kelly's address.  We know after looking through the post cards  where she was but couldn't understand why she never kept in touch with Tom and Anna.  Must have been some friction when  Margaret died and her estate was settled.

                  

                   Delia was in the St. Anthony's hospital  in 1909 and Mary Reddin visited her at that time.

                  

                    

    + 29   iii.      Mary Ellen REDDIN was born 14 April 1863.

        30   iv.      Thomas REDDIN was born in Cascade, Jones County, Iowa 5 May 1865.  Thomas died 1865 in Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, at less than one year of age.  He was baptized in St. Martin's RCC, Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, 17 May 1865. Religion: religion unknown.  Sponsors for ths baptism were Thomas Dowling and his wife Catherine O'Brien Dowling.

  

      13.  Stephen3 O'BRIEN (James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1840.  Stephen died 6 July 1905 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 65 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1905 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      He married Margaret O'HALLORAN in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 28 January 1865.  Margaret was born in Knockanalban townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1840.  Margaret was the daughter of John O'HALLORAN and Mary SEXTON.  Margaret died circa 1920 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland.  Her body was interred circa 1920 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      Stephen's occupation: Farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1840.  There was a lapse in the church records at the time of Stephen's birth. He was most probably born on the farm in Killernan townland and baptized at the church in Mullagh. He was only about five years old when his father died in 1845 and he and his family went through the worst years in Irish History with the famine ravaging the country until 1851. He was 24 years when he was married to Margaret O'Halloran the daughter of a farmer on a farm about a mile west of the O'Brien farm. Stephen and Margaret both signed their name with an (x) on their marriage record. They were married in the Church at Mullagh by Parish Priest Patrick Moran. The witnesses were Patt Halloran and John McGuane. The next record I have on Stephen is from the Valuation Office on Ely Place, Dublin. Here listed in the property transfer books taken from the Griffith's Valuation was the transfer of property from Honoria O'Brien to her son, Stephen in 1886. In the Census of Ireland, 1901 on Form "B" House and Building Return the O'Brien property was listed as a three room private dwelling with walls made of stone or brick and a thatched roof. There were three windows in the front of the house and it was listed as a 2nd class house with five people living in the house. On Form "A", Stephen was listed as: head of family, Roman Catholic, Read nor write, male, married, born in County Clare, and speaks Irish and English. Stephens death certificate was filed in Miltown Malby on July 7,1905 by M. McDonough whom was present at death. The cause of death was listed as "probably heart disease 2 years" and no medical attention was given. Martin Cahill of Kildimo a prominent farmer and cousin to the O'Brien family told me a story about Stephen O'Brien. This was in June of 1980 at his home in Kildimo, County Clare. Martin was only about 8 years old when Stephen died but he remembered him and the story that was told of how Stephen would visit his brother, Patrick O'Brien a Royal Irish Constabulary Policeman. Patrick was stationed far away in CountyKildare about 100 miles south east of County Clare. Martin said that he would take a small cloth and pack some food in it, then tie it to a stick and place it on his shoulder and just start walking. He said he did it every year and Stephen loved to walk. This same story was told to me by Moira Sexton of Bonivilla townland in the parish another cousin of the O'Briens through the Cahills and O'Hallorans.

 

He married Margaret O'Halloran, daughter of John O'Halloran and Mary Sexton, 28 Jan 1865, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Born, circa 1840, in Knockanalban, Co. Clare EIRE. Died, circa 1920, in Killernan, Co. Clare EIRE. Christened, circa 1840, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Burial: circa 1920, in Killernan GY, Co. Clare EIRE. Occupation: Farmer's-wife. Margaret was from a large family. The O'Halloran farm was in the townland of Knocknageragh. Knocknageragh is a local name for an area in the townland of Knockanalban, (Hill of the Scotsman) also known as Mount Scot. The farm was close to Ahy Bridge. Peggy as she was called by her friends and family was very

 

 

 

picture of the O'Halloran grave vault well liked and had a reputation of being very generous. Martin Cahill of Kildimo remembered her well and told me she always had something to give to the less fortunate when they would stop at her home and ask for food of money. Margaret's, mother Mary Sexton died in 1852 and is buried in a stone vault in Killernan graveyard. This is a large vault with a slate roof. I spoke with Tadgh O'Halloran of Knockanalban in June 1980 and he said that the last person that was interned in the vault was his father. He remembered there being a large number of family members interned in that fault. Peggy had at least two sisters Mary O'Halloran married Martin Cahill of Frehane, Knockanalban. They were the parents of the rent collector from Kildimo and the grandparents of Martin Cahill the person that was so helpful to me in tracing the O'Brien family. The other sister was Eleanor O'Halloran and she married Patrick Collins of Killernan. They had a large family and her claim to fame was that she had seven daughters that all married into good families with substantial farms in the parish. Martin recited the names off without taking a breath: Margaret Collins married John McGuane of Killernan, Catherine Collins married White of Clonlaheen (The Hand), Bridget Collins married James O'Brien of Coore, Mary Collins married McInerney of Annagh, Sarah Collins married Breen of Ballymackea, another daughter married Kennelly of Letterkelly, and another Gallagher of Tooreen.  Margaret's and Stephen's oldest son, James was born mildly retarded. He was a strong worker and an asset on the farm. Margaret was worried all her life that James would not have anyone to take care of him if anything ever happened to her There is no death record for Margaret but I can guess she died around 1920. I haven't found a death record for James either but I believe she had her wish and her son predeceased her.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Stephen O'BRIEN: birth of Thomas Nast, political cartoonist of late 1800s America on September 27, 1840;  birth of Charles Proteus Steinmetz on April 9, 1865;  William Booth founds the Salvation Army, in London, England on July 5, 1865;  "Blue Danube" waltz played in US for the 1st time in NY on July 1, 1867;  patent granted for process producing celluloid on July 12, 1870;  patent granted for a doughnut cutter on July 9, 1871;  world's 1st train robbery, by Jesse James on July 21, 1873;  birth of Carl Jung on July 26, 1875;  patent granted for an electric street car on July 13, 1880;  birth of Myrna Loy, actress on August 2, 1905.

 

     Stephen O'BRIEN and Margaret O'HALLORAN had the following children:

 

    + 31     i.      Catherine4 O'BRIEN was born circa 1865.

        32    ii.      James O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1867.  James died circa 1920 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland.  His body was interred circa 1920 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.  James's occupation: farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 5 October 1867.  James was baptized in the church at Mullagh, his sponsors were Michael and Catherine Collins. James was living with his parents in the 1901 Irish census where he was listed as Dumb. In the 1911 census he was listed as idiot , deaf and dumb. James was moderately retarded and was a strong worker on the farm. I think he died sometime before 1920 when we was about 50 years.  James was a favorite of his father's.  This caused some jealousy between the youngest son, John.  James never realized it but John would get him to do a lot of John's work so he could go off and play with friends.  When his parents found out about this John would get in trouble and have to pay the price.

    + 33   iii.      Bridget O'BRIEN was born circa 1870.

        34   iv.      Patrick O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1871.  Patrick died 5 April 1944 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 72 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1944 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.  Patrick's occupation: farmer.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 23 December 1871.  . Patrick stayed on the farm in Killernan and never married. He was known as "Paddy Stephens" and was well over six feet tall with a reputation of one of the strongest men in the parish. His civil birth record recorded January 10, 1872 for his birth and was registered on January 19, 1872. This is a month after his baptism record that was recorded in the church at Mullagh and is in all probability the real date because the church recording was more important to the Irish then the English registration. The sponsors for his baptism were Michael and Catherine Collins, cousins and neighbors to the O'Brien's. In 1923 Patrick O'Brien was registered as owner in fee simple of the lands comprised in the Folio #10521, County of Clare, Killernan townland, Barony of Ibrickane. He was to pay an annuity of five pounds fourteen shillings and ten pence beginning on the 1st. of June 1923 and payable to the Irish Land Commission until an advance of 164 pounds has been repaid. This land was from the Estate of Lord Leconfield E.C. 10142, L.R.182-22040. Patrick acquired the farm after his mothers death and had the property until his death. On his death record he was listed as a seventy-three year old bachelor on old age pension. The cause of death was chronic endocarditis one year, cardiac failure certified. Francis Keavey of Dunsallagh townland was responsible for the burial of the body and registration of the death. Francis Keavey was a neighbor and close friend of the O'Brien's. Martin Cahill of Kildimo told me in June of 1980 that he remembered Paddy Stephens well and said he was a good man and a hard worker. He said Paddy liked to drink and one time he was in Miltown Malby and had a few too many and started an argument with one of the R.I.C policeman, Officer Doran. He evidently beat Mr. Doran seriously and was arrested for the act. When the other policemen subdued Patrick they were equally as violent and mangled his arm to the extent he never had full use of it again. My grandfather John was his youngest brother and he had a lot of respect for Paddy when he was in charge of the farm. There is a story that was told by my father and uncles that their father John was using Paddy's horse to carry seaweed from the ocean back to the farms to sell for fertilizer. On this particular day it was an unusually heavy load and the horse somehow died. The story goes on to say that John was so frightened of Paddy Stephens that he shoved a potato down it's throat and said he choked on it when he was feeding the horse. Some say John came to America to hide away from Paddy Stephens after that incident.                           John S. O'Brien and his wife Kathleen visited Ireland during the summer of 1976.  They rented a car and were staying in the Mullagh area at a bed and breakfast owned and operated by Mrs. Torpy. John didn't know exactly where the O'Brien farm was so he visited a pub in Mullagh called Kitty Conways across the street from the guest house. There he met some locals and started asking questions about the O'Brien farm.  Then he mentioned hisfather's brother's  name "Paddy Stephens".  They told his you couldn't be from that family you don't have the size.  They then told him stories about Paddy Stephens and how he was one of the strongest men in the parish. During this night John met Michael O'Halloran and his son.  This is the brother of Tadgh O'Hollaran of Knockanalban.  A 2nd cousin of John's.

                  

                    

        35    v.      Stephen O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1873.  Stephen died 13 January 1945 Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland, at 71 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1945 in Killernan Graveyard, County Clare, Ireland.  Stephen's occupation: laborer-scooper.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 21 November 1873.  Stephen immigrated, 1 June 1896. Destination: destination unknown.  Immigration: 1 Jun 1896, in NYC, Price County WI, Buffalo, NY Naturalized (Left Ireland on 23 May 1896 on Ship Luistania from Queenstown, Ireland.). Occupation: laborer-scooper. Stephen's civil birth records his birth taking place in Killernan on the 29 January 1874. The registration was on the 6th of February 1874 and his father, Stephen signing his (X) in the informant column. Like the other children's births his father didn't want to pay a fine for not registering his child's birth in time and he used a convenient date on the day he registered. The baptism record in Mullagh church was more than two months before this and is probably correct. The sponsors for the baptism were Aunt and Uncle Edmond and Mary Cahill. Stephen was given money to emigrate to America from his Uncle Patrick's estate. He left Queenstown, Ireland on the 23rd of May 1896 and landed in New York City on the 1st. June1896. He traveled on the ship Luistania. This was not the famous ship that the German U-boats sunk in world war 1 but an earlier version that sunk in 1901. The USS Luistania was built in 1907.  He and his older sister, Bridget made the trip together and shortly after they arrived in New York they went to Wisconsin. There were relations to the O'Brien's in Wisconsin by the name of O'Boyle. The little information I have on then is from a little writing on back of some pictures of Stephen and Delia.  Stephen petitioned for his naturalization at Phillips  Wisconsin in the circuit court of Price County, Wisconsin on the 3rd of November 1900. He was granted his citizenship on the 5th day of December 1917 in Buffalo, NY. His witnesses were Thomas J. Dillon, a fireman that resided at 75 Johnson Park, Buffalo, NY and James Kennedy, a saloon-keeper of 266 West Genesee St. Buffalo, NY. Sometime after November 1900 Stephen and Delia moved to Elmira, NY and stayed with their cousins the Cahill's. Stephen was there a few years before he and his brother, John moved to Buffalo, NY. Stephen and John were working at the Gas Works and boarding in Finnegan's Flats at 197 Front Street at this time. They worked different shifts and slept in the same bed when the other was working. Stephen found a well paying job on Buffalo's waterfront as a scooper in the grain elevators. This was a seasonal job and slowed down during the winter months. Stephen was doing very well at this job until he had an accident at work when his feet were crushed. After this Stephen didn't work steady and he wondered around Buffalo. Sometime he would stay at his brother's house until he got back on his feet and would go out again. He was a handsome man and looked very much like his brother John which he used to his advantage. He was going to the saloons where John had credit and he was running up bills. When Stephen heard that John was on to his free drinks, he left Buffalo and went to Riverside, NJ with his widowed sister, Delia O'Brien Cahill; this was sometime after 1926. In Riverside, Stephen worked at a night watchman in a watch factory. He saved his money and made at least one trip back to Ireland to visit. On this trip he purchased a pair of brass candlesticks for his sister, Delia. These are now in my possession. Catherine Imhoff gave these to my mother, C. Dorothy O'Brien. and she gave then to me.  Stephen went back to Ireland in the late thirties to retire on the farm. Stephen and his niece, Margaret Cahill took a train to Boston where he sailed on a ship back to Ireland. Margaret went with him because of his health and she kept his accounts for him.  When I was talking with Martin Cahill of Kildimo in 1980 at his home he told me that Stephen came back to Ireland with a pile of money.  The first thing he did was go to the bank in Miltown Malby and deposit his money to keep it safe.  Every week Stephen would take the six or so mile walk into Miltown Malby and go to the bank and withdrawal all his money.  He would then proceed to count it and  then redeposit it after he was sure it was all there. After his brother Paddy Stephens died in 1945 the farm was turned over to his youngest sister, Maria O'Brien.  When this was done Stephen O'Brien was given a small room and the right to the use of the kitchen and to be supported. Stephen died at the farm in Killernan. He was listed as a bachelor on old age pension. The cause of death was cerebral hemorrhage, one month cardiac failure certified. Francis Keavey of Dunsallagh a neighbor was present at death and had the body buried on the hill at the ancestral plot in Killernan graveyard.

    + 36   vi.      John J. O'BRIEN was born circa 1875.

        37 vii.      Maria O'BRIEN was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1880.  Maria died 8 December 1961 in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE, at 81 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1961 in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE.  Maria's occupation: Spinster.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 23 May 1880.  Sponsors were Mary and Edmond Cahill. . Maria's civil birth certificate records her birth date as August 1, 1880. Her father was the informant and put his  (X) on the form on August 9, 1880. Again this was two months past her baptism date which should be the actual date. It looks like her father didn't make it to town very often to record his children's births on time. Her Aunt and Uncle Edmond and Mary Cahill were the sponsors for her baptism that was held at the church in Mullagh. Maria was listed in the 1901 and 1911 Irish census living with her family on the farm in Killernan. In August of 1944 Maria became full owner of the property in Killernan townland. During this time James O'Connor of Knockbrack, Miltown Malby was working on the farm as a farmhand. He purchased the farm from Maria in August of 1946 for 380 pounds plus fees (with reservations). Maria was given the west bedroom to live the rest of her life. She lived there in the early 1950's until James and his wife Mary started to have a family and the Maria decided to movein with her niece, Delia Ryan Lahiff of Kilnaboy parish. Maria was close to Delia because Delia as a young girl would spend time in Killernan with her aunt Maria. Delia told me that they would go to church every Sunday at the Coore Chapel and take the couple mile walk to mass. On the way back from mass they would stop at Catherine Looneys store and have tea and a small lunch with her. Catherine Looney married Tadgh O'Halloran of Knockanalban a cousin of Maria's. I visited them in June 1980 and Catherine O'Halloran remembered Maria and Delia visiting her. She said that Maria had the most beautiful long reddish blonde hair she had ever seen. Maria only lived with Delia a short time. She then went up to Dromoher to the Ryan farm to live with her sister, Catherine O'Brien Ryan. Catherine was living with her son Paddy Ryan and his wife Anne. Catherine died in 1953 and Maria stayed on with her nephew, Paddy and wife until she died. Maria died when she was 80 years old. Paddy Ryan recorded the death on 23 of May 1961 five months after she died. She is buried with her sister in Kilnaboy graveyard. Maria kept in touch with her brother, John and sister, Delia in America. John in return would send money and house slippers to her as gifts for my grandfather. My grandfather would wear the slippers to break them in so they wouldn't have to pay a customs tax on new slippers when they were mailed to Ireland.  Delia O'Brien Cahill would send her tea because it was so hard to come by during the war. I have a number of post cards with pictures of the local areas that Maria sent back thanking Delia for the tea. Maria also corresponded with her niece, Catherine Cahill and sent her a Belleek China candy dish as a gift one year. Catherine Cahill's niece passed Maria's dish on to me and I still have it displayed at my home.

                        One of the nicest things that I have in my possession that belonged in the O'Brien household in Killernan is the picture of the Sacred Heart of Jesus that hung in the main room like it does in almost every Irish household. This picture of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was from June 6, 1933 when a Eucharist Congress was held in Dublin, Ireland. Maria enrolled her parents and brothers and sisters on this document. After Maria left the farm it was still hanging in the house and James O'Connor gave it to Margaret Cahill of Riverside, NY when she was visiting in 1964. Margaret gave it to me in 1980 when my mother and I were visiting her that spring.


 

                  

                    

 

 

 

 Fourth Generation

 

 

      19.  Daniel4 O'BRIEN (James3, Michael2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland 11 October 1873.  Daniel died 9 September 1946 in Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland, at 72 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1946 in Kilbridget Cemetery, Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      He married Sarah KING in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 2 February 1899.  Sarah was born in Rath-Mullagh, Co. Clare EIRE 22 February 1865.  Sarah was the daughter of Michael KING and Margaret (Peg) LOONEY.  Sarah died 14 April 1943 in Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland, at 78 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1943 in Kilbridget Cemetery, Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland. 

 

      Daniel's occupation: Baker.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, circa 1873.  The O'Briens of Mullagh were known as the "Baker O'Briens" because Dan O'Brien owned a bakery in the village of Mullagh known as the "Bakehouse". The dwelling house and shop were built by Dan O'Brien, on the site where the Scales family once had a blacksmith's forge.  Dan O'Brien had trained as a baker in England, and he had quite a successful bakery business, together with the grocery and hardware shop.  Dan was a very flamboyant character, who was the life and soul of the village life.  Sarah on the other hand,  was quiet gentle and of a generous nature.

 

 Historical events during the life of Daniel O'BRIEN: world's 1st train robbery, by Jesse James on July 21, 1873;  the Ivy League establishes rules for college football on October 18, 1873;  birth of Gloria Swanson on March 27, 1899;  birth of Dennis Gabor, inventor of holography (3D laser photography) on June 5, 1900;  Trans-Pacific cable links Hawaii to US on December 28, 1902;  birth of Johnny Weissmuller, "Me Tarzan.." on June 2, 1904;  process for recording sound on film patented on August 11, 1906;  A-bomb tested at Bikini Atoll on July 1, 1946;  birth of Jacqueline Bisset on September 13, 1946.

 

     Daniel O'BRIEN and Sarah KING had the following children:

 

    + 38     i.      John Joseph5 O'BRIEN was born 4 June 1900.

    + 39    ii.      Mary O'BRIEN was born 11 December 1902.

        40   iii.      Margaret (Peg) O'BRIEN was born in Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland 24 May 1904.  Margaret died 10 September 1973 in Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland, at 69 years of age.  Her body was interred in Mullagh GY, Co. Clare EIRE.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland.  Margaret's occupation: Shopkeeper in Mullagh, County Clare, Ireland.  Margaret was known as Peg and never married.  She assisted her brother Michael in the running of the family business, and slept at her cousin Bridie Kings's house each night.  She was a good business person and took an active part in church affairs. When her sister-in-law, Nora died in 1956, she became mother to Michael's eight children, caring for them and continuing to manage the family business until her death on the 10th of September 1973.  The verse on her memorial card sums up her personality: A life made beautiful by kind deeds, A helping hand for others needs, To a beautiful life  came a happy end, She died as she lived, everyone's friend.

    + 41   iv.      Michael O'BRIEN was born 10 August 1906.

  

      26.  Margaret4 DOWLING (Catherine3 O'BRIEN, James2, John1) was born in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin 23 June 1871.  Margaret died 21 September 1947 in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin, at 76 years of age.  Her body was interred 23 September 1947 in St. John's RC Church, Seymour, Outagamie County, Wisconsi. 

 

      She married Charles PAULIE in Appleton, Outagamie County, Wisconsin, 27 May 1891.  the witnesses to the wedding were Otto Stimmer and Chris Roemer.  The marriage was performed by Justice of Peace, Joseph Roemer, Appleton, Outagamie County, Wisconsin.

 

      Charles was born in Freedom, Outagamie County, Wisconsin 29 June 1871.  Charles died 2 June 1953 in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin, at 81 years of age.  His body was interred 6 June 1953 in St. John's RC Church, Seymour, Outagamie County, Wisconsi.  CHARLES PAULIE, 81 DIES SUDDENLY TUESDAY Charles H. Paulie, 81 died suddenly about 7:15 Tuesday evening at his home.  Born JUne 29th. 1871, in Freedom; he operated a repair shop in Seymour for many years, and had retired about a moth ago. Survivors are 2 daughters, Mrs. Ann Hoffman, Seymour;  Miss Florence paulie, at home; 3 sons Robert Paulie, Appleton; Sylvester and Harry Paulie of Milwaukee; 4 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren; 1 sister, Mrs. Carrie Hill, Los Angeles, California. Funeral services will be held at 9:30 Saturday morning at St. John's Catholic church with REv. A. M. Grill officiating.  Burial will be in the parish cemetery.  Friends may call at he Muehl Funeral home after 7 o'clock Thursday evening. The rosary will be recited at 8 o'clock Friday evening.

 

      Margaret was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin.  Her funeral was held in St. John's RC Church, Seymour, Outagamie County, Wisconsi, 23 September 1947.  MRS. CHARLES PAULIE Mrs. Charles Paulie, nee Margaret Dowling, died early Sunday morning, September 21; at her home in Seymour, at the age of 76 years.  Mrs Paulie had been in poor health for a long time but her death came suddenly. She was born, June 29th., 1871.  She was united in marriage to Charles H. Paulie at Kaukauna May 27, 1891. Besides her husband she is survived by three sons, Sylvester of Milwaukee, Robert of Appleton, Harry of Seymour and two daughters, Mrs. M. M. Hoffman of Seymour and Florence at home. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9:30 at St. John's Catholic church.  Interment was at the parish cemetery.

 

 Historical events during the life of Margaret DOWLING: patent granted for a doughnut cutter on July 9, 1871;  a patent was granted for the travelers cheque on July 7, 1891;  1st successful suture of the heart performed on July 9, 1893;  words for "America, the Beautiful" appear in print on July 4, 1895;  coronation of King Edward VII on August 9, 1902;  birth of Olav V of Denmark on July 2, 1903;  birth of Myrna Loy, actress on August 2, 1905;  birth of Thurgood Marshall on July 2, 1908;  "The Spike Jones Show" debuted on CBS radio on October 3, 1947.

 

     Margaret DOWLING and Charles PAULIE had the following children:

 

    + 42     i.      Harry T.5 PAULIE was born 1893.

        43    ii.      Anna A. PAULIE was born in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin 1895.  She married M. M. HOFFMAN.

        44   iii.      Sylvester S. PAULIE was born in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin 1902.  Sylvester died 7 July 1967 in Ocanto Falls, Wisconsin, at 65 years of age.

        45   iv.      Norbert PAULIE was born in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin 1903.  Norbert died 22 Sept 1946 in Green Bay, Wisconsin, at 43 years of age.  He married Elsie ROLOFF.

        46    v.      Eva M. PAULIE was born in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin 1905.

        47   vi.      Florence PAULIE was born in Seymour, Outgamie County, Wisconsin 1908.

  

      27.  Catherine4 REDDIN (Margaret3 O'BRIEN, James2, John1) was born in Richland townland, Jones County, Iowa 19 July 1859.  Catherine died 24 Aug 1900 in Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, at 41 years of age.  Her body was interred Aug 1900 in St. Martin's Cemetery, Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa. 

 

      She married Charles C. RICE in St. Martin's RCC, Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, 17 September 1877.  Charles was born in Bowen Prairie, Jones County, Iowa 1854.  Charles was the son of Lucian RICE and Elizabeth Allen RICE.  Charles died 1888 in Butte City, Montana, at 34 years of age. 

 

      She was baptized in St. Martin's RCC, Cascade, Dubuque County, Iowa, 1859. Religion: religion unknown.  In 1880 Catherine and  son George were living in Cascade with her mother Margaret Reddin. They later moved to Montana.  Charles had a brother George living in Montana at Deere Lodge Co. Mt City of Butte.  In 1888 after her husband died, she moved into Denver near her sister Delia Kelly. Between 1886-87 everything changed for the cattlemen and cowboy.  The summer was bone dry but the winter of 1886-87 was the most devastating ever recorded on the northern plains.  Storms broke up herds and snow buried them; sixty per cent of the cattle in Montana alone died.  Many ranchers lost all that they owned and therefore gave up all together.

 

DEATH OF MRS. C. C. RICE

 

      Mrs. Charles C. Rice died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Margaret Reddin in East Cascade at 6:30 o'clock Monday morning, during which time she was a  keen suffer.

      Her maiden name was Kate Reddin and she was born in Cascade July 19, 1959.  She married to Charles C. Rice Sept.17,1877.  Two children were born to them.  Kitty who died in infancy in Butte City, Montana in 1888. And a son George .Since that time, Mrs. Rice lived in Denver, until about one year ago when she returned to Cascade hoping  the change of climate would benefit her health.  The funeral took place at St. Martin's Church Wednesday at 9 a.m. and was attended by a large concourse of friends and neighbors.

 

(Charles Rice also died in 1888 at Butte City , Montana)

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Catherine REDDIN: 1st intercollegiate baseball game on July 1, 1859;  admission fee 1st charged to see a baseball game (50 cents) on July 20, 1859;  the American Humane Association was organized on October 9, 1877;  discovery of saccharin announced - dieters everywhere rejoice on February 27, 1879;  birth of Helen Hayes on October 10, 1900.

 

     Catherine REDDIN and Charles C. RICE had the following children:

 

        48     i.      Catherine5 RICE was born in Butte City, Montana.

    + 49    ii.      George Henry RICE was born 26 February 1879.

  

      29.  Mary Ellen4 REDDIN (Margaret3 O'BRIEN, James2, John1) was born in Cascade, Jones County, Iowa 14 April 1863.  Mary died 24 December 1914 in Whitewater Township, Dubuque County, Iowa, at 51 years of age. 

 

      She married Mr. MYLADY.  .  She spent her younger years in Cascade and from information taken from post cards, spent time in Nebraska.  She had asthma and probably went to Nebraska and later to Colorado for health reasons. Her husband, William Kelly had two sister living in Nebraska at the time of his death.  Delia and Will may have met during a time of these visits. There were Reddins living in Denver but I haven't been able to make the connection. .Delia Reddin and William Kelly were married in Denver, Colorado, November 20, 1886.  Delia was then Twenty-five years of age. They owned a home at Five Points but  round 1810 they moved to an apartment.  Her husband Willian Kelly was a State Food Inspector, Bailiff of West Side Criminal Court , Adjuster,and was the Court Bailiff when he died suddenly of a heart attack.Delia made several trips back to Iowa .  When her mother Margaret died she stayed at the hotel in Cascade as she said she needed the steam heat.      At times she was very lonely living away from her family.  She wrote either a card or letter to her Mother and sister Mary saying how she missed them , especially at the holidays.  She and her husband traveled  to many places around the state and would mail a card to Cascade to her family. Her letters were  destroyed.  My husband said that his father Thomas Reddin had a large trunk that was full of letters and belongings .  The farm was sold when my husband found other work.  Before his mother moved to  Cascade, she went through the trunk and burnt most of its contents.  I just don't know why she did it,  probably didn't realize the value.  The only thing that was salvaged were a few pictures and post cards sent every week.  From these cards I found that Thomas Reddin and George Rice visited  Delia and Will. Delia and William Kelly never had children.

 

 

 

 

 

Bridget (Delia) Reddin Kelly died at Denver, Colorado January 18, 1945. William Kelly died September 9, 1933 at Denver Colorado.

 

Their address at the time of William's death was 330 East, 19th Street, Apt. #25. The had resided there for 45 years.  They are buried  in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.

 

After Anna (Mrs. Thomas Reddin) died we found an address book with the Kelly's address.  We know after looking through the post cards  where she was but couldn't understand why she never kept in touch with Tom and Anna.  Must have been some friction when  Margaret died and her estate was settled.

 

Delia was in the St. Anthony's hospital  in 1909 and Mary Reddin visited her at that time.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Mary Ellen REDDIN: birth of William Randolph Hearst, newspaper publisher (SF Examiner) on April 29, 1863;  birth of Max Weber on April 18, 1881;  Germany uses tear gas, introducing chemical warfare on January 3, 1915.

 

     Mary Ellen REDDIN and Mr. MYLADY had the following child:

 

    + 50     i.      Thomas J.5 REDDIN was born 1 April 1881.

  

  Ryan Homestead, Upper Dromher, Kilnaboy, Co. Clare. Catherine O'Brien Ryan, Delia Ryan Lahiff, Mary Lahiff, and Patrick Ryan. circa 1935.

 

      31.  Catherine4 O'BRIEN (Stephen3, James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1865.  Catherine died 25 November 1953 in Upper Dromher, Co. Clare EIRE, at 88 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1953 in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE. 

 

      She married John RYAN in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 12 February 1895.  John was born in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE 11 June 1862.  John was the son of John RYAN and Mary HEALY.  John died 30 September 1927 in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE, at 65 years of age.  His body was interred in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE. 

 

      Catherine's occupation: Farmer's-wife.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 19 November 1865.  Catherine O'Brien was the only child of Stephens whose civil birth record was close to the church baptism record. The civil record listed November 20, 1865 (one day after the church record). Stephen was the informant and signed his (X) on the 7th of December 1865.The sponsors for her baptism were Luke Darcy and Mary Collins both cousins on the O'Halloaran side of the family. Catherine marriage was arranged to John Ryan of Dromoher by a cattle dealer from Ennistimon named Healy. John Ryans mother was a Healy and this match maker was her relation.  Her marriage was secured with a dowry from her Uncle Patrick O'Brien, retired Royal Irish Constabulary.  The Ryan family raised cattle on their farm in Upper Dromoher. in Kilnaboy parish. She was married in the church at Coore by Father Michael Murray, the witnesses were Bridget McGuane and John Healy. Mary Ruane a granddaughter of Catherine's told me she was very close to her grandmother and spent many a night and day in her home. She would sleep with her in her bed and her grandmother, Catherine would teach her prayers. She also remembers Catherine fondness for tea and she that she was the expert. Catherine died at 77 years old of syncope myocarditis certified. Bridget Ryan Lahiff of Roughan was the informant and registered the death on the 28th of November 1953. She was buried with her husband in Kilnaboy Graveyard in the Ryan family plot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture of Katie Paddy, Delia Mary She married John Ryan, son of John Ryan and Mary Healy, 12 Feb 1895, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Born, 11 Jun 1862, in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE. Died, 30 Sep 1927, in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE. Christened in Kilnaboy, Co. Clare EIRE. Burial in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE. Occupation: Farmer.  John was from a large family, he was the second child and oldest son of eleven children. The Ryan family had over 120 acres of land in Dromoher, Co. Clare. The Ryan family was on this farm from at least 1835, before this his grandparents, John Ryan and Bridget Neylon were both from the townland of Leamaneh in Kilnaboy parish. This is the same townland where the famous Leamaneh Castle still stands and was once the home of Conor O'Brien and his wife Marie Rue O'Brien.

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Catherine O'BRIEN: William Booth founds the Salvation Army, in London, England on July 5, 1865;  birth of Jean Sibelius, major Scandinavian composer on December 8, 1865;  patent granted for a glass blowing machine on February 26, 1895;  Charles Brady King 1st rode the streets of Detroit in his "Horseless Carriage" on March 6, 1896;  PTA is founded on February 17, 1897;  US Marines land at Cuba in Spanish-American War on June 10, 1898;  birth of Erich Fromm on March 23, 1900;  birth of Edgar Bergen, liked to hang out with dummies on February 16, 1903;  Fidel Castro begins Cuban revolution on July 26, 1953;  Los Angeles becomes the nation's 3rd largest city on December 8, 1953.

 

     Catherine O'BRIEN and John RYAN had the following children:

 

        51     i.      Patrick5 RYAN was born in Upper Dromoher, Co. Clare EIRE 27 February 1896.  Patrick died circa 1980 in Co. Clare EIRE.  His body was interred circa 1980 in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE.  He married Ann CARROLL.  Ann was born in Kilnaboy, Co. Clare EIRE circa 1903.  Ann died February 1996 in Liscullane, Corofin, Co. Clare, EIRE, at 92 years of age.  Her body was interred February 1996 in Kilnaboy GY, Co. Clare EIRE. 

                        He was christened in Kilnaboy, Co. Clare EIRE.  Patrick's occupation: Farmer.  . He married Ann Carroll.  Paddy lived out his life on the Ryan farm in Upper Drohomer.  He and his wife Ann never had children and the farm passed onto a niece in Ann's family.  Ann died in1996

    + 52    ii.      John RYAN was born 19 January 1897.

    + 53   iii.      Stephen RYAN was born 6 June 1898.

    + 54   iv.      Mary RYAN was born 20 March 1900.

    + 55    v.      Bridget RYAN was born 8 February 1903.

  

      33.  Bridget4 O'BRIEN (Stephen3, James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1870.  Bridget died 24 June 1953 in Riverside, Burlington NJ, at 82 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1953 in St. Peters GY, Riverside NJ. 

 

      She married John CAHILL in St. Patrick's, Elmira, NY, 9 November 1905.  John was born in Frehane, Co. Clare EIRE 24 June 1854.  John was the son of Michael CAHILL and Katherine DARCY.  He married Bridget FITZPATRICK in St. Joseph's, Sommerville MASS, 25 November 1891.  John died 23 October 1913 in Waverly, Tioga Co. NY USA, at 59 years of age.  His body was interred 27 October 1913 in St James GY, Waverly NY USA. 

 

      Bridget's occupation: laundress.  She was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 30 January 1870.  Bridget immigrated, 1 June 1896. Destination: destination unknown.  Bridget O'Brien was called Delia all her life. Delia's civil birth certificate records her birth as February 14, 1870. Her father recorded the birth on the 21st February 1870 and signed the record with an (X). Again this was a month after her baptism record. The sponsors for her baptism were Cornelius and Sarah Collins, 1st. cousins of theirs.  They were children of her Aunt Eleanor O'Halloran Collins of Killernan.. They were first cousins and neighbors of the O'Brien's. Bridget was given money from her uncle Patrick's estate to emigrate to America. She came to America in May 1896 and landed in New York City. Shortly after this she went to Wisconsin and stayed with cousins by the name of O'Boyle. There are a few pictures of her when she was living in Wisconsin. Somewhere around 1900 she moved to Elmira, NY and stayed with her cousins the Cahill's. There were four Cahill sisters living and working in Elmira as domestics. They helped her find a job and she stayed there. The Cahill sisters had acousin of theirs living about 20 miles away in Waverly, NY. This was a railroad town and their cousin, John Cahill formerly of Frehane, Co. Clare lived and worked there. He was widowed in 1905 and was left with two small children,, Margaret and Thomas. Somehow through the Cahill's sisters Delia met John Cahill and they married a few years later. My grandfather, John O'Brien was the bestman at the wedding. They lived in their own house on railroad property on the New York Pennsylvania border. They ran a small grocery store and Delia took in laundry. She was only married five years before tragedy struck and John died leaving her with three children. She worked hard and with help from her brother, Stephen, Margaret was able to attend Cortland Teachers College. She lived in Waverly, NY until 1926 when she and John's only daughter, Catherine moved to Riverside, NJ into a new duplex on 316 Lippencutt Avenue. Margaret had just purchased the house for them. Delia lived with Margaret until she died.

 

 

 

 

 

John Cahill 1854 - 1913 Delia married John Cahill, son of Michael Cahill and Katherine Darcy, on 9 Nov 1905, in St. Patrick's, Elmira, NY. Born, 24 Jun 1854, in Frehane, Co. Clare EIRE. Died, 23 Oct 1913, in Waverly, Tioga Co. NY USA. Christened, circa 1854, in Kilmurry-Ibrickane, Co. Clare EIRE. Burial: 27 Oct 1913, in St. James GY, Waverly, NY USA. Immigration: 4 Jul 1882, in Boston, Mass. USA. Occupation: Railroad-worker.

 

 

 

Delia Cahill and brother John O'Brien Riverside, NJ circa 1945 John Cahill emigrated to America and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts aboard the ship Anna. After his arrival in Boston he soon left for the western part of the United States to find work in the Idaho Territory. This was an exciting time in American History because gold was recently discovered in the territory and the United States Army was still fighting the American Indian for control of their land.  After a few years out west John returned to Boston, Massachusetts and married Bridget Fitzpatrick, at St. Joseph's R.C. Church in Sommerville. Massachusetts, Bridget was also from Kilmurry Ibrickane parish. She was born in Bonavilla townland. John and Bridget moved to Waverly, NY. There they operated a grocery store and John worked on the Erie Railroad. They had two children, Margaret born in 1895 and Thomas born in 1898. Bridget died in November 1903 after a short illness and John was left to raise two children. This he did with the help of his four cousins, Margaret, Delia, Anne and Catherine Cahill. They were his first cousins, the daughters of his uncle and aunt, Martin Cahill and Mary O'Halloran. John married again in 1908 to another first cousin of the Cahill sisters.  This time his wife was related to the O'Halloran side of the family. There was a question to this marriage to Delia O'Brien but their best man, John O'Brien found a woman in Buffalo by the name of Maggie Mescal that could trace the genealogy and prove that there was no blood relation between the engaged couple. This satisfied the priest and he was glad to marry them. John continued to work on the railroad and was also working on a project where he was redesigning the wheel axle box for railroad cars. His invention was approved  and patented in 1898 and he was offered $20,000 for the patent rights at this  time. John never accepted the offer and was working on more improvements when  he died in 1913. So he and his family never received any royalties for his  patent. The working model was in the barn at their home for years and all the papers were left at his home in a metal box. John is buried with his first  wife, Bridget Fitzpatrick in St. James Cemetery, Waverly, NY.

 

Children of John Cahill and Bridget Fitzgerald:

 

i.  Margaret Marie Cahill  was born in Waverly, NY in April 1895.Margaret was the first daughter of John Cahill and Bridget Fitzgerald.  Margaret was an amazing person to know.  I had the opportunity to stay with Margaret and sit with her and discuss the family history.  She was very proud of her heritage.  Margaret was only 8 years old when her mother died and she remembered sitting at her mothers beside holding her hand with two nuns form the Catholic school when her mother quietly passed away. The day after the funeral her father took her into the kitchen and cut off her long curly blonde hair trying to explain that he would not have the time or patience to take care of her beautiful hair.  That day she placed it in box to save.  Eighty-two years later she told me the story and I followed her directions town in the basement and retrieved the box with the long golden blonde curls.

 

 

 

Margaret Cahill and Tom Cahill circa 1900    Margaret was a bright student and she graduated from Waverly High School in 1912.  Again Margaret had an experience with death as she  sat at her fathers bed side when he died.  John came home from a railroad meeting with chest pains.  He died during the night and she had to tell her 3 year old sister that he Daddy wasn't coming back. Little Catherine didn't understand and Catherine led Margaret through the house holding her hand looking in under all the beds and behind the doors for her father.  Margaret said it was one of the saddest days in her life  She went on Cortland Normal School, graduating in 1915  and became a teacher.  Her first teaching job was in a rural community in Pennsylvania.  She boarded with a family and taught 1 - 8 grade in a one room school house.  The man in the house would drive her to school with his horse and buggy and help her start the fire in the stove every morning.  She only spent a few years there and then tool a job teaching in Camden, NJ  She move there in 1919 and boarded with a family.  The house was across from a cemetery in Riverside.  The Flue epidemic of 1919 was ragging across America and thousands of Americans were dying.  Margaret said she was sick and all night long she couldn't sleep because all she could hear were the graves being dug for the next days death toll.  She said they couldn't built coffins fast enough so people rented them. They had a trap door in the bottom and they would lower the coffin and then take the coffin  back out empty.  In 1924 she purchased a house that she would live in the rest of her life- 316 Lippencutt Avenue, Riverside, NJ.  Two year later in 1926 her sister ,Catherine. And step -mother , Delia moved down with her.  Margaret's home had three bedrooms and they all had their own bedroom until Uncle Stephen O'Brien moved to Riverside after his accident in Buffalo.  He was only there a few years before he went back to Ireland.  Margaret taught school until 1959 when she retired with 44 years of teaching.  She was a remarkable teacher and students and children of students kept in touch with her until she died in 1985.  Margaret received over 80 birthday cards every year from her friends and students.  I visited her in the spring of 1984 while doing business and I found her busy at the dinning room table studying. Margaret had a large world atlas and maps spread out on the table trying to memorize the new countries in Africa and Asia.  She had read something in the paper and she didn't know where it was and thought it important that she knew what it was.  John O'Brien told me that Margaret would visit them in the early 1920's when they were children and everyone loved her.  She would bring them gifts like tooth brushes and explain how important it was to brush their teeth.  They all had a great respect for Margaret.

 

 

 

Tom and John O'Brien

 

 

 

Margaret Cahill and Delia Cahill and Catherine Cahill Imhoff i.  Thomas Cahill was born around 1898 in Waverly, NY.   Tom's  life like his father was on the railroads.  He worked his whole life on railroad. He wasn't interested in going to college like his sister, Margaret.  Tom just wanted to work on the railroad.  Tom married Mary ______ .  She was divorced and had four children.  Tom was in a railroad accident and fell between two railroad cars and had is arm cut off at the shoulder.  Tom had a number of surgeries to repair his shoulder but he was never out of discomfort and pain.  Tom retired from the railroad and was active in many organizations in Waverly, NY and Sayre, PA.  He was a member of the Elks Lodge in Waverly.  One day in October 1976 Tom and Mary had their usual breakfast and Tom finished and walked out to the barn to do some work and he while out their took his own life by hanging himself. His sisters told me he was in pain everyday and he just wanted to be out of the pain.  He is buried with his parents at St. James Cemetery. Waverly.  Mary died in

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of Bridget O'BRIEN: Mississippi is re-admitted into the Union on February 23, 1870;  patent granted for process producing celluloid on July 12, 1870;  Marconi patented the radio in Great Britain on June 2, 1896;  birth of Tommy Dorsey on November 10, 1905;  birth of David Niven on March 1, 1910;  Fidel Castro begins Cuban revolution on July 26, 1953.

 

     Bridget O'BRIEN and John CAHILL had the following child:

 

        56     i.      Catherine C.5 CAHILL was born in Waverly, Tioga Co. NY USA 25 January 1910.  Catherine died 14 December 1987 in Riverside, Burlington NJ US, at 77 years of age.  Her body was interred 17 December 1987 in St. Peter's GY, Riverside NJ USA.  She married Edgar Franklin IMHOFF in Riverside, Burlington NJ US, 26 December 1936.  Edgar was born in Philadelphia, PA USA 21 November 1908.  Edgar died 31 March 1957 in Riverside, Burlington NJ, at 48 years of age.  His body was interred 4 April 1957 in St.Peter's, Riverside NJ USA. 

                        Catherine's occupation: Teacher.  She was christened in St. James, Waverly NY USA, circa 1910.  She married Edgar Franklin Imhoff, 26 Dec 1936, in Riverside, Burlington NJ US. Catherine was only three years old when her father died at home.  The next morning her sister Margaret went into her bedroom to tell her father had gone away and wouldn't be back.  Margaret said Catherine was too young to understand and she grabbed Margaret's had and led her through the house looking for her father.  Margaret had to open all the closet doors and look under the bed to show her father wasn't hiding on her.  The day of the funeral Margaret told me she and Uncle Stephen O'Brien were walking down the church isle holding young Catherine's hands, and at this time she made a promise to God that she would always protect Catherine.  She kept her promise until she died in 1985.  Catherine was always a visitor to the Buffalo area.  She and her Uncle jack's daughters Mary and Kate would have great times as children.  Catherine finished high school in Riverside and she went on to Temple University in Philadelphia, PA for a teaching degree.  Catherine taught school in Riverside, NJ. During the mid 1930's she meet and fell in love with Edgar "Bud" Imhoff.  They were wed in 1936 and soon had a home built down the street from her mother and Margaret..  Bud and Catherine were very proud of their home.  Bud was stricken with Cancer and died in 1963.  Catherine missed him dearly and never a day went by that she didn't talk about her Dear Bud.  After Bud's death, Catherine continued to teach and she made a trip to Ireland.  This was something she always wanted to do and she finally did.  She stayed in Ennis at the Old Ground Hotel and hired a taxi service to take her out to the O'Brien farm in Killernan.  There she found a nice neat white thatched cottage with James O'Connor and his family living there.  They were very good to her and made her visit very memorable.  She also visited her cousins the Cahills and Sextons on her visit.  One summer holiday Catherine visited Buffalo with her cousin Mary Ryan Hartigan and sister, Margaret Cahill.  Catherine wanted Mary Hartigan to meet all the O'Brien cousins.  I remember being on my best behavior this day with all those "proper" ladies and my Aunt Mary, Sister Aloysia

                  

                  

                  

                    

  

  Family of John and Molly O'Brien 36 Peabody Street, Buffalo, NY John S., Edward P., Molly, Thomas H., John J., and Catherine T.

 

      36.  John J.4 O'BRIEN (Stephen3, James2, John1) was born Killernan townland, County Clare, Ireland circa 1875.  John died 10 May 1959 in Mercy Hospital, Buffalo, Erie Co., NY USA, at 83 years of age.  His body was interred circa 1959 in Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, Erie Co., NY. 

 

      He married Mary Margaret MORONEY in Blessed Sacrement RC Church, Buffalo, Erie County, NY, 12 August 1908.  Mary was born Miltown Malby, County Clare, Ireland 1 April 1879.  Mary was the daughter of Thomas MORONEY and Catherine CONOLE.  Mary died 23 December 1942 in Mercy Hospital, Buffalo, Erie Co., NY USA, at 63 years of age.  Her body was interred circa 1942 in Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, Erie Co., NY. 

 

      John's occupation: Stationary-eng.  He was christened in Kilmurry-Ibrickane Parish, County Clare, Ireland, 23 October 1875.  John immigrated, 23 May 1900. Destination: destination unknown.  He was listed as a resident in the census report in 197 Front Street, Buffalo, NY, 1 June 1905.  .   The first census record for John living in Buffalo, is the :1 Jun 1905, New York State Census.  He was living at 197 Front Street, Buffalo, NY with his brother Stephen O'Brien.  He immigration: 23 May 1900, through NYC, NY USA on the SS Ivernia. sailing from Cobh or Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland.  On the ships manifest John is listed as having twenty dollars and he was going to stay with his sister Bridget O'Brien in Elmira, NY  (Order Admitting to Citizen ship County Court of Erie Co. 7 July 1907). Occupation: Stationary-engineer. On April 7, 1904 John O'Brien solemnly swore that it was his bona fide intention to become a Citizen of the United States of America. John filed his Declaration of Intention with the State of New York, County Court, County of Erie. At this time he was residing at 197 Front Avenue, Buffalo, NY. He stated on his petition that he emigrated to this country, and on or about the 23rd of May 1900 at the port of New York. James P. Kane of 234 Trenton Street and JohnJ. Sullivan of 227 Niagara Street submitted affidavits in the matter of John O'Brien to be admitted to become a citizen of the United States of America. Citizenship was granted July 7, 1906 by Hon. Edward K. Emery, County Judge.  John lived in Elmira, NY with his sister, Bridget and brother, Stephen before he moved to Buffalo, NY. Delia and Stephen had emigrated to the United States five years earlier. The O'Brien's were living in Elmira, NY because the Cahill's, were their cousins living there. There were railroad jobs for John and Stephen and Delia worked as a domestic. The Cahill's were first cousins of theirs on their mother's side. Her sister Mary O'Halloren married Martin Cahill of the same parish. John was only in Elmira a few years before he moved to Buffalo. Buffalo was a big "Clare Town" and there were many families from the parish and towns in West Clare where the O'Briens were from. John's first job was working on the new Bethlehem Steel Plant in Lackawanna, NY. After this and the time of his citizenship he was working as a fireman.       There is a story that was told about John's first trip to Buffalo.  John was working on the railroad as a fireman.  At this time they still used steam locomotives and the engine's boilers had to be feed by shovel.  This was John's and a friend of his job.  On this particular trip John and his friend were having too much fun and drink and somehow they broke the shovels, lost them, or burned them up  and the train came to a halt on the route to Buffalo from Elmira.  John and his friend were dismissed on the spot from their duties.  John was too embarrassed to return to Elmira so he stay in Buffalo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John and Mary Margaret O'Briens wedding picture 1908

 

 

 

Gas Works on Genesee St. He married Mary Margaret Moroney, daughter of Thomas Moroney and Catherine Conole, on 12 Aug 1908, in Blessed Sacrement, Buffalo NY USA. Born, 1 Apr 1879, in Miltown Malby, Co. Clare EIRE. Died, 23 Dec 1942, in Mercy Hospital, Buffalo NY USA. Christened, 3 Apr 1879, in Kilfarboy, Co. Clare EIRE. Burial: circa 1942, in Holy Cross GY, Lackawanna NY. Immigration: circa 1900, in NYC, NY USA. Occupation: housewife.  Mary Margaret Moroney had a twin sister Bridget; they were the second and third child of 10 children. Their birth was never recorded with the vital statistics office and the information on their birth is from St. Joseph's R. C. church in Miltown Malby. Her father was a farm laborer on her grandparent's, Michael Conole's and Bridget Gorman's farm in Islandbawn, a few miles North East of Miltown Malby. This is how her mother Catherine Conole met her father. Her parents lived in Miltown Malby and her father worked as a laborer and a jarvy car driver for the West Clare Railroad. Margaret spent most of her youth on the Conole farm with her grandparents. When she was old enough to work she got a position as a domestic servant with the Matthews family. The Matthews were the rent collectors and had a large estate in the townland of Kildimo. Her older brother, Thomas also worked on this farm as a farm hand. He was very capable and had a reputation as the best horse and dog trainer in the parish. Martin Cahill of Kildimo told me everything he knew about farm machinery he learned from Thomas Moroney. Margaret was the first of the Moroney family to emigrate to America. Her uncle Paddy Conole was living in Buffalo, NY and she made the trip in 1900. Paddy Conole was here because his mother, Bridget Gorman had family living in Buffalo and Buffalo was a "Boom Town" at the turn of the century. In fact the Pan American Exposition was held here shortly after Margaret arrived. It was a this exposition that President McKinley was assassinated. In Buffalo she worked as a domestic on Buffalo's DelawareAvenue the prominent area with the large homes. As I said Mary Margaret was the first but not the last in her family. Paddy, Elizabeth, Catherine, Michael, Bridget, Anne, and Ellen Moroney followed her to America. John  and Molly as most people called her first lived on Elk Street and attended St. Stephens Church also on Elk Street.  They were listed in the 1901 Federal Census along with their first daughter, Mary Margaret O'Brien.  Before John was married to Molly he was working as a stationary Engineer at the hotel Iroquois in downtown Buffalo, NY.  Molly didn't like him working there as she considered the clientele at the hotel not the best citizens in the community.  One day a cousin of Margaret's through the Gorman side of the family, Paddy Maddigan asked Molly when she and her man were going to get married.  Molly told him as soon as he gets a respectful job.  Maddigan a forman at the Atlas Refinery told her to send him down for a job.  This Molly did and John went to see paddy Maddigan and John secureda job at the refinery.  The wedding date was set but there was a delay.  When John received his first pay check he went to Gormans Saloon to celebrate.  The drinks were going down good when someone started to play Irish music.  John got up to dance a jig when the bar room floor gave way to John's dancing.  John's foot crashed through the floor and he broke his foot and ankle.  This put John in the hospital for and on his  back for awhile. Molly told her son, John S. that it was at this time when She and John became very close to each other and they made all their future plans over the hot homemade soup she would bring to John every evening after work.  John signed up for social security sometime after 1937 after only paying into it for a short time.  He collected for the next twenty years.  He was only retired a few years before Molly died from cancer in December 1942.  John and his son lived as bachelors for a few years and John thought about going back to Ireland and living on his American pension but decided he couldn't go back.  John was getting use to the comfortable American life with indoor plumbing and central heating.  When his son, John S. got married in May 1945, John was 70years old. At this time he decided to give his house to his youngest son Edward and his wife Dorothy and live with them.  Not long after this the house was moved for industrial expansion to another location in the neighborhood.  Here John had a full basement with central heating.  One of the first in the neighborhood.  This was John's home for the next few years until another expansion of the company and then the family moved out to a three acre country setting in West Seneca in September 1951.  Here John lived there until may of 1959 when he died

 

 

 

 Historical events during the life of John J. O'BRIEN: birth of Carl Jung on July 26, 1875;  Verney Cameron is 1st European to cross equitorial Africa from sea to sea on November 7, 1875;  birth of Dennis Gabor, inventor of holography (3D laser photography) on June 5, 1900;  Lewis and Clark Exposition opens in Oregon on June 1, 1905;  birth of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th President (1963-1969) on August 27, 1908;  birth of Benny Goodman, swinger on May 30, 1909;  patent granted for an insect electrocutor (bug zapper) on November 8, 1910;  1st Mack Sennett "Keystone Comedy" movie is released on September 23, 1912;  Italy declared war on Turkey on August 21, 1915;  birth of John Presper Eckert, co-inventor of 1st electronic computer (ENIAC) on April 9, 1919;  the monkeys Able and Baker survived a US space shot on May 28, 1959;  President Sukarno of Indonesia makes himself dictator on July 5, 1959.

 

     John J. O'BRIEN and Mary Margaret MORONEY had the following children:

 

        57     i.      Mary Margaret5 O'BRIEN was born in Buffalo, Erie County, NY, USA 30 May 1909.  Mary died 15 December 1971 in Mercy Hospital, Buffalo, Erie Co., NY USA, at 62 years of age.  Her body was interred 18 December 1971 in Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, Erie Co., NY.  Mary's occupation: Mercy Nun.  She was christened circa 1909.  .  Mary was the first child of John and Molly O'Brien.  She was baptized at St. Stephens and the family was living on Elk Street for the 1910 census.  Mary went to St. Monica's elementary school and on to South Park High School, then transferred to Mount Mercy High school where she graduated form.  Her first job after high school with the telephone company as an operator.  In October of 1929 Mary joined the Sisters of Mercy Convent a Roman Catholic religious order headquartered in Buffalo, NY.  The night before Mary was to enter the convent there was a big party held at her parents home.  All the aunts and uncles were there and the celebration was going on late into the night.  Mary's great Uncle Paddy Conole had his last dance with Mary and he left the party to walk his lady friend home.  When Paddy crossed the street he was hit and killed by a taxi cab.  This was a big loss to the Moroney family.  In the Mercy Convent Mary took the religious name, Aloysia.  Mary attended Canisus College where she received her undergraduate degree in education.  Mary taught school in many of Buffalo's Catholic elementary schools.  She also taught in Olean, NY and Batavia, NY.  Mary was in constant contact with her family as she delighted in keeping up and sharing the news.  It was Mary's phone and address book that gave me all the addresses of the cousins in Ireland and around the country.  As all the O'Brien children grew up; Aunt Mary would make the veils for the First Holy Communions and provided the nieces and nephews with their first prayer book and rosary.  After the Vatican II Ecumenical Council held in the early 1960's the religious orders laws and rules were changed to give more personal freedoms to the nuns and priests.  After this Sister Aloysia cold visit more often and even stay over night with her family.  She took trips to Riverside, NJ to visit the Cahill's and stayed with her "Brown-eyed baby brother's" family in West Seneca.  In the early 1960's Mary's health started to fail and the doctors sent her to Georgetown University Hospital near Washington DC for an examination.  There Mary had open-heart surgery and had a heart valve replaced.  This was a new surgery at the time and Mary came through without any problems.  When we were young children Mary would let us put our ear to her chest so we could hear the ball open and close the chamber in her heart.  May was very kind and loving to all the nieces and nephews and every greeting and good-by was a hug and kiss.  Mary was a regular visitor to our home and we treated her like one of the family.  My cousin, Colleen O'Brien Sylvis remarked about this years later that when she would visit her Aunt Mary she was shocked at how her Uncle Eddie's kids would climb all over Aunt Mary and pull her habit off to see how short her hair was or what she was wearing underneath her religious habit.  IN the early 1970's Mary's health started to decline.  Mary lost weight and ended up in Mercy Hospital.  Mary died in December 1973.  She was waked at the Mercy Convent on Abbott Road, South Buffalo.  She had a black felt coffin and there was only one flower piece from the "Open-Hearts Club" an organization for people that had at the time the rare procedure of open heart surgery.  It was a very large funeral with over fifty cars following to Holy Cross Cemetery in Lackawanna, NY.  I can remember my father saying how proud Aunt Mary would have been at her own funeral.  Fr. Crumlish said the funeral mass and eulogy and said Mary was going home for Christmas.  There wasn't a dry eye in the church.

    + 58    ii.      Catherine Terese O'BRIEN was born 22 October 1910.

        59   iii.      John Stephen O'BRIEN was born in Buffalo, Erie County, NY, USA 3 September 1912.  John died 19 December 1995 in 135 Jewett Ave, Buffalo, NY, at 83 years of age.  His body was interred 22 December 1995 in Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, Erie Co., NY.  He married Kathleen M GEARY in St Louis's, Buffalo NY USA, 25 May 1946.  Kathleen was born in Buffalo, Erie County, NY, USA 4 August 1908.  Kathleen is the daughter of Patrick Bernard GEARY and Mary Susan SCHUSLER. 

                        John's occupation: Army Corp Eng.  He was christened in St Stephen's, Buffalo NY USA, 22 September 1912.  . His funeral Mass was from St. Mark's.  He was buried  on  22 Dec 1995, in Holy Cross Graveyard, Lackawanna NY (Section 00, Lot 28 (next to parents)). John's occupation was with the  Army Corp of Engineers where he retired form in 1972. He married Kathleen M Geary, daughter of Patrick Bernard Geary and Mary Susan Schusler on 25 May 1946, in St. Louis's, Buffalo NY USA.  John was the eldest son of John and Mary Margaret O'Brien. When John was school age he ;attended St. Monica's Elementary School.  St. Monica's was built a few years after John was born and the family stared attending this new parish.  John played sports in the neighborhood fields and was active as the Boy's Club on Babcock Street in the "old neighborhood".  As good as John was at sports he always said that when the kids were choosing up sides for a game. His older sister, Kate was always picked before him.  He said Kate was a natural and could do anything she tried.  John remembers when his favorite Uncle pat Moroney married NoraO'Dea.  He said that it was a rainy day and all the kids came home from school for lunch.  The kids didn't want to miss the excitement of the wedding so Kate suggested that on the way back to school that they all run through the rain puddles and get wet and report back home all wet unable to go to school.

                  

                   John & Kathleen O'Brien wedding picture       This they did and they were able to witness all the preparations and excitement of the wedding.  John told me as a young man that many times there would be a knock at the door and when he would answer the door some new Irish immigrant would hand him a letter introducing himself.  Some one from back home in the parish in Ireland would recommend that they stop at the O'Briens' in Buffalo and get help from them.  Of course the guest was welcomed and he was given a place to stay and made comfortable until further arrangements could be made.  John was a good student and he graduated from South park High School about 1930.  When John was in 9th. Grade, his mother, sister, Mary and himself went for a ride in the country with a cousin of their mothers.  The car was owned by Thomas Gorman. There were few cars  in the mid 1920's and it was a real treat to be asked to go for a ride in a car.  The drive was out in West Seneca which was the "country" back then.  As they enjoyedtheir ride the car was hit by a train as it crossed the railroad tracks.   The accident happened on Langner Road.  This road now  doesn't cross the tracks.  John sustained the worst injuries and had a compound fracture of his femur.  An infection started in his bone and took many years to heal. John was in Mercy hospital for many months.  After school John joined the Civilian Conservation Corps, CCC.  He was assigned to work on the Tennessee Valley Project.  This was during the Great Depression and he was grateful to have this opportunity.  There he worked as a medic.  There were a number of other young men from the neighborhood in Buffalo that enlisted with John at the same time so he wasn't lonely and had a good time.  John never learned to drive a car but was great at directions and reading a road map.  He and Kathleen went on many trips together.  The Peeks of Otter on the Blue Ridge Skyway was a favorite. They also went to Ireland twice, Hawaii, Spain and Morocco.  John was an avid reader and there wasn't much he did not have an interest in. After he retired he volunteered at the Buffalo Zoo and worker as a docent giving tours to school groups.  Many times he was there to intersect one of the O'Brien nieces and nephews on a school outing.  John had a large interest in the family. He valued family relationships and was always ready to support the many nieces and nephews. Kathleen and John were very generous with their savings and many times helped out one of John's brother or sisters during financial difficulty. John's claim to fame was that he attended every christening, first Holy Communion, school graduation, or wedding he was invited to - no matter what the weather was Kathleen would drive him there!  This book is dedicated to John S. O'Brien because it was his influence upon me and the stories he told me that I share with you in the History of the  of Killernan.

                  

                    

    + 60   iv.      Thomas Hugh O'BRIEN was born 2 August 1915.

    + 61    v.      Edward Patrick O'BRIEN Sr was born 6 April 1919.