Research by Karen Rourk

San Jose, California

 

Leake-Leak in Derbyshire, England

 

McCrea, Kenneth D. Pennsylvania Land Applications. Volume I: East Side Applications 1765-1769. Pennsylvania Chapter, Palatines to America. The book is hard covered, printed on acid free 8.5 by 11 inch paper, and contains 562 pages. The price is $40.00. plus $4.00 shipping and handling. <http://reamstown.org/al/>

 

Camin, Betty and Edwin. North Carolina Bastardy Bonds. Transcribed by: Betty & Edwin Camin.

252 Pages, 8.5"x11", Full Name Index, Perfect Bound, NC-0144, $35.00.

 <http://www.mountainpress.com/books/nc/details/nc-0144w.html>

 

Chappelear, George Warren, 1889‑ . The Leake family and connecting lines. Dayton, VA: The Shenandoah Press, 1932. iii, 84 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Series: Families of Virginia ; v. 1. Includes index. Per.Sub.: Leake family. Subject: Virginia -- Genealogy. Southern States -- Genealogy. Mississippi -- Genealogy. Call No. 929.2/L47c.

 

Leake, Stephen Martin, 1702-1773. Life of Captain Stephen Martin, 1666-1740; ed. by Clements R. Markham. [London] Printed for the Navy Records Society, 1895. Related Names: Markham, Clements R. (Clements Robert), Sir, 1830-1916 ed. xxxix, 223 p. pl. 25 cm. Notes: "This ’Life of Captain Martin’ has remained in manuscript until now. It is complied from the captain’s own journals [by his son]"—Introd. Subjects: Leake, Stephen Martin, 1666-1736. Series: Navy Records Society (Great Britain) Publications, v. 5. LC Classification: DA70 .A1 vol. 5. Other System No.: (OCoLC)2018614.

 

Leake, Stephen Martin, 1702-1773.  The life of Sir John Leake, knt., admiral of the fleet, &c., by Stephen Martin-Leake. London, Printed 1750. viii, 464 p. fold. map, fold. tables. 24 cm. Notes: Binder’s title: Historical memoirs. Privately printed, 50 copies only. Subjects: Leake, John, Sir, 1656‑1720.  Spanish Succession, War of, 1701-1714. Admirals--Great Britain--Biography. Great Britain--History, Naval--Stuarts, 1603-1714. EnglandLondon. Series: Historical memoirs ; no. 106. LC Classification: DA87.1.L4 L4. Other System No: (OCoLC)21967250.

 

Leake, Stephen Martin, 1702-1773. The life of Sir John Leake, rear-admiral of Great Britain / by Stephen Martin Leake. Edited by Geoffrey Callender. [London] : Navy Records Society, 1920. 2 v. : ill. ; 23 cm. LC Classification: DA70 .A1 vol. 52-53.

 

Lorente, Arline Tatum. Our families and kin, now and then : Blackburn, Franck, Leake, and Thornton / by Arline Tatum Lorente. [Richmond, Va.] : A.T. Lorente, 1985. 181 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. LC Classification: CS71.B6365 1985.

 

Woodson, Henry Morton. Historical genealogy of the Woodsons and their connections / compiled and published by Henry Morton Woodson; supplement by Grace Woodson Curd. Roanoke, Va.: G.W. Curd, 1990. Related Title: Woodsons and their connections. 2 v. (760 p.) : ill. ; 22 cm. Notes: Cover title: Woodsons. Spine title: Woodsons and their connections. Originally published: Memphis : H.M. Woodson, 1915. Includes indexes. Subjects: Woodson family. LC Classification: CS71.W889 1990b. Dewey Class No.: 929/.2/0973 20.[1] WOODSON, JUDITH LEAKE, page 109.

 

Spence, Mac. The history of Leake County, Mississippi : its people and places / compiled by Mac and Louise Spence ; sponsored by the Leake County Historical Society and the Chamber of Commerce. Dallas, Tex.: Curtis Media Corp., c1984-. v. <1> : ill. ; 32 cm. ISBN: 0881070270. Includes index. Subjects: Leake County (Miss.)--History. Leake County (Miss.)--Biography. Leake County (Miss.)--Genealogy. LC Classification: F347.L4 S66 1984. Dewey Class No. 976.2/653 19.

 

"Nottinghamshire, Nottingham, or Notts, north-midland county of England, bounded N. by Yorkshire, E. by Lincolnshire, S. by Leicestershire, and W. by Derbyshire; greatest length, N. to S., about 50 miles; greatest breadth, E. to W., about 25 miles; area, 527,752 acres, population 391,815. ... The soil is varied, but cannot be spoken of as being highly productive. Green crops are the principal growth, and the common cereals are cultivated. Hop plantations are numerous, while in proximity to Nottingham and Newark there are many market gardens. Magnesian limestone and old red sandstone overlying coal prevail in the W.; in the other districts are formations of marl, new red sandstone, and lias, with quartz and gravel in the Forest. In a few places coal is worked. The principal manufactures are laces of various descriptions, in recent years a great development being apparent in the production of lace curtains. Hosiery manufacturers, woollen mills, cotton mills, and iron foundries are also actively productive. Nottinghamshlre comprises 6 wapentakes, 273 pars. with parts of 5 others, the parliamentary and municipal borough of Nottingham (3 members), and the municipal borough of East Retford and Newark. It is almost entirely in the diocese of Southwell."[2] [Bartholomew's Gazetteer of the British Isles, 1887.]

 

INFORMATION RELATED TO ALL OF NOTTINGHAMSHIRE[3]

 

"Cotham is a small village on the east bank of the Devon, 4 miles south of Newark. It contains 98 inhabitants, and 1,210 acres of land valued at £1,700, all belonging to the Duke of Portland, who is the impropriator and patron of the church, which is dedicated to St Michael. The church was partly rebuilt, a porch being added, and new pewed in 1832. The living is a donative valued at £35, and is now enjoyed by the Rev. John Ince Maltby of Shelton. This place was long the seat of the knightly families of LEEK[4] and Markham, but it is now divided into three farms, occupied by John Booth, William Hodgkinson and Thomas Rose, the latter of whom resides at Cotham Lodge, a pleasant residence, commanding fine prospects."[5] [White's Directory of Nottinghamshire, 1853.]

 

South Wingfield Manor[6]

As Derbyshire emerged from the Dark Ages and towns with markets like Chesterfield began to attract a population of artisans and traders during the early Middle Ages, prosperous merchants and churchmen became attracted to the county. One of the most eminent of these was Thomas Cromwell, at one time the richest and most powerful man in England, who built South Wingfield Manor.

 

 

Wingfield Manor - Cromwell’s Palace

The evocative and hauntingly beautiful ruins of Wingfield Manor stand proudly atop a rocky hill above the village of South Wingfield, with the tall chimneys and gaunt towers rising resolutely to two hundred feet above the valley floor, and dominating the surrounding pastoral landscape.

 

This was the romantic setting for scenes from the films, `The Virgin & the Gypsy’ and Zefferelli’s adaptation of `Jane Eyre’, also the ruins have been featured in the TV series, `Peak Practice’ – but most famously, Mary Queen of Scots was held prisoner here on three separate occasions during the sixteenth century.

 

Standing at the top of the battlemented High Tower and gazing out at the wide panorama of rich countryside whilst listening to the screeching call of the peacocks in the apple orchard far below, as Mary herself may have done almost five hundred years ago, gives one a sense of the immensity and splendour of this magnificent sprawling ruin, displayed in all its picturesque glory almost a hundred feet below. What you can now see is only the end result of a long history of building on the site, which began soon after the Norman Conquest, when a small castle enclosed by a courtyard wall was built here early in the twelfth century. Three hundred years later in 1429, following a lawsuit against Sir Henry Pierrepoint, the ownership of the site and surrounding land was granted to Ralph, Lord Cromwell of Tattershall Castle in Lincolnshire.

 

Cromwell was a man of great power and influence, who as a young man had accompanied King Henry V on his campaigns in France. He fought at Agincourt, and when the king later died, Cromwell was one of the knights chosen to accompany his body back to England.

 

The Ruler of England!

Henry V1 was only nine months old when he became king, and Cromwell became a member of the Regency council appointed to rule England. He was later appointed Lord Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Master of the Royal Hounds & Falcons under King Henry V1.

 

Cromwell, who was also Constable of Nottingham Castle and Steward of Sherwood Forest immediately demolished the earlier buildings, levelled the site, and built a structure befitting the richest and most powerful man in England at that time – not another castle, nor a manor or fortified house – but a palace.

 

At the time of its construction Cromwell’s palace at Wingfield was one of the largest and most lavish in the entire realm. It was a statement of power and wealth, designed and built to impress. The gatehouse alone was the size of a small castle - and larger than the homes of all but the richest in the land!

 

By 1439 he had built the Great Hall, kitchen, and a series of lodgings at the centre of the old enclosure, and whilst the War of the Roses was raging Cromwell spent huge sums adding a new hall and ranges of lodgings to the south and east, which, with a private garden to the north, enclosed a new double courtyard complex. His household consisted of over a hundred attendants and servants, and there were upwards of two hundred people residing within the walls. Cromwell modified as he built, and this often involved partial demolition of work which had only just been completed, thus he added the High Tower across the south-western corner of the new ranges, and by the time of its completion the immense structure was among the very largest courtyard palaces in England.

 

In considering the grandeur and magnificence of the undertaking it should be remembered that in the fifteenth century there were no architects. Cromwell simply explained what he wanted, and the detailed planning was done by master masons working under the supervision of a clerk of works. Stones were cut and shaped to exact specifications at ground level, then hoisted up in slings, baskets or giant pincers as the height increased, in some places to five stories. They had to fit exactly, and it was all worked out with nothing more sophisticated than a plumb line, set square, and a pair of compasses. It is estimated that there were up to seventy five masons employed in the construction, which was almost completed by the time of Cromwell’s death in 1456.

 

The History of the Manor House

Cromwell died in residence, and JOHN TALBOT, the second Earl of Shrewsbury, who was staying there at the time, purchased the manor and it stayed in his family for several generations. It was one of his descendants, the sixth Earl, GEORGE TALBOT, husband of the famous Bess of Hardwick, who had the charge of Mary Queen of Scots here, complete with her retinue of ‘ten maid-servants, fifty other persons, and ten horses’ on three separate occasions – in 1569/70, 1584 and 1585 - during her long imprisonment under the orders of Queen Elizabeth 1st.

 

According to guide books and local legend, it was to here that Anthony Babbington of nearby Dethick came, disguised as a gypsy, his face stained with walnut juice, in a failed attempt to hatch a plot to assassinate Elizabeth and to put Mary on the throne of England. The ancient walnut tree which stands in the inner courtyard is said to have grown from a kernel dropped by Babbington himself – prior of course, to his execution in 1586! However, in reality Babbington never visited the Scottish Queen whilst she was kept at Wingfield and was only involved in the `plot’ whilst Mary was imprisoned at Chartley, over the border in neighbouring Staffordshire, and following her departure from both Wingfield and Tutbury Castle.

 

According to Mary’s biographer, Lady Antonia Fraser, Antony Babbington and Mary Queen of Scots never actually met. This may well be true, but the possibility must be acknowledged when considering the fact that the young Antony Babbington was a page in the employ of the Earl of Shrewsbury, that they could possibly have been at Wingfield Manor at the same time. In his confession, Babbington denied ever meeting Mary in person, but is said to have confessed to `falling under her spell’. He suffered a savage end; he was hung, but cut down whilst still alive; his private parts were sliced off and placed in his mouth; he was then disembowelled, before being `quartered’, and his severed head was displayed on a spike. Mary herself was executed at Fotheringay Castle early the following year.

 

During the Civil War, Wingfield was held successively by the Earl of Pembroke on behalf of Parliament and by the Earl of Newcastle for the King. In 1644 it came under tremendous bombardment from a large Parliamentary force, who only broke the siege after calling in heavy artillery, and following its capture the building was `slighted’, meaning that it was rendered defenceless by its partial demolition.

 

After the Civil War Wingfield Manor was sold to the Haltons who repaired the main buildings around the Great Hall, inserting floors and windows, and occupying that area for the next hundred years, with the rest slowly collapsing into ruin around them. It was here, on 23rd June 1675 that the world witnessed the dawn of a new scientific age when renowned mathematician and astronomer Immanuel Halton made his famous observations on the eclipse of the sun. His findings were greeted with great acclaim and later published by the Royal Society.

 

In 1774 the Haltons built a new manor house half a mile away down the valley, using stone from Cromwell’s now crumbling palace. They stripped lead and timbers from the roof and floors, leaving virtually the ruins that we see today – except that part of the original south wing was left to the occupation of farmers.

 

The atmosphere inside the empty shell of the roofless Great Hall, with its double-tiered row of gothic arched windows, surrounded by soaring turrets and towering walls open to the sky, is redolent with the age of centuries and rich with the romance of legend and history. Beneath the Great Hall lies the Undercroft, still completely intact, with a vaulted ceiling of multiple arches supported on stone pillars, and probably the finest example of a medieval storehouse cellar still in existence.

 

The former grandeur of the State Rooms can now only be imagined by standing amidst their ruined splendour, and the spiral staircases with their stone steps worn down and bowed by the passage of feet for over half a millennium, which lead to open spaces where oak-beamed floors used to be, stand in mute testament to the former opulence and glory of Cromwell’s magnificent fifteenth century palace.

 

Today a farmer, Mr. Critchlow, still occupies a working farm at the centre of the complex, and though the ruins are in the care of English Heritage, who have done a wonderful job of conservation which has enabled Wingfield Manor to be opened up again to the public, this has only been possible with Mr. Critchlow's permission and visitors are kindly requested to respect his privacy. Audio and guided tours are available, with concessions for children and coach parties, and a visit to this hauntingly beautiful romantic ruin makes a wonderfully historic day out.

 

Derbyshire has many other notable country houses, including the sheer magnificence of perhaps the most splendid of all English Country Houses at Chatsworth, home of the Duke & Duchess of Devonshire, but it has no more splendid ruin that that of Wingfield Manor.

 

However, there is another architectural gem from a later age which stands in ruins near Chesterfield.

 

Sutton Hall – Sutton Scarsdale

 

In its heyday Sutton Hall at Sutton Scarsdale was one of Derbyshire’s, if not England’s finest classical country houses, rivalling Chatsworth in size and splendour after it was rebuilt by NICHOLAS LEKE, Earl of Scarsdale in 1724.[7]

 

Now devoid of warmth, roofless and open to the elements, the Hall retains an immense sense of the dignity and grandeur of it’s former opulence, and an aura of early Georgian splendour still haunts the expansive and romantically evocative ruins which stand stately and proud in modern-day dereliction at the heart of a once great, lavish country estate overlooking the Vale of Scarsdale.

 

The rows of empty windows beneath the Corinthian Order and Central Pediment, which bears the Earls of Scarsdale coat of arms, stare like sightless eyes eastward toward the rising sun – and directly across the valley to the white limestone eminence of Bolsover Castle on the hillside opposite.

 

During the Civil War the two houses were occupied by opposing forces, and Sutton Hall, then a Royalist stronghold, was besieged by a force of five hundred Parliamentarians led by Colonel Thomas Gell of Hopton and was eventually taken by force. Today they face each other passively across the valley, both managed by English Heritage, and displaying themselves like architectural grande dames to the thousands who pass by every day on the M1 motorway – now, in an age of air pollution and acid rain, the common enemy of such stone-built relics from a bygone age.

 

Though the castle, which crouches like a lion atop the magnesium limestone spur across the valley at Bolsover may appear more resplendent, it’s smaller and less conspicuous neighbour, a couple of miles westward across the valley, has a longer and perhaps more interesting pedigree.

 

There has been a Hall here at Sutton Scarsdale for over a thousand years and the present ruin is perhaps the fourth or fifth house to be built in this magnificent setting.

 

The original Hall formed part of a Saxon estate owned by Wulfric Spott, who died in 1002 and left it in his will to the monks of Burton Abbey.

 

By the time of the Domesday Survey (1085) Sudtune is recorded as having a mill and a wood, and being in the possession of Roger de Poitou. It is later recorded that `The Lordship of Sutton-in-the-Dale was given to Peter de Hareston by Henry 3rd in 1255’.

 

In 1297, LUCIA, heiress daughter of ROBERT HARESTON married her cousin RICHARD DE GREY of Sandiacre [Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire, England] and the manor [Sutton Hall, Sutton-in-the-Dale, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England] was held by the DE GREY family for a hundred years until it was purchased by JOHN LEKE of Gotham, Nottinghamshire, England, in 1401.[8]

 

The Church of St. Mary is built onto the south side of the original courtyard of the Hall, and was rebuilt during the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries and improved several times by SIR JOHN LEKE.

 

The LEKE family was staunch royalists, and was well rewarded for their support of the crown; first JOHN LEKE was knighted by Henry 8th in Lille, and then SIR FRANCIS LEKE was created Baronet by James 1st in 1611, made Lord Deincourt in 1624, and elevated to Earl Scarsdale by King Charles 1st in 1640. When Civil War broke out in 1642, Sir Francis fortified the original hall and defended it from repeated attacks by the Parliamentary army. Sir Francis, now Lord Deincourt, who lost two sons in battle during the Civil War, refused to surrender to Gell’s five-hundred-strong force, but the house was stormed, the defences removed and Sir Francis was taken prisoner.

 

His lands were seized by Cromwell and only restored upon forfeiture of the sum of £18,000, a fine levied by the Commonwealth for his support of the now defeated and imprisoned King Charles. It is recorded that after the execution of Charles 1st in 1649, Sir Francis was so disillusioned and in such despair that he had his grave dug, and each Friday evening, would clothe himself in sackcloth and lie in the grave to meditate and pray!

 

The LEKE family held Sutton Hall [Sutton-in-the-Dale, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England] for three hundred and thirty three years, through ten generations, until it was inherited by the fourth, and last Earl Scarsdale, NICHOLAS LEKE, and it was he who had the present Hall built in 1724. The designer and builder was the notable architect Francis Smith of Warwick, who used mostly materials from the old Hall and incorporated some of its structure into the heart of his lavish new design. A notable feature was the fine decorative plasterwork by Italian artists Artari and Vassalli, traces of which can still be seen.

 

Sadly, NICHOLAS LEKE died whilst heavily in debt due to his lavish rebuilding, and the Hall and its estates were purchased in 1740 by Godfrey Clarke of Somersall, whose son, also Godfrey, remained Lord of the Manor until 1786.

 

Sutton Hall and Estate was subsequently transferred by marriage to the Marquis of Ormonde, and following his death in 1824 it was purchased by Richard Arkwright Junior and remained in the family until it was sold at auction by William Arkwright in 1919.

 

Sadly it fell into disrepair and was sold during the 1920’s to a consortium of Chesterfield businessmen (Haslam Builders Ltd), to demolish it and use the material for building houses in Somersall and Brampton. Much of the interior, including the Adams fireplaces which were beautifully and elaborately inlaid with Blue John, and the ornate oak staircases, were purchased by a Philadelphia Museum and shipped to America. The roof was stripped of lead and the massive wooden joists removed, leaving only the shell of this once proud Georgian building.

 

By 1946 the building had deteriorated so much that demolition was scheduled, but an emergency rescue was successfully put into operation by local resident Harold Taylor, who persuaded Sir Osbert Sitwell to buy the property and to preserve the shell for eternity. It was subsequently given to the Department of the Environment and work to secure the structure from further deterioration was undertaken. This was finally completed in 1992, and now in the care of English Heritage, it is possible for visitors to walk inside the shell of Sutton Hall and to enjoy the magnificent vista across the Vale of Scarsdale – a prospect which will forever bear testimony to the vision and architectural triumph of NICHOLAS LEKE, the fourth and final Earl Scarsdale.

 

Estate Agents 1919 Sale Catalogue: Lot 37 - Sutton Hall & Grounds

“The Hall is well situate on high ground with fine views, and is a handsome classical building with fine elevations, built of stone with a lead and slate roof, with 594 acres of land attached to the Hall”.

Top Floor:

Nine bedrooms, box room, clock room and a back staircase down to the Ground floor.

First Floor:

Approached by a wide oak staircase and a secondary staircase from the centre and inner hall.

Landing:

Ballroom with oak carved ornamentation and gold and white Décor with coved ceilings and columns. Six principal bedrooms, five Secondary bedrooms and eight smaller ones. Three dressing rooms, four Bathrooms, four toilets, housemaids cupboard and an iron spiral emergency staircase to the ground floor.

 

Ground Floor:

Entrance Hall and two inner halls. Two drawing rooms, dining room, Strong room, morning room,smoking room and library with toilet, billiard room with adjoining lavatory. Servants hall, housekeepers room, servants Sitting room, butlers pantry with silver closet, kitchen, scullery, three Larders, Laundry, four store rooms, drying room, boot room, gun room and lamp room

Courtyard & Outbuildings:

Bakehouse, washhouse, oil and fuel stores, lean- to greenhouse, Dairy, stone-built brew-house containing nine storage rooms.

Stables:

Built of stone and slate; Thirteen stalls, six loose boxes, two harness rooms, Three store rooms with seven rooms above. Large Coach House and Garage fitted with furnace, boiler and hot water pipings. Four estate office rooms and Stable-Yard.

Estate Workshops/Park Buildings:

Boat House, Deer Barn, Ice House, Park Kennels, Poultry house, four loose boxes and paddock, three stores. Carpenters Shop, Paint shop, saw lodge and engine house, stable with two Stalls and loft above, two loose boxes and small yard. Cow lodge for twelve cows, fodder store, two implement and wagon sheds. Dutch barn, nine dog kennels, large yard and covered Stockyard.

Finely timbered deerpark with avenue and well stocked fish ponds and Plantation grounds. Terraced pleasure gardens, with archery, croquet lawn, tennis lawns, Octagon gardens, Cedar Garden, gold and silver borders and an Italian Yew Pergola.

Walled Kitchen Garden:

Fruit trees, six hot houses and cucumber pit frame heated from two furnaces. Five cold frames and Alpine house, brick-built Bothy, with three bedrooms, Kitchen, wash-house, earth closet, fruit store, mushroom house, potting shed, Tool shed. Adjoining the kitchen gardens are the kennels, brick-built on Arches and slate-roofed, with fourteen kennels, dog hospital, food store, fuel Store, and building store with water laid on.

 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF NOTTINGHAM[9]

By Tim Lambert

 

SAXON NOTTINGHAM

Nottingham began in the 6th century as a small Saxon settlement called ‘Snottaingham’. The Saxon word ‘ham’ meant village. The word ‘ing’ meant ‘belonging to' and ‘Snotta’ was a man. So it was the village owned by Snotta. It was inevitable that sooner of later Nottingham would grow into a town as it is the first point where the Trent can be forded but the river is also navigable this far inland.

 

In the late 9th century the Danes conquered North East and Eastern England. They turned Nottingham into a fortified settlement or burgh. Nottingham had a ditch around it and an earth rampart with a wooden palisade on top.

 

In 920 the English king recaptured Nottingham and he built a bridge across the Trent. By the 10th century Nottingham was a busy little town though with a population of only several hundred. The Western limit of the little town stood roughly where Bridlesmith Gate is today. From the 10th century Nottingham had a mint.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE MIDDLE AGES

 

In 1067 William the Conqueror built a wooden castle to guard Nottingham. (It was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century). Nottingham grew rapidly after the Norman Conquest. A new area was created between the old town and the castle. It was called the French borough because most of those who lived there were Norman French. The old town was called the English borough. The two areas had separate administrations until about 1300. The ditch and rampart around Nottingham were extended to surround the new area. Later, in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, they were replaced by stone walls.

 

Nottingham may have had a population of around 1,500 at the time of the Norman Conquest. By the 14th century it may have grown to 3,000. By the standards of the time Nottingham was a fair sized town. However it was not large or important nationally.

 

In 1155 the king gave Nottingham a charter. In the Middle Ages a charter was a document granting the townspeople certain rights. Nottingham gained its first mayor in 1284. The town gained its first sheriff in 1449.

 

In the Middle Ages Nottingham had a weekly market and an annual fair, and from 1284 it had two. In those days a fair was like a market but was it was held only once a year for a period of a few days. Buyers and sellers would come from all over Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire to attend one.

 

In the Middle Ages the main industry in Nottingham was wool manufacture. The raw wool was woven. It was then fulled. This means it was pounded in a mixture of water and clay to clean and thicken it. Wooden hammers worked by watermills pounded the wool. There were also some tilers and potters in Nottingham as well as goldsmiths.

 

There were also the same craftsmen you would find in any medieval town. These included brewers, bakers, carpenters, shoemakers and blacksmiths. There were obviously, bridlesmiths who gave a street its name and wheelwrights who did the same. Fletchergate is named after fletchers (arrow makers) who once worked there.

 

In the 13th century friars arrived in Nottingham. The friars were like monks but instead of withdrawing from the world they went out to preach. There were Franciscans known as grey friars because of their grey habits and Carmelite friars known as white friars. In the Middle Ages the church ran the only hospitals. In Nottingham there was a hospital dedicated to St Thomas. In it monks cared for the sick and the poor as best they could. There were also 2 leper hostels outside the gates, dedicated to St Leonard and St Mary.

 

In the 12th and 13th centuries there was also a Jewish community in Nottingham. However all Jews were forced to leave England in 1290.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE 16th AND 17th CENTURIES

 

In 1513 a grammar school was founded in Nottingham. However in the 1530s Henry VIII closed the leper hostels and the friaries. Robert Smythson 1535-1614 built Wollaton Hall in 1588. In Nottingham traditional industries such as the manufacture of wool declined. The pottery industry continued. Tanning declined in the late 17th century. However new industries arose to replace them. These included making silk or wool hosiery. By the late 17th century this industry was booming in Nottingham. So was a malting industry (malt, made from barley, is used in brewing.

 

A new industry in Nottingham was glass making. Glass windows were rare in the Middle Ages but they became common in the 17th century. So did brick houses. In the 1600s many of the houses in Nottingham were rebuilt in brick with tiled roofs. By the early 18th century it was an elegant town with many fine buildings.

 

Nottingham grew steadily despite outbreaks of plague, which occurred throughout the 16th and early 17th century. The last outbreak was in 1667. By 1600 Nottingham probably had a population between 3,500 and 4,000. It probably rose to about 5,000 by the late 17th century. In 1642 the civil war began when Charles I raised his standard on a hill north of Nottingham and called on men to join his cause. Nevertheless in November Parliamentarian troops occupied Nottingham. They held it for the rest of the war despite attacks by the royalist army in June 1643 and January 1644.

 

In 1651, after the war, parliament ordered that the castle should be destroyed (to prevent it ever falling into royalist hands). In 1674 The Duke of Newcastle bought the site. A mansion was built there between 1674 and 1679.

 

At the end of the 17th century the travel writer Celia Fiennes said: 'The town of Nottingham is the neatest town I have seen. It is built of stone and has delicate large and long streets much like London and the houses are lofty and well built. The Market Place is very broad - out of which run 2 very large streets'.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE 18th CENTURY

 

In the early 18th century Daniel Defoe described Nottingham as ‘one of the most pleasant and beautiful towns in England'. From the late 17th century salt glaze stoneware was made in Nottingham. In the 18th century the hosiery industry boomed. There was also a lace industry although it was quite small. Nottingham grew rapidly especially in the later 18th century. By the middle of the century the population of Nottingham had passed 10,000. By 1801, the year of the first census it exceeded 28,000.

 

By the standards of the time Nottingham was a large and important town. For the well-to-do it was elegant and genteel (although, as always, there were many poor people). In the 18th century there was a piped water supply although it was expensive and not many people could afford it. From the 1760s oil lamps lit the streets. The first theatre in Nottingham was built in 1760. A general hospital was built in 1782.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE 19th CENTURY

 

The town continued to grow rapidly, especially after 1845 when a great deal of land around it was released for building. Like all towns in the early 19th century Nottingham was a dirty, unsanitary place. There was a cholera outbreak in 1833, which killed 330 people.

 

However conditions improved in the later 19th century. Nottingham gained gas street lighting in 1819. In the mid-19th century the piped water supply was taken over by the corporation and was greatly expanded. After 1835 Nottingham had its first proper police force. A new prison was built in Nottingham in 1846.

 

The railway first reached Nottingham in 1839.

 

The first public library opened in 1868. University College was formed in 1881.

 

In the late 19th century the corporation created parks and recreation grounds. Furthermore the Goose Fair evolved from an event where people bought and sold goods to a pleasure fair.

 

Nottingham County Football Club was founded in 1862. Nottingham Forest was founded in 1865.

 

In 1831 the House of Lords rejected the Great Reform Bill which was intended to increase the number of people who could vote for MPs. The people of Nottingham were so angry they rioted. The Duke of Newcastle was opposed to reform so they burned his residence, the castle. It remained in ruins for 44 years until the town council took it over and rebuilt it as a museum and art gallery.

 

In the 19th century the hosiery industry continued. Nottingham was famous for lace. A lace-making machine was introduced in 1809. However some new industries began. John Player founded Players cigarettes in 1877. A man named Frank Bowden began making bicycles in Raleigh Street in 1887. He named his company after the street. By 1910 Raleigh were making 50,000 bicycles each year. Nottingham was made a city in 1897.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE 20th CENTURY

 

Electric trams began running in Nottingham in 1901. The last ones ran in 1936. Between 1922 and 1932 a dual carriageway was built around the city.

 

From 1928 Nottingham had a Lord Mayor. A new Council House was opened in 1929.

 

In the 1920’s and 1930s the council began building council houses. Many were built on new estates north of the city.

 

Nottingham University was founded in 1948.

 

In the 1950s and 1960s many more council estates were built in the north of the city including estates at Bilborough. Another estate was built in the south at Clifton.

 

In 1952 a statue of Robin Hood by James Woodford was erected by the castle. A new Clifton Bridge was built in 1958. The Playhouse Theatre opened in 1963. Queens Medical Centre was built in 1970. Victoria bus station was built in 1972. Broad Marsh shopping centre was built in 1972. Victoria shopping centre was built in 1975. The National Water Sports Centre opened in 1973. Stonebridge City Farm opened in 1979.

 

In the late 20th century the main industries in Nottingham were textiles, tobacco, bicycles, pharmaceuticals and printing. In 1998 Nottingham was made a unitary authority.

 

NOTTINGHAM IN THE 21st CENTURY

 

In 2003 a network of trams was created in Nottingham.

 

Today the population of Nottingham is 266,000.

 

 

SUTTON-CUM-DUCKMANTON[10] parish contains the rectory of Sutton and vicarage of Duckmanton, which were consolidated about the year 1558, and has 4,302A. 2R. 38P. of land, and in 1851, had 110 houses, and 587 inhabitants, of whom 311 were males and 276 females; rateable value £5,435.

 

SUTTON-IN-THE-DALE, a small and scattered district of farms, 4½ miles S.E. by E. from Chesterfield, and 2½ miles S. from Duckmanton, contains 1,988A. 3R. 30P. of fertile land; rateable value £2,246. Robert Arkwright, Esq., is lord of the manor and sole owner. The Church, dedicated to St. Mary, is an ancient structure with nave, chancel, north aisle, and tower with four bells, it is situated close to the Hall, a door from which communicates with the sacred edifice. In the chancel is a handsome marble tablet to

3 D 3


780                                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

Saml. Pierrepont, second son of the Hon. Geo. Pierrepont, sixth son of the Right Hon. Robert, Earl of Kingston, who died Sept. 1st, 1707, aged 56 years. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Duckmanton annexed, valued in the King’s book at £12 16s. ½d., now £309, in the patronage of Robert Arkwright, Esq., and incumbency of the Rev. Michael M. Humble, B.A. The Hall, a large handsome mansion, which was rebuilt by the late Earl of Scarsdale, stands on an eminence in a fine park of about 280 acres of land, and is the property and seat of Robert Arkwright, Esq., who has greatly beautified the house and improved the estate, having rebuilt nearly the whole of the farm buildings. This manor was given by Wulfric Spott, in the reign of Ethelred, to Burton Abbey. At Domesday survey it belonged to Roger de Poictou. In the year 1255, it was granted to Peter de Harestan. The heiress of Robert de Harestan brought it to Richard de Grey, of Sandiacre. A co-heiress of Grey, alias Hilary, brought it to the Leakes, in the reign of Henry IV., and it became the chief seat of that family. Francis Leake, of Sutton, was created a baronet in 1611, and Lord Deincourt of Sutton, in 1624. In 1643, (the beginning of April,) Lord Deincourt began to fortify his house at Sutton. Sir John Gell sent his brother, Colonel Thomas Gell, with 500 men and three pieces of ordnance to besiege it. Lord Deincourt was summoned, but refused to surrender, and for some time obstinately defended himself. The house was taken, and Lord Deincourt and his men made prisoners: the works were demolished, and Lord Deincourt set at liberty, on giving his word that he would repair to Derby within eight days, and submit himself to the parliament. Sir John Gell observes that the forfeiture of his word on this occasion, was revenged by the garrison at Bolsover, who some time afterwards, when the castle was in the hands of the parliament, plundered Lord Deincourt’s house at Sutton. In 1645, Lord Deincourt was created Earl of Scarsdale. Having rendered himself very obnoxious to the parliament, by his exertions in the royal cause, during the civil wars, his estates were sequestered; and as he refused to compound, they were sold. His son procured some friends to be pur­chasers, paying the sum of £18,000, fixed by the parliamentary commissioners as the composition. The title became extinct by the death of Nicholas, the fourth earl, in 1736. After this event, the large estates belonging to the family were sold for the payment of debts. Sutton was purchased by Godfrey Clarke, Esq., who was in possession in 1740. The sister and heiress of Godfrey Bagnall Clarke, who died in 1786, married Job Hart Price, Esq., who took the name of Clarke, and left a daughter and heiress married to the Marquis of Ormond, who occasionally resided at the Hall; of whose trustees it was pur­chased in 1824, by the late Richard Arkwright, Esq., and is now the property of Robert Arkwright, Esq. Sutton is sometimes called Sutton Scarsdale. The feast is on Whit Sunday.

DUCKMANTON, a long scattered village, running N. and S., usually designated Long, Middle, and Far Duckmanton, of which Middle Duckmanton is 4 miles E. from Chesterfield, and 2½ miles W. from Bolsover, contains 2,313A. 3R. 8P. of fertile land. Robt. Arkwright, Esq., the sole owner. Here formerly was a church, dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, at Long Duckmanton, which it is supposed was taken down about the year 1558, when this vicarage was consolidated with the rectory of Sutton. The Rectory House is a handsome brick mansion, erected in 1842, situated at a turn of the road betwixt Long and Middle Duckmanton, with 59 acres of glebe. Many of the inhabitants are employed at the collieries and iron-works in the immediate neighbourhood. Long Course, a handsome well-arranged farm house, pleasantly situated on an eminence, 1 mile S. from Duckmanton, commanding a fine view of Sutton Hall and Park, is occupied by Mr. John Norton, farm steward to Robert Arkwright, Esq. In 1856, Robert Arkwright, Esq., built on the site of the ancient church here, a large and commodious room for the use of the parish generally, and in digging for the foundation, sixteen skeletons were found, one of which measured six feet from the crown of the skull to the ancle joint, the feet not being found; in most of the skulls the teeth were quite perfect. Here are some rich beds of coal and ironstone. The manor of Duckmanton was given by Wulfrie Spott to Burton Abbey. At the Domes­day survey it belonged to Ralph Fitz-Hubert. Geoffrey Fitz-Peter purchased the manor


SUTTON-CUM-DUCKMANTON PARISH.                                   781

 

of Sir Richard de Wyverton, for Welbeck Abbey. Sir Richard Bassett gave the vill of Duckmanton to the Abbey: afterwards Henry de Stuteville confirmed Duckmanton to the Abbey. King Henry VIII. granted the manor, about 1538, to Francis Leake, Esq., since which it has passed with Sutton. The endowed school is at Duckmanton; and the feast Sunday after Midsummer day.

CHARITIES.—Sutton and Duckmanton School, in 1791, being in a ruinous state, was pulled down by the rector and trustees, and a new one built on the site, by subscription; the school is endowed with sixteen acres of land, which is supposed to have been appro­priated by the lord and freeholders of the manor, to the use of a schoolmaster, for the instruction of poor children. The school lands were let for £18 per annum, paid half-yearly to the schoolmaster, for which he taught 20 children. The 16 acres of land having been purchased by Robert Arkwright, Esq., the trustees bought 45 acres of land in the parish of Brampton, now let for £40 per year, and are now (1856) erecting a new school on the site of the old one for the education of the children in the parish; it will be a neat brick building, capable of accommodating about 80 children. Formerly 20 children were educated free for the £18, arising from rise 16 acres of land, but a charter having been obtained from the Lord Chancellor, the trustees are now authorized to charge 2d. per week for each child who attends school, for instruction in reading, writing, and arith­metic; and in order that the said charity may not be lost sight of in the said parish, the trustees for the time being, shall cause to be put up in the most public part of the pariah church, a board or slab, containing a short account of the charity, the amount of its funds, and an explanation of its object, and that such board or slab should always kept clean and legible.

Rev. John Curry, formerly rector of the parish, left by will, 1693, £20, for the use of the poor. Margaret Ronzier, gave in her lifetime £34. William Widdowson, 1735, directed that his executor should yearly lay out 12s, in the purchase of 15 loaves, to be distributed to six poor widows. Samuel Dowker, 1738, gave to the poor of Sutton and Duckmanton 10s. a year to buy bread; and 10s. to the parson, to preach a sermon on New Year’s day. The sum of £120, arising from these charities, was lent on the turnpike road from Matlock to Chesterfield. The interest having been in arrears four years, was added to the principal, in 1774, and again, in 1782, whereby it was increased to £190 16s.; the interest amounts to £2 17s. 3d., out of which the rector receives 10s. for preaching a sermon on New Year’s Day; the remainder is distributed to the poor..

Francis Leach, left for the use of the poor, 3s. yearly, issuing out of a farm in Bolsover Woodhouse, which is usually paid once in four years. The payment made of 12s., in 1823, was improperly carried to the parish account, but is now distributed in accordance with the will of the donor.

Rev. Francis Gisborne’s charity (see Bradley). The annual sum of £7 5s., received by the rector, is laid out in coarse woollen cloth and flannel, and distributed to the poor about Christmas.

(1856.) For the last thirty years, Robert Arkwright, Esq., has given annually at Christmas an ox, to be divided amongst the poor of the parish; and to which the farmers have added £5 for the purchase of bread.

 

Those marked * reside at Duckmanton.

Post Office at Alfred Bennett’s, Duckmanton. Letters arrive from Chesterfield at 8 a.m., and are despatched at 4.30 p.m.

 

Arkwright Robert, Esq., The Hall

* Brookes, William, overlooker

Broom John, gardener, The Hall

Bunting Francis, & John Freeman, millers,

  Sutton Mill and Bolsover

* Cowlishaw John, blacksmith

* Gladwin Daniel, clerk, Duckmanton Works

* Humble Rev. Michael M., B.A., Rectory

Laughton Charles, butler, The Hall

Marsh George, parish clerk

* Mills Mansfeldt F., estate agent, The Lodge

Noton John, farm steward, Longcourse

  Farm

* Oates Matth., victualler, White Swan

Pemberton Joseph, gamekeeper

* Watkinson Thomas, shoemaker

* White Wm. Mower, schoolmaster

Winfield Richard, joiner


782                                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

Farmers.

* Alsop George

* Belfield Robert

  Smithy Hill

Bradley Eliz.

* Britt William

Britt William, jun.,  

  Mill Farm

Bunting Fras., Lane

* Bunting Henry

  Hodgkinson

* Cantrill Israel

* Crofts Joseph

* Crofts William

* Smith Thomas

Gladwin John

Glossop Joseph

Hogg George

* Hole John

* Johnson Robert

* Johnson Sampson

* Johnson William

Ludlam John

Oates Matthew

* Parker Wm., Moor

Pearce Eliz., Lodge

* Pearce Leonard

* Pearce Richard

Potter Wm., Spring

* Rains Stephen

Taylor Peter, Sutton

  Farm

 

Shopkeepers.

* Alsop George, jun.

* Bennett Alfred (and

  tailor)

* Weeds Henry (and

  bricklayer)

 

TIBSHELF, a parish and considerable village, consisting of one long street, 4 miles N.N.E. from Alfreton, 8 miles S.S.E. from Chesterfield, and 18 miles N.E. from Derby; contains 2,400 acres of land, principally a loamy soil, on the Nottinghamshire border; and in 1851 had 166 houses, and 806 inhabitants, of whom 406 were males, and 400 females; rateable value, £2,415 12s. 6d. St. Thomas’s Hospital, Southwark, London, are lords of the manor, and owners of 1,750 acres of land. The Duke of Devonshire, Robert Millward, Esq., and John Chambers, Esq., are also owners. The parish abounds in coal, and besides the employment at the collieries, some of the inhabitants are employed in frame-work knitting of cotton hose. The Church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is a handsome structure, rebuilt in 1729, situated at the eastern extremity of the village, and has nave, chancel, side aisles, embattled tower, and five bells. In 1850, a beautiful painted window was put up in the chancel; the work of Miss Sharpe, of London; the subjects being St. John the Baptist, and the Four Evengelists. In the church is an ancient monument, for Ann Clarke, who died in 1699, aged 80 years. She bequeathed, by will, £20 to the poor of this parish for ever. The living is a vicarage, valued in the King’s book, £4 5s. 3d., now £172; Mrs. Packman, of Tupton Hall, the patron, and the Rev. Francis William Sharpe, B.A., the incumbent, who resides at the vicarage, a commodious house, a little west of the church. This church formerly was appropriated to the Nuns of Brewode, in Staffordshire, after which the impropriation was given to St. Thomas’s Hospital, and the large tithes have been sold by them to the landowners; the vicarial have been commuted for £185 18s. 4d. Here are 42 acres of glebe. The Parochial school is a small brick building, with one room. It is supported by voluntary contributions and the children’s pence; about 30 boys and 12 girls attend. A lodge of Odd Fellows is held at the Wheat Sheaf Inn. The manor of Tibecel, at the Domesday survey, was held by one Robert, under the King. In the reign of King John, it was in the baronial family of Heriz, from whom it passed, by successive female heirs, to Belers and Swillington. R. de Swillington was seized of it in 1429; Sir William Pierrepont was possessed of it in 1513; it was given, in 1552, to St. Thomas’s Hospital, by its founder, King Edward VI., being described as parcel of the endowment of the dissolved hospital of the Savoy. Feast, first Sunday after the 29th of June. Biggin, two farms, ¾ mile N. from Tibshelf. Doe Hill, a pleasant house, 1 mile W., was formerly noted for a medicinal spring, of which there was also a similar one at the foot of the village, both much celebrated; here the parish have an acre of ground for a stone quarry, for building purposes. At Hirst, ¾ mile N.E., is the neat mansion and seat of John Chambers, Esq. Marlpits, a farm, on high ground ½ mile E.; this place is approached by a gradual ascent, but commands a most extensive prospect; 11 parish churches can be seen with the naked eye, including Lincoln Minster, the town of Derby, Axe Edge, and the mountains of the High peak. This parish partakes of the charity of the Rev. Francis Gisborne. (See Bradley.) The sum of £7 5s. is received and distributed in coarse woollens to the poor about Christmas.

 

Post Office at Samuel Hill’s. Letters arrive from Alfreton at 10 a.m., and are despatched at 5 p.m. in winter, and 5.30 p.m. in summer.


TIBSHELF DIRECTORY.                                                    783

 

Bennett William, saddle; harness, oil

  cloth, and nail manufacturer

Brookes John, tailor

Chambers John, land surveyor and coal

  master, Hurst House

Close George, frame-work knitter

Cooke George, corn miller

Davenport James, wheelwright

Heald Mr. Robert

Hill Ann, beerhouse

Hill Charles, cowkeeper, Nethermoor

Hill Saml. and Alice, parochial school

Milward Robert, coal master, Tibshelf

  Colliery; h. Nether Moor House

Milward Robert, jun., brick and tile maker,

  and malster, Nethermoor

Reynolds Wm., working engineer, Marlpits

Sampson Mrs., draper

Sharpe Rev. Fras. Wm., B.A., vicar

 

Inns and Taverns.

Crown, Martha Ashmoor

Wheat Sheaf, William Barrett

White Hart, William Blanksby

 

Bakers.

Ford John (and corn

  miller)

Heath William

 

Blacksmiths.

Handley Robert

Haslam John, Upper

  Moor

 

Butchers.

Barrett William

Clay Sampson

Limb Robert

 

Farmers.

Adlington William,

  Littlemoor

Ashmoor Samuel (and

  maltster)

Bamford Martin

Barrett Peter

Becket Thos., Biggin

Blanksby William

Bryon Martha

Downing Joseph

Ford John

Ford Mary

Hall William, Goose

  House

Harker James

Heath Wm. (& parish

  clerk)

Heath Wm., Marlpits

Hill Rd. (and timber

  merchant)

Hill Sarah, Biggin

Hill William

Johnson Geo., Cock

  Top

Milward Robert

Morrell Matthew

Rogerson Stephen

Sampson William

Speed Jph., Cock Top

Straw William

Ward Wm., Doe Hill

Wetton Edmund

 

Shoemakers.

Coupe George

Hill Stephen

Lowe Jabez

Taylor Hy, Marlpits

Shopkeepers.

Barratt Peter

Barratt William

Brailsford Samuel

Clay Sampson

Hardwick John

Limb Robert

Milward Mary

Parker George

 

Stone Masons.

Bingham Fras.

Bingham George

 

Carrier to Chester­-

field.

John Thorpe, Sat., &

  Mansfield, Thurs.

 

WHITTINGTON is a large flourishing village and parish, 2½ miles N. from Ches­terfield, contains 1491A. 0R. 3P. of land, and in 1851, had 196 houses and 874 inhabitants, of whom 456 were males, and 418 females; rateable value, £4,185 5s. It was enclosed by an act passed 1821, the award signed March, 1825, when all the tithes and moduses were commuted. The principal owners are, John and Wm. Fowler, Esqs., the Rev. W. M. Pierce, Mr. Geo. Jenkinson, Mr. Samuel Jenkinson, Chas. Steade, Esq., J. B. Jebb, Esq., John Crusoe, Esq., and Richard Barrow, Esq. ; the two former are lords of the manor. Here are also many other small freeholders. The Church, dedicated to St. Barthlomew, is a neat stone edifice, with chancel, side aisles, and low tower. The living is a rectory, valued in the King’s book £7 10s. 10d., now £302. The Bishop of Lichfield patron. Rev. Geo. Gordon, rector; and the Rev. Robt. Robinson, M.A., resident officiating curate. In the church is the monument of the late Samuel Pegge, L.L.D., the antiquary, author of the “Life of Bishop Grossetete,” “History of Beauchief Abbey,” “Bolsover and Peak Castles,” “Dissertations on Coins and other Antiquarian Subjects.” He also collected considerable materials for a history of Derbyshire, now deposited in the Herald’s college. Dr. Pegge was 45 years rector of Whittington, where he died, Feb. 14, 1796, in the 92d year of his age: he was born at Chesterfield, 1704. In the churchyard is the monument of Chpr. Smith, Esq., of London, who left £550 to the corporation, for the relief of dis­abled and wounded seamen. In the parish register is the following remarkable entry:— “Thomas Ashton, son of Mr. Arthur and Mrs. Jane Bulkeley, was baptized July 1st, 1664. Godfathers—Edward Downes, great, great, uncle; Dr. Charles Ashton, great, great, great uncle; Joseph Ashton, gent., great, great, great uncle. Goodmothers—Mrs. Wood, great, great, great aunt; Mrs. Wainwright, great, great grandmother; Mrs. Green, great grandmother.”

At the Domesday survey, Whittington is described as a hamlet of Newbold. The paramount manor, which had been in the Peverels, was granted by King John, to Wm.


784                                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

Briewere, from whose family it passed to the Wakes. The Boythorps, Bretons, and Foljambes held it successively as mesne lords; but the immediate possession was from an early period in the family of Whittington, whose heiress married Dethick. A co-heiress of Dethick brought it, about the year 1488, to the Poles, who held it under Foljambe. Geo. Pole had two daughters, co-heiresses, who brought this manor, towards the latter part of the 17th century, in moieties to Frith and Chaworth. Frith’s moiety passed by marriage to Sir Chas. Sedley, who sold it to Mr. Richd. Gillett, who about 1813, sold his moiety to Mr. John Dixon. Three-fourths of the other moiety passed to the Launder family, also sold to Mr. Dixon. The remaining eighth belonged to the children of the late Samuel Hinde, who in 1856, sold it to Messrs. John and Wm. Fowler.

There are few places in England equally distinguished in the annals of history with the village of Whittington. When King James II. was endeavouring to assume arbitrary power, and to re-establish Popery in this kingdom, several noblemen and gentlemen of distinguished rank and fortune, met at Whittington, with a view of defeating his purpose; amongst whom were the Earls of Devonshire, and Danby, Lord Delamere, and Mr. John D’Arcy, son and heir of Conyers, Earl of Holderness; Sir Scroop How, also embarked in the execution of this great design, but it is not certain that he met them on the present occasion. Whittington Moor was the place appointed for holding their deliberations, but a shower, of rain falling at the time, they repaired to the village for shelter, and finished their consultation at a public house, the Cock and Magpie, which from this remarkable event has acquired the celebrated name of the “Revolution House.” On the 5th of Nov., 1788, the hundredth anniversary of the revolution was, on account of the above event celebrated with great splendour and magnificence at Whittington and Chesterfield. The commemoration commenced at Whittington with Divine service at the Church. The Rev. Saml. Pegge, rector of the parish, delivered a sermon, and the descendants of the illustrious houses of Cavendish, Osborne, Boothe, and D’Arcy, a numerous and powerful gentry, a a wealthy and respectable yeomanry, and an attentive peasantry, formed an audience which has seldom been equalled on any occasion. After service, the company went in succession to view the Old Revolution House, with the arm chair in which the Earl of Devonshire is said to have sat, and then partook of a cold collation, which was prepared in the new rooms annexed to the cottage. The procession to Chesterfield then began. It consisted of the members of eight Friendly societies, amounting to about two thousand persons, walking four and four, and carrying flags with mottos and devices. The band of music belonging to the Derbyshire militia. The corporation of Chesterfield, in their robes of office, joined the procession on entering the town. The following noblemen in their coaches, with attendants on horseback, joined the procession:—The Duke of Devonshire, Earl of Stamford, Earl of Danby, Lord Francis Osborne, Lord Geo. Cavendish, Lord John Cavendish, Sir Francis Molyneux, and Sir Henry Hunloke, Bart., in Sir Henry’s coach; and upwards of 40 other carriages of the neighbouring gentry, with their attendants, genty on horseback, three and three; and servants on horseback in the same manner. The whole was conducted with order and regularity; notwithstanding there were so large a number of carriages, four hundred gentlemen on horseback, and an astonishing throng of spectators, not an accident happened. All was joy and gladness, without a single burst of unruly tumult and uproar. Persons of all ranks wore orange and blue, in memory of our glorious deliverer, King William III. And the most respectable Roman Catholic families vied in their endeavour to shew how just a sense they had of the value of civil liberty. On the day previous to the jubilee, the committee appointed to conduct the pro­ceedings dined together in the Revolution House; and his Grace the Duke of Devonshire, the Earl of Stamford, Lord George and Lord John Cavendiah, with several neighbouring gentlemen were present. A subscription was entered into for erecting a monumental column on that spot where the first meeting was held, which was so highly instru­mental in rescuing the liberties of the country from perdition; however, the idea of erecting a column on Whittington Moor was afterwards given up, and the sum (£230)


WHITTINGTON PARISH.                                                 785

 

subscribed was given to the Derby infirmary. Chesterfield races are still held on Whit­tington Moor. The Wesleyan Methodists have a chapel in Whittington, erected 1828, and the Primitive Methodists have one, erected in 1849. The Endowed School,—(see charities,)—was formerly held in an old building in the churchyard, which was taken down, and in 1850, a handsome stone building was erected in its stead in the centre of the village. Brown House, is a neat mansion, half mile W. of the Church, the seat and property of Chas. Steade, Esq. Messrs. Thos. Firth & Sons, of Sheffield, are erecting extensive iron works here, close to the railway at the east end of the parish, near which a great number of cottage houses are now in course of erection.

CHARITIES.—Peter Webster, in 1674, left £200 on trust, to be invested in land for the maintenance of a schoolmaster. He also devised a messuage in the parish, and directed a sum of 36s. yearly to be given to 6 poor scholars, to buy them books, and the residue of the rents to be distributed to the poor. The property consists of a farm in Unstone, let for £23 2s., a piece of land set out at the inclosure in 1825, let for £2 2s., and two allotments on Whittington common, let for £3 per annum; the whole amounts to £30 6s., out of which £25 4s. is paid to a schoolmaster, 36s. to 6 poor scholars, and the remainder is distributed to the poor.

Joshua Webster, in 1696, devised his messuage and lands for the education of 10 poor children, in case his son, Peter Webster, should die without issue. By indenture, 1785, the said Peter Webster conveyed to trustees, for the purposes mentioned in the will, the Plumtree farm, let on lease for 99 years at a rental of £10 10s. The farm contains 21A. 2R. 33P., and the present value is stated to be £35 or £40 per annum. There is also a house let to the schoolmaster, and some allotments, belonging this estate. The school­master receives £10 10s. for teaching 10 poor children.

Poor’s Lands.—Before the inclosure there were three small parcels of land let for £1 14s. a year, which was given to the poor. Another piece of land, let for 10s. a year, was applied to put out an apprentice, in lieu of which 11A. 1R. 4P., were awarded at the inclosure, now let for £12 19s. The rents are partly reserved to pay £51 3s. 2d., the expenses of the inclosure.

Nicholas Sprentall, in 1636, gave 20s., issuing out of Hudgrave meadow, to be dis­tributed every Christmas to the poor.

Godfrey Wolstenholme, in 1682, left £25 to buy gowns, for two poor widows in Whittington. The amount was invested in land, and by the award of the commissioners, 2A. 2R. 3P. were allotted in exchange, which is let for 25s. per annum, and expended in two gowns for poor widows. The land is worth about 30s. an acre, but the tenant has laid out £50 in fencing and levelling, and consequently before the rent is advanced he ought to be repaid.

John Hind, in 1724, gave 50s., the interest to be given to the poor.

George Gilberthorpe, in 1729, left £6 for a distribution of bread, the clerk to have a share, on the six Sundays in Lent.

Elizabeth Bulkley, in 1740, gave money producing 6s. a year, this appears to be lost, as nothing has for many years been received.

Peter Webster, in 1750, gave to the minister, churchwardens, and overseers, the sum of £600 on trust, to be invested in government securities, and the dividends paid to 6 poor persons, 3 men and 3 woman, one half year in money and the other in clothes. In 1755, the amount was invested in the south sea annuities. The dividends amounting to £18 a year, are usually given in money to 6 poor persons.

Samuel Holmes, in 1753, left £10 for the benefit of the poor. In 1810, this money was paid by Joseph Brown to John Naylor, one of the overseers, for which he never accounted.

Elizabeth Burton, in 1757, left 6s. per annum, for a distribution of bread; the amount is charged on three cottages and gardens, the owner of which furnishes the bread every Sunday in Lent.


786                                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

Rev. Francis Gisborne’s charity.—(See Bradley.)—The annual sum of £5 10s., received by the incumbent, is laid out in flannel and given to the poor at Christmas.

 

Post Office at John Widdowson’s; letters arrive from Chesterfield at 8 a.m., and Ridgeway at 5 p.m., and are despatched to Chesterfield at 5 p.m.

 

Adlington Robt., surgeon and M.D.

Bargh Mr. George

Bower Mr. George

Bousfield Frederick, coal agent, Whittington

  Colliery

Cupit Mr. Augustus

Edge George, master, Endowed School

Firth Thos. & Sons, iron and steel manufrs.,

  Whittington Iron Works

Firth John, Esq., ironmaster

Fowler William, Esq., The Hall

Lupton Arthur, gent., Holly House

Naylor John, millwright and engineer

Ollivant Geo, and Wm., mole catchers

Robinson Rev. Robert, M.A., curate

Ryan John, schoolmaster

Shipley James, plumber and glazier

Steade Charles, Esq., Broom House

Swanwick Frederick, Esq.

Syddall Mr. John

Thompson James, farm bailiff

Thorpe Charles, blacksmith

Williams John E., manufacturing chemist

 

Inns and Taverns.

Bulls head, Hannah Cook

Cock and Magpie, and Revolution House,

  John Mettam

Miners Arms, Sidney Orwin

Sheep Bridge Inn, Henry Thornton

White Horse, Joseph Hartley

 

Beerhouses.

Hollingworth John,

  Malt Shovel

Longden Wm., Moor

 

Brick & Tile Mkrs.

Lee Abel

Mart Wm., Moor

 

Butchers.

Belfitt Charlotte

Brightmore Herbert

 

Coal Owners.

Harrison & Co., West

  Stavely Colliery;

  W. Blackburn, agt.

Pierce Fras. R. Whit-

  tington Colliery;

  Fdk. Bousfield, agt.

Corn Millers.

Cundey John

Thornton Hy., Sheep

  Bridge

Wheatcroft Joseph

 

Farmers.

Bower George

Bower John

Clark John

Collis John, Sheep

  Bridge

Cupit Benjamin

Gillet Thomas  

Hollingworth John

Jenkinson George

Jenkinson Samuel

Pierce Fras. R.

Robinson Joseph

Thorpe George

Turner William

Vickers Isaac

 

Joiners & Builders.

Fletcher William

Syddall Samuel

Widdowson John

 

Shoemakers.

Hancock George

Watkinson Samuel

 

Shopkeepers.

Cooke William  

Gladwin James

Green William

Hague William

Holland Sampson

Mettam Eliz.

Mettam Thos.

Thorpe George

Webster James

 

Stone Masons.

Gladwin James

Mettam Thomas

Mettam Thomas

Vickers Samuel

Ward Samuel

Woodhouse George

Tailors.

Beswick George

Chapman Henry

Pardy Frederick

Staton John

 

Wheelwrights.

Fletcher William

Syddall Samuel

Widdowson John

   

WHITWELL is an extensive parish and large agricultural village, on the Chesterfield and Worksop road, 11¾ miles E.N.E. from the former and 4½ miles W. by S. from the latter. The village, which is irregularly built, is picturesquely situated on declivities to the west and south, the houses are principally stone and roofed with slate. This parish forms the north-east extremity of the county, where, by an angular point, it stretches to the Shire oak, formerly celebrated for overshadowing into the counties of Derby, Nottingham, and York; on the site of the ancient tree a flourishing young oak is now growing, in Shireoaks, parish of Worksop. It is a deeply undulating district, principally on limestone, the eastern verge mostly sand, altogether good corn land in a high state of cultivation, and contains 5079A. 1R. 28P. of land, including 400A. of woods, besides various other plan­tations, &c. In 1851 here were 280 houses and 1355 inhabitants, of whom 700 were males, and 655 females; rateable value £3327 17s. 7d. The Duke of Portland is lord of the manor and principal owner. The Duke of Newcastle, Henry Bowdon, Esq., with several others are also owners. The Church, situated on an eminence at the west end of the village, is dedicated to Saint Lawrence; it is a commodious structure in the form of a cross, and has nave, chancel, transcepts, and large porches, with a square tower, in which are three


WHITWELL PARISH.                                                        787

 

bells. The interior is neatly fitted up and contains several monuments of great antiquity. In the chancel is a gravestone to the memory of Radulph Rye, Esq., of magnesian limestone, with an inscription round the margin, inlaid with pitch, which has penetrated the stone so much as to form one solid body. The living is a rectory, valued in the King’s book at £12 3s. 4d., now £625, in the patronage of the Duke of Portland, and incumbency of the Rev. Evelyn Boothby, B.A., who resides at the Rectory, a good residence on an eleva­tion opposite the church. The Wesleyan Association Methodists have a neat brick chapel here with a gallery at the east end, erected in 1846, at a cost of £273, including land, &c. it has seats for about 200 of which 150 are free. Adjoining the church is a school for boys and girls, with a house for the master and mistress, which is chiefly supported by the Duke of Portland and Lady Bentinck. The commons were enclosed under an act passed in 1813. Tithes have been commuted for £642 per annum. Framework knitting was carried on here formerly to a great extent, but is now altogether discontinued. A hiring for servants was also held on the 1st of November, which has long been obselete. The Feast is held nearest Sunday to St. Lawrence.

Baxton Moor situate on a bold elevation, half a mile S. is a small scattered hamlet, Belph, another small hamlet extending from 1 to 1½ miles S.E. The manor of Whitwell was given by Wulfrie Spott, in the reign of King Ethelred, to Burton Abbey. At Domes­day survey it belonged to Ralph Fitz-Hubert. Ralph de Rye was lord of the manor in 1330, and stated in answer to a quo warranto, that his ancestors had a park at Whitwell from time immemorial. Edward Rye, Esq. sold Whitwell, in the year 1563, to Richard Whalley, whose grandson of the same name, conveyed it, in 1592, to John Manners, Esq. (afterwards Sir John Manners) ancestor of the Duke of Rutland. In 1813, a treaty was commenced for the exchange of this manor for that of Barlow. Robert de Meynell, Lord of Whitwell, was one of the early benefactors to Welbeck abbey. The heiress of Meynell married Hathersage, and the co-heiress of Hathersage, Goushill, and Longford, who held it in moieties, and it passed to the Pipes or Pypes, and was sold by Humphrey Pipe, Esq., in 1593, to John Manners, abovementioned, and exchanged with the Duke of Portland. The old manor house, now the old hall, was the seat of Sir Roger Manners, in the reign of Charles I.

STEETLEY, or STETLEY, 2½ miles N.E., at the extremity of the county, adjoining to Not­tinghamshsre, was formerly a place of some note, though now only a farm house, yet it appears anciently to have been a parish and a rectory. The Vavasour family, and the Frechevilles, who succeeded them in the manor, presented to the rectory, in 1348, 1355, and 1370. The manor was conveyed by the Frecheville family to that of Wentworth, in or about the year 1571. It afterwards became parcel of the Worksop estate, and belonged to the Duke of Norfolk, but was sold to the Duke of Newcastle in 1842. The church, near the present farm house, exhibits a very complete specimen of the later and more enriched style of Saxon architecture, on a small scale, it has a nave and chancel, each 26 feet in length, the east end being circular and vaulted. The ribs of the arches, and the capitals of the half pillars from which they spring, are much enriched with mouldings, grotesque heads, foliage, and other ornaments. A cornice runs round the upper part of the building, on the outside. The arch of the south doorway is ornamented with zig-zag mouldings and heads; the shafts of the pillars are covered with sculptured foliage and other ornaments, in the style of the south doorway of Ely cathedral. It is covered with ivy and has long been desecrated. In 1828 several bodies were discovered in the burial ground. There are many scattered farms extending from 1 to 2 miles from the village. The hamlet of Cresswell is given with Elmton.

CHARITIES.—Mrs. Drewe, who died 1708, gave £5 to the use of the poor.

Peter Fox, who died 1732, gave by will, £3 to the poor. The amount, £8, is in the hands of George Porter, of Whitwell, at 4 per cent. interest.

Edward England, gave 5s. yearly to the poor, which is paid out of a homestead and some land in Whitwell.
788                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

Thomas Pilkington, who died 1756, gave the interest of £7 to the poor. The yearly sum of 18s. derived from the above benefactions is distributed at the church, on St. Thomas’s day amongst poor widows.

Joseph Bright, gave £5 to the poor, but this sum was lost by the insolvency of the person in whose hands it was placed at interest.

Rev. Francis Gisborne’s charity.—See Bradley.—The annual sum of £5 10s. received by the incumbent, is laid out in coarse woollen cloth and flannel, and given to the poor.

Post Office, at Joseph Swift’s; letters arrive by mail (gig) from Chesterfield at 9 a.m. and are despatched at 4.30 p.m.

 

Alletson Fredk., gamekeeper

Baker Wm., saddler and harness mkr.

Billam Mrs. Sarah

Boaler Caroline, ladies’ boarding school

Boothby Rev. Evelyn, B.A., Rectory

Chaloner Mr. Thomas

Flower Edward, spirit mcht.

Hardcastle Thos. & Mary, Free School

Hind John, corn miller, Belph

Legat George, farm bailiff

Parkin Mr. John, Belph moor

Parkin Mary, straw bnt. mkr., Belph moor

Reynolds Robt., cook at Welbeck, Millwood

  cottage, Belph

Rodgers Mrs. Ann, Baxton moor

Rodgers John, bricklayer, builder, & quarry

  owner, Baxton moor

Rotherham Miss Ann, Rose Cottage

Sponge John, painter & glazier at Welbeck

Unwin Geo., land agt., Southfield Cottage

Westby Geo., wheelwright at Welbeck

 

Inns and Taverns.

Boot and Shoe, Joseph Webster

Butchers’ Arms, Peter Legat

Dale Inn, Thomas Ellis

Half Moon, Geo. Shipman, Red hill

Jug and Glass, Wm. Tinker

Old George Inn, Charles Alletson

Portland Arms, Geo. Heartley, Belph

 

Beerhouses.

Godley George

Godley Wm.

Norman Daniel, Bax-

  ton moor

Platts Ann

 

Blacksmiths.

Arthur Edward

Gumby John

Heartley Geo., Belph

Holden John

Legat Peter

Legat Wm.

Pashley Jph.

 

Butchers.

Alletson George

Beeley Jonth.

Thompson Henry

Thompson John

Whitaker John

Wilson Matthew

 

 

Farmers.

Alletson Charles

Alletson Jph.

Battersby John,

  Springfields

Bowler Eliz., Belph

Broadhead William,

  Belph

Brunt Hanh.

Chaloner Charles,

  Steetley

Cross Robert

Eccles Reuben, Birks

Ellis John, White-

  brick moor

Ellis Joseph

Ellis Thomas

Gee Samuel

Glossop George

Glossop Peter, Com-

  mon

Hancock Charles,

  Hall Leys

Hancock George,

  Belph Grange

Hancock William

Hill Elizabeth

Hydes Wm., Walls

  House

Jackson John,

  Firbeck

Jepson John

Legat William

Lunn Elizabeth

Milner John, Walls

Priestley Joseph

Rodgers John, Bax-

  ton moor

Sheard John

Shipman George,    

  Red hill

Slaney Joseph

Smith Thos. Wm.,  

  Burnt Leys

Swift Joseph

Tompkin John,

  Highwood

Tompkin Thomas,

  Common

Wardley Stephen

Warriner John

Webster Geo., Butt

  Hills

Webster Joseph

Webster Robert,

  Baxton moor

Wilson John, Dumb

  Hall

Wilson Matthew, (&

  maltster)

Yates Robert

 

Grocers, &c.

Brunt Eliz., (and

  draper)

Butcher Elizabeth

Clarkson Wm.

Lowde Wm.

Stubbings Joseph

Swift Joseph

Turner Thomas, Bax-

  ton moor

 

Shoemakers.

Barlow Robt.

Brunt Jarvis

Brunt Joseph

Brunt Thomas

Guirdham Joseph

Hind Peter

Norman Daniel,

  Baxton moor

Stubbings James

Yates Robt.

Stone Masons.

Godley George

Godley John

Parkin John

Rodgers John, (and

  builder), Baxton

  moor

 

Straw Hat Mkrs.

Hill Mary

Parkin Mary, Belph

  moor

 

Surgeons.

Foulds Astley Cooper

Henderson Joseph,

  Millwood cottage,

  Belph

Royston John

 

Tailors.

Brown John, Bax-

  ton moor

Godley Samuel

Godley Wm.

Legat Wm.

 

Wheelwrights &

Joiners.

Alletson John

Ellis Joseph

Ellis Thomas

Ellis Thomas

Forrester Samuel

Hill Wm.

Shepherd John

Tinker Wm.


WINGERWORTH PARISH.                                               789

 

WINGERWORTH parish, formerly considered a chapelry in Chesterfield parish, con­sists of the Hall, and several small hamlets, and contains 2,907A. 2R. 13P. of land, mostly a clay soil, abounding in coal, of which 1,460A. are meadow and pasture, 700A. woods, 666A. arable, and 8lA. 2R. 13P, roads, water, and waste, and in 1851 had 95 houses, and 463 inhabitants, of whom 244 were males, and 219 females; rateable value £4310 3s. 1d. The late Sir Henry John Joseph Hunloke, Bart., was the principal owner and lord of the manor. The Family seat is Wingerworth Hall, a large elegant stone mansion in a well wooded park, 2¼ miles S.S.W. from Chesterfield; it was rebuilt between the years 1726 and 1729, by Sir Thomas Windsor Hunloke, the third baronet. The principal front is to the east, having the entrance from a broad flight of steps; the top is surrounded by balus­trades, ornamented with globes and urns. It is now occupied by Wilmer Wilmer, Esq. The Church, dedicated to All Saints, situated near the Hall, is a very ancient structure, with an embattled tower and three bells, which having become considerably dilapidated, has been restored, new paved, pewed, and provided with 2 good stoves for warming it. It contains some relics of stained glass, and several monuments to the Hunloke family, amongst which are two to the memories of respectively, Sir Henry John Joseph Hunloke, Bart., who died unmarried on the 8th February, 1856, and to Sir James Hunloke, Bart., who died 22nd June, 1856. The living is a perpetual curacy, certified value in the King’s book £16, now £74, has been augmented with £200 benefactions, and £400 Queen Anne’s bounty. The Bishop of Lichfield is patron, and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners are impropriators, and have 30A. 1R. 21P. of glebe, and the incumbent 15A. 1R. 23P. of glebe. The tithes are commuted for £248 10s. for the large, and £34 10s. for the small. The Rev. Samuel Revel, M.A., is the incumbent. The manor was in the family of Brailsford as early as the reign of Henry II. At a later period it belonged to the Curzons, of whom it was purchased, in the reign of Henry VIII., by Nicholas Hunloke. His grandson, Henry Hunloke, Esq., being at a very advanced age, died suddenly at Ilkeston, in this county, in the presence of King James I., to whom, as sheriff of the county, he went to pay his respects, and attended him thus far on his progress, in the year 1624. His son Henry, who is said to have been only four years of age at the time of his father’s death, distinguished himself as a zealous royalist, raised a troop of horse at his own ex­pense for Colonel Frecheville’s regiment, of which he was lieutenant-colonel, and distinguished himself at the battle of Edge Hill, in 1642, where he was knighted on the field, and in the same year created a baronet. Sir Thomas Windsor Hunloke, the fifth baronet, died in 1816, and was succeeded by his son, the late Sir Henry John Joseph, born in 1812, and who died in February, 1856. On his death the title reverted to his uncle, the late Sir James Hunloke, who, however, only enjoyed it for a few months, dying in June, 1856, when the baronetey and male issue became extinct. However, under the will of the last Sir Henry, the name and arms of Hunloke only, are to be borne by each successive owner (among his collateral relations), or to whom he may entail the estate; at present, and until certain events arrive among his immediate next heirs, he has put the management of his entire property into the hands of trustees, who are the Duke of Devonshire, and Wilmer Wilmer, Esq., of London, and they are in possession of the mansion and domain and the rest of the property. In this parish are extensive iron mines, and a foundry, held under the Hunloke estate, by Messrs. Yates, and Co., of Rotherham; also large collieries, worked by the Wingerworth Coal Company, and by the Clay Cross Company, so that there is a great demand for labour, and an extensive and valuable mineral field in full operation.

Wingerworth Hall was taken possession of for the Parliament, and garrisoned in the year 1643. It is said that the estate, though sequestered, was preserved from injury by Colonel Michel, a Parliamentary officer, who married the widow of the loyal Sir Henry Hunloke, who died in 1648.

Among Dr. Pegge’s notes, mention is made that Ann Ash died at Wingcrworth, in 1789, aged 104, and her tombstone records the fact. Feast, last Sunday in October. Here are


790                                                                          SCARSDALE HUNDRED.

 

some extensive stone and slate quarries, and various scattered farms. Birdholme Cottage, 1¼ mile N.E. Bole Hill, 1 mile S.W.

Derby Lane, a scattered district of houses, on the Chesterfield and Derby road. Harper Hill, 1¾ miles W.N.W. Hill Houses, a small hamlet, ¾ mile W.S.W. from the church. Lidgate, ½ mile W. Stonedge, 2¾ miles S.W., adjoins the Moors; here several basins and two seats are excavated in Stonedge Cliff.

Stubbing Court, a handsome mansion, 1 mile W., in a secluded situation, with park-like grounds, is the seat of Thomas Humphrey Pedley, Esq., and the property of Mrs. Gladwin.

Swathwick, a small village on the Walton and Chesterfield road, 1½ miles N.N.W. from the church.

CHARITIES.—John Stanford, who died in 1736, made in his lifetime some charitable provision, supposed to be verbal, as no record remains; but it appears from a paper, in the hand-writing of Sir Henry Hunloke, who died in 1804, that, as trustee of charity money under the name of that gentleman, he was possessed of £800 stock, New South Sea annuities. Since that period, £27 annually has been paid by the Hunloke family. Of the £27 received, £19 is paid to a schoolmaster at Hill Houses, where a school was built by Sir Henry Hunloke, about 1758. There is also a dwelling-house and garden, which the master occupies rent-free, in consequence of which 20 poor children are instructed. In 1856, W. Wilmer, Esq., one of the trustees under the will of the late Sir Henry Hunloke, gave the master notice to strike off the books, on the 1st of December, the 20 free scholars, and to charge them in future a trifle per week, according to what they require. Out of the residue the school premises are repaired, and the surplus is distributed amongst the poor.

Ellen Lowe, in 1669, left £20 to be laid out in land, the rent to be distributed yearly amongst poor widows. The sum of 20s. was secured on a field called the White Banks, in Hasland, and is distributed on Shrove Tuesday.

Godfrey Foljambe’s charity (see Chesterfield).—One-twelfth share was originally apportioned to this pariah, which, in 1827, amounted to £26 19s. 10d., for distribution to the poor; but we have recommended, as a more certain scale, that the division should be made according to the population of 1821, of which this parish will receive £4 17s., taking the income at £220.

Rev. Francis Gisborne’s charity (see Bradley). The annual sum of £5 10s., received by the incumbent, is laid out in coarse woollen cloth and flannel, which is dis­tributed to the poor.

Post Office at Mr. William Ivory Fletcher’s; letters arrive from Chesterfield at 8 a.m., and are despatched at 5 p.m.

 

Davis Joseph, horse breaker

Gascoygne Thomas, shoemaker, Swathwick

Gratton Joseph, cooper, Bole Hill

Mellor John, timber merchant

Oates George, farm steward

Parke John, shopkeeper

Pedley Thos. Humphrey, Esq., Stubbing

  Court

Revel Rev. Saml., incumbent., Harper Hill

Rutherford Jesse, stone merchant, Bole Hill

Rutherford Mr. William; Bole Hill

Wharton Aaron, gamekeeper

Wilmer Wilmer, Esq., The Hall

Wright Wm., wheelwright, Nether Moor

 

Inns and Taverns.

Barley Mow, Elizabeth Revell

Hunloke Arms, William Marshall

 

Farmers.

Bower G. Gorsey Place

Collis Wm., Stone Edge

Goodlad Wm., Swathwick

Greaves John (and

  blacksmith) Hill

  House

Hopkinson Thomas

  Swathwick

Leason Saml. & Henry

Madin Thos. (& stone

  mason). Hockley

Marshall William

Nuttall William

Parke Joseph, Hill

  Houses

Pearce Joseph

Pike Walter, Bird-

  holme

Robinson Geo. (and

  miller)

Rutherford Jesse, Bole

  Hill

Simpson Ellen, Slate

  Pit Dale

Turner Edw., Harper

  Hill

Turner Wm.. Swath­-

  wick

Watson Thos., Swath­-

  wick

Watts Brell, Swath­-

  wick

Wilson Thos., Birkin

  Lane

Young Wm., Harper

  Hill

 

 

 

 

SUTTON HALL [Sutton Hall at Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England][11]

 

The original Hall which formed part of a Saxon estate was left to the monks of Burton in the will of Wulfric Spott in the year 1002 and the Lordship of Sutton in the Dale was given to the family of Peter de Hareson by Henry III in 1255.

By far the most famous of the Sutton families in its thousand year history were the LEKES (LEAKES), who with ten generations owned the hall and its estates for three hundred and thirty three years. The family were always loyal to the crown, but this allegiance was at times costly, both in terms of money and in human life.

SIR FRANCIS LEKE was one of these men, he was Earl Scarsdale at the time of the English Civil War and was one of the loyal supporters of King Charles. He lost two sons in the war and as a result of his support for the king he was fined £18,000 to restore his estates after they were sequestrated by Oliver Cromwell this was paid by his friends. The family’s royalist support did have its rewards, JOHN LEKE was Knighted by Henry VIII at Lille. SIR FRANCIS LEKE was created Baronet by James I in 1611, made Lord Deincourt in 1624 and Earl Scarsdale just prior to the Civil War.

As Lord Deincourt was a Royalist during the Cival [sic] War the original hall was then fortified to defend against attack from the Cromwellian army. A force of some 500 men and three guns under the command of Colonel Thomas Gell besieged Sutton Hall but Lord Deincourt refused to surrender. The house was eventually taken by storm, the defences removed and Lord Deincourt taken prisoner. He was summoned to appear before parliament at Derby, this he refused to do and he joined the Kings forces at Newark instead.

After the execution of Charles I in 1649 Lord Deincourt was very disillusioned and had his grave dug and after clothing himself in sackcloth each Friday evening would lie in the grave to pray and meditate.

The brother of JOHN LEKE, THOMAS, had a daughter ELIZABETH who married JOHN HARDWICK and was the mother of 'Bess of Hardwick' the prolific builder of other local stately homes.

The present hall which overlooks the picturesque Scarsdale Valley to the north and east was built on the site of the existing hall and used much of the materials and structure of the old hall by the fourth and last Earl Scarsdale, NICHOLAS LEKE in 1720, with the assistance of the architect Francis Smith of Warwick. The earl died whilst heavily in debt due to the lavish rebuilding of the hall he had undertaken. The hall and all its estates were purchased by Godfrey Clarke of Somersall whose son Godfrey was lord of the manor until 1786.

The hall was twice owned by men who adopted their wives names to continue the family line of ownership of the house, its estates and titles. Edward Hilary took his wifes name of Grey and Job Hart Price took his wifes name Clarke.

In 1820 after Anne Price and Walter Butler died without any heirs the hall was sold to the son of the entrepreneur and inventor of the spinning frame Sir Richard Arkwright, Richard Arkwright who lived at Willersly Castle. There were now four branches of the Arkwright family. Sutton, Willersly Castle, Hampton Court in County Hereford and Knutston Hall in County Northampton, the squires of Sutton being the senior branch,

The Arkwrights owned the hall and estates and suffered mixed fortunes until 1919 when the hall, lands and buildings were sold at auction by William Arkwright. It is said that William suffered a horrendous fall from a horse in his younger days and was a cripple thereafter. He sold the estates to move to the warmer climes of southern England on the proceeds. The 'Hall and Grounds', lot number 37 was withdrawn from the auction at £12,600, the bidding having started at £8,000.

The hall was not sold until the 1920's when the building firm of Haslam Ltd. Purchased the hall to demolish it and use for building materials. The Adams fireplaces which were inlaid with Blue John were stripped from the house and sent to America to a Philadelphia museum along with the ornate staircases, where they still are today. The roof was stripped of lead, the ornate ceilings which were designed by some of the finest Italian craftsmen were removed to take out the wooden joists and some of the stone was used to build houses in the Somersall and Brampton area, leaving only the shell of this once proud Georgian building.

In 1946 the building had deteriorated to such an extent that it was planned to demolish it, three days before the demolition machinery were due to move in on the hall the shell was saved for eternity by the purchase of the hall by Sir Osbert Sitwell who was persuaded to act by a local resident Harold Taylor. The hall was later given over to the Department of the environment in the late 1960's. In 1971 emergency repairs were started to secure the building from further decay.

The cost of this work was estimated at around £30,000, the money was secured for the work to begin. (£5,000 was forthcoming from the Derbyshire County Council) and later during 1992 the building was finally secured and the plaster mouldings left after the removal of the ceilings and fireplaces were sealed and preserved and secure ornate iron bars were placed in all the window mullions and it is now possible to walk inside the shell of a building 'which is the finest of its type and era in the Midlands'.[12]

 

The Church of Saint Marys. 

The church of St. Marys is built on to the side of the hall and it consists of a chansel, nave, north aisle, south porch and a western tower. It appears to have been rebuilt between the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

There are several memorials within the church, a marble tablet in the chancel as a memorial to Francis Pierrepont the grandson of Robert the Earl of Kingston who died in 1707. There are two post reformation monuments bearing crosses and dedicated to the memory of the Redfearnes of Duckmanton. The monuments and stained glass windows dedicated to the LEEKES and earlier owners are no longer there. With the exception of one inscribed stain glass window which reads, Leake-Beresford-Hassal. In 1710 it was reported that every window in the church was decorated with this inscription.[13]

 

 

 

 

The ceilings of the north aisle of Sutton Hall [Sutton Hall at Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England] once housed five coates of arms.[14]

Leake Impaling Savage.

Leake Impaling Foljambe.

Foljambe impaling Leake.

Waterton Impaling Leake.

 

 

Timeline of Sutton Hall at Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England.[15]

1086 Roger Poicton, apparently reverted to the crown.

1255 Peter de Hareston, by grant of Henry III.

Robert de Hareston.

1297 Richard de Grey of Sandiacre, by marriage with Lucia the heiress daughter of Robert, whose sister was mother to Richard.

William de Grey.

1316 John de Grey.

William de Grey.

1390 Edward Hilary, by marriage with Alice the daughter and heiress of William, who took the name Grey.

John de Grey.

1401-2 JOHN LEKE of Gotham Nottinghamshire, England.

1457 WILLIAM LEKE married CATHRINE CHAWORTH.

JOHN LEKE married ELIZABETH SAVAGE. (John’s brother THOMAS had a daughter ELIZABETH, who married JOHN HARDWICK and was mother to 'BESS OF HARDWICK').

SIR JOHN LEKE married JANE FOLJAMBE.

1569 SIR FRANCIS LEKE married ELIZABETH PASTON.

FRANCIS LEKE married FRANCES SWIFT.

SIR FRANCIS LEKE married ANNE CAREY and was created Baron Deincourt and Earl Scarsdale.

NICHOLAS LEKE, Earl Scarsdale married FRANCES RICH.

ROBERT LEKE the third Earl Scarsdale married MARY LEWYS, who was succeeded by his nephew.

NICHOLAS LEKE the fourth and last Earl Scarsdale died in 1735 without issue.

1735 Purchased by Godfrey Clarke of Somersall.

Godfrey Clarke.

1786 Job Hart Price by marriage with the sister of Godfrey Walter Butler, Marquis of Ormond by marriage with the daughter and heiress of Price.

1824 Richard Arkwright J.P. D.L. of Willersly Castle, by purchase. Married Mary Simpson of Bonsall.

1848 Robert Arkwright J.P. D.L. of Sutton Hall. Married Frances Crawford Kemble of Durham.

1859 William Arkwright of Sutton Hall. Married Agnes Mary Cocks the neice of Lord Somers.

 

Pedigree of FOLJAMBE, of Aldwarke Hall.[16] Source: Joseph Foster, Pedigrees of the county families of Yorkshire, vol. 1 (London, 1874).[17] SIR EDWARD FOLJAMBE, Knight, was at Agincourt, and was knighted 3 Hen. 6, ob. 26 Hen. 6, aged 57, buried at Tideswell,[18],[19] Derbyshire,[20] England. He married CECILIA LEEKE, daughter of SIR PHILIP LEEKE, Knight, of Sutton-en-le-Dale [Sutton in the Dale], co. Derbyshire, England. She married, 2ndly, JOHN WOODBURNE, ESQ. [21]

 

1401-2 JOHN LEKE of Gotham.[22]

1457 WILLIAM LEKE married CATHRINE CHAWORTH.[23]

JOHN LEKE married ELIZABETH SAVAGE. John’s brother THOMAS had a daughter ELIZABETH, who married JOHN HARDWICK and was mother to 'BESS OF HARDWICK'.[24]

SIR JOHN LEKE married JANE FOLJAMBE. [25]

1569 SIR FRANCIS LEKE married ELIZABETH PASTON. [26]

FRANCIS LEKE married FRANCES SWIFT. [27]

SIR FRANCIS LEKE married ANNE CAREY and was created Baron Deincourt and Earl Scarsdale.[28]

NICHOLAS LEKE, Earl Scarsdale married FRANCES RICH. [29]

ROBERT LEKE the third Earl Scarsdale married MARY LEWYS, who was succeeded by his nephew.[30]

NICHOLAS LEKE the fourth and last Earl Scarsdale died in 1735 without issue.[31]

 

SIR GODFREY FOLJAMBE, of Walton, Knight, born at Walton on Easter-day, 27 March, 1472, esquire of the body to King Henry 7 & 8. Was granted a tiger arg. ducally gorged or, and an antelope quarterly or and sa. as supporters, and two additional crests; viz. 1. A chapeau gu. turned up ermine, a tiger statant arg. ducally gorged or, and 2. On a wreath a chat-loup or calopus quarterly, or and sa., to be borne by him and his posterity. He was thrice sheriff of co Derby, 11, 16 & 28 Hen. 8, married 1490, and died 20 Dec., 1541, buried in the family vault at Chesterfield with his ancestors 22 December. He married KATHERINE LEEKE, daughter of SIR JOHN LEEKE,[32] Knight, of Sutton-en-le-Dale [Sutton in the Dale], co. Derbyshire,[33] England. She died 24 May, 1529, buried at Chesterfield, England.

BENNET (or JENNET) FOLJAMBE, married to SIR JOHN LEEKE, Knight, of Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England.[34]

SIMON DE LEEK. Nottingham. Date: 1404-1424. Volume 1. Page 14, 24. Bundle 4, 5. British Chancery Records, 1386-1558.[35]

 

1790/1800 COUNTY TAXLISTS OF VIRGINIA[36]

NAME                                           COUNTY              TAX LIST                      PAGE

LEAK, JOHN W.                         Goochland            1802 Personal B               07

LEAK, JOSEPH                            Henry                    1800 Personal                  08

LEAKE, JOSIAH                          Goochland            1802 Personal B               07

LEAK, PETER                              Henry                    1800 Personal                  08

LEAK, THOMAS                        Henry                    1800 Personal                  09

LEAK, WALTER                         Goochland            1802 Personal B               07

LEAKE, AUSTIN                        Hanover                1799 Personal B               12

LEAKE, ELISHA, CAP               Goochland            1801 Personal A              05

LEAKE, JOHN                             Norfolk                  1799 Personal B               19

LEAKE, SARAH                          Norfolk                  1799 Personal B               19

 

SIMON LEEK. History of the County of Nottingham, Including the Borough, Volume. 1. Chapter; Annals of Nottinghamshire. Page 290.[37]

 

ISABEL LEEK was born in 1371 in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. She married GODFREY FOLJAMBE. Godfrey was born in 1367, in Hassop, Derbyshire, England.

 

1402. 4, Hen. IV. On the 21st of July [1402], was fought the sanguinary battle of Shrewsbury, in which Sir John Clifton, Sir Nicholas Burden, of Maplebeck, Sir Hugh Shirley, of Radcliffe-on-Soar, and several other Nottinghamshire gentlemen, where slain.

            This Sir John Clifton brought a great accession of property to his family by his marriage with Katharine, the daughter of Sir John Cressi, by whom he obtained Hodsack, in this count, estates in Lincolnshire, and Belton, in Yorkshire. Sir John was one of twelve gentlemen who received the spurs of knight-hood only on the morning of that destructive fight, and ten of whom fell in the murderous conflict of the day.

            “We shall scarcely find,” says the historian, “any battle in those ages, where the shock was more terrible and more constant than in this. The armies were nearly equal in numbers, each comprising about 12,000 men. The commanders, too, on both sides, were amongst the men of the age most famous for valour and skill in the art of war. Percy and Douglas, from the nor, then, for almost the first time, united in one common cause: Glendour, from the west, and a large array of nobles and gentry from various parts of England, led on the bands of insurgents, as they were termed by their opponents. On the royal side was the new king himself, his gallant son Henry, then but a youth, the Earl of Stafford, Sir Hugh Shirley, Sir John Massey, Sir Hugh Mortimer, and many others, of the very flower of the honour and chivalry of England.”

            “Percy,” continues Hume, “maintained on that day the fame which he had acquired in many a bloody combat; and Douglas, his ancient enemy, and now his friend and associate, still appeared his rival amidst the horrors and confusion of the field. This nobleman performed feats of valour which are almost incredible. He seemed determined that the king of England should that day fall by his arm; he therefore sought him with avidity all over the field of battle. But, while the armies were contending in this furious manner, the death of Percy, by an unknown hand, decided the victory, and the Royalists prevailed.”

            There are said to have fallen, in that sanguinary conflict, on both sides, not less than two thousand three hundred gentlemen and men of rank; but the greatest number of persons of distinction, who perished, were on the side of the king. About six thousand men of inferior drank likewise were slain on that fatal day. The Earls of Worcester and Douglas were among the few prisoners taken; the former was beheaded at Shrewsbury, the latter was treated with the courtesy due to his rank and merit.

            1403. 5, Hen. IV. Robert Glade, mayor; Walter Stacey and Roger de Tapton, bailiffs. No record of members for the borough. Richard Stanhope and SIMON LEEK, knights of the shire.

Appendix. Page vii. CHARLES LEEK was one of the signers of a petition of grievances and desires for reformation.

 

Leek Lady’s Charity, page 1042.

 

Page 883. Major General Whalley. They Whalleys were a very ancient family among the landed gentry of this town: but the first we hear of them, in connection with Nottinghamshire, is in a marriage deed, whereby THOMAS LEEK, ESQ., of Kirton, in the hundred of Bassetlaw, and JANE his wife. (18 Edward IV.) covenanted to marry their daughter and heir, to Richard Whalley, of Darlaston, in the county of Stafford. They held t this time, likewise, lands in Lancashire. This Richard Whalley had a son Thomas, who married Elizabeth, the daughter of John Strelley, of Woodborough. By succeeding marriages, and the grant of church lands, the Whalleys became very extensive proprietors in this county, but were afterwards much reduced in circumstances. Their principal residence was at Screveton, near Newark, as has been before observed. Richard Whalley, the father of the major-general, had three wives, but issue only by the second, Frances, the daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell, Knt, of Hinchinbrook, and aunt of Oliver Cromwell, Protector. This issue consisted of three sons—Thomas, who died during the life-time of his father; Edward, the major-general; and Henry, who was judge-advocate during the period of the Commonwealth.

 

Page 906. 1663. 15, Charles II. William Greaves, mayor of Nottingham; Christopher Hall and Gervas Rippon, sheriffs. Freeman enrolled, thirty-two. Richard Herring, mayor of Newark.

                By deed, bearing date the 14th of March, this year, John Martin gave the interest of £50, to be paid to the mayor and aldermen of Newark, to be by them laid out n coals at Christmas, every year.

                John Kemp, by his will bearing date 26th August, gave his house, and all his land in North Muskham, to his mother, Frances Kemp, during her life, and after her decease, to the proper use and benefit of the poor of the town of North Muskham; and he ordained that the minister, churchwardens, and overseers of the poor for the time being, should let his land, and distribute the yearly rent of it to the poor for ever. …

                The tower of the church at Bilsthorpe erected this year.

               

                On Sunday night, October 11th, Colonel Hutchinson, whose fate, as we have seen, had long hung in the balance, was arrested by a party of soldiers under an order form MR. FRANCIS LEKE, or LEEK, a deputy-lieutenant of the county, and conducted to Newark.[38]

                The following is Mrs. Hutchinson’s account of the transaction, and steps which led to it:

 

MORE… (Ancestry.com)

 

Page 1042. 1690. 2, Wm. & Mary.

                LADY FRANCIS LEEK, by her will, dated the 23rd of December, 1690, gave one hundred pounds to the use of the poor of the parish of Newark, and two hundred pounds to be laid out in communion plate for the service of the church there.”

1691. 3, Wm. & Mary.

 

SIR JOHN LEEK, Knight, was born in Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire, England.  The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. SIR JOHN LEEKE, LORD OF COTHAM.

 

SIR JOHN LEEK, Knight, was born in Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire, England. The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. SIR JOHN LEEK, LORD OF COTHAM.[39]

 

SIR JOHN LEEK, Knight, was born about 1319, in Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire, England. He married ISABEL TOWERS. She was born in about 1319, in England. The Visitation of the County of Nottingham In the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. SIR JOHN LEEK, LORD OF COTHAM.[40] SIR JOHN LEEK married ISABEL TOWERS. JOHN LEAKE died in 1449. [41]

 

SIMON LEEK was born in 1345, in Tideswell,[42] Derbyshire, England. He married unknown. He died unknown. He married JOAN TALBOT. Joan was born in about 1349, in Swannington, Leicestershire, England. The Visitation of the County of Nottingham In the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, Volume 4, page 14. Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.

I.         ANNE LEEK (2). The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall, 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. A nun.

II.        ELIZABETH LEEK. The Visitation of the County of Nottingham In the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. Elizabeth daughter & coheire.[43]

III.      MARGERETT LEEK married SIR JOHN MARKHAM (2). The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, pp. 14 and 24.[44]  SIR JOHN MARKHAM: The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 24. SIR JOHN MARKHAM of Sedbrook Lord Cheefe Justice of England & deposed by Edward IV.[45]

IV.      MARY LEEK . The Visitation of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, edited by G.W. Marshall 1871, Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 4, p. 14. MARY, daughter & coheire ux. [wife] Sir Gyles Daubney.[46]

 

WILLIAM OF LEAKE.[47]

 

JOHN OF LEAKE.[48] JOHN OF LEAKE[49]

 

SIMON LEEK of Leake, [Cotham, Sandiacre], Nottinghamshire, England. He married MARGARET VAUX, in England. She was born before 1351, in England.

1.         MARGARET LEEK was born before 1382, in Leake, [Cotham, Sandiacre], Nottinghamshire, England. Margaret was his second daughter.[50] She married THOMAS REMPSTON, K.G. before 1419, in [Nottinghamshire], England. He was born before 1378, in [Nottinghamshire], England.

2.         ELIZABETH LEEK was born in about 1379, in [Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire], England. He died in 1460, in England. She married HUGH HERCYE, ESQ. He was born in about 1379, in Grove, Nottinghamshire, England.

 

1.     SIR SIMON LEKE, Knighted,[51] was born about 1390/1410 in Cotham/Cothem, Nottinghamshire, England.[52] He married JANE TALBOT, in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire. They had a daughter, MARY LEKE. Jane was born about 1393, in Swanington, Leicestershire, England.[53] Jane was the daughter of JOHN TALBOT and ALICE MOTON. JOHN TALBOT was born about 1363 in Swanington, Leicestershire, England. John was the son of PHILLIP TALBOT and ELIZABETH FIENE. Phillip was born about 1330 in Swanington, Leicestershire, England. Phillip was the son of ALAN TALBOT. Alan was born about 1300, in Swanington, Leicestershire, England.[54] GILES DAUBENY [Sir Knight] was born about 1395 in of, Kempston, Bedfordshire, England and was christened 25 Oct 1395 in Kempston, Bedfordshire, England. He died 11 Jan 1446 in Barrington, Somersetshire, England and was buried in Our Lady Chapel, South Petherton, Somersetshire, England. Giles married Mary Leke before 18 May 1436 in Nottinghamshire, England.[55]

 

Children of SIR SIMON LEKE and JANE TALBOT:

 

A.    MARY LEEK was born about 1417, in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England. She died on 27 Mar 1455, in [South Petherton, Somersetshire], England. She was buried in South Petherton, Somersetshire, England. She married SIR GILES DAUBENY (Knight), before 18 May 1436, in Nottinghamshire, England. Their known child was JANE FRANCES DAUBENY who married ROBERT MARKHAM.[56],[57]

 

2.     JOHN LEAKE was born about 1386 in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England. He died in 1456. He married ALICIA GREY. John was the son of JOHN LEAKE and ISABEL TOWERS.[58] WILLIAM LEAKE died in 1458. William was the son of JOHN LEAKE and ALICIA GREY.[59] JOHN LEEKE/LEKE/LEAKE was the son of SR. JOHN LEEKE and ISABEL TOWERS.

 

JOHN LEAKE (LEKE)[60] was born in [Sutton Scarsdale or Sutton-in-the-Dale], Derbyshire, England. JOHN OF LEAKE.[61] JOHN LEAKE[62] was born in about 1395, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England.[63]

 

NICHOLAS OF LEAKE.[64] NICHOLAS LEAKE[65] [Had no children]

 

JOHN OF LEAKE.[66] JOHN LEAKE[67] was born in about 1382/1410 in Cotham, Nottingham, England. He married ALICE GREY in about 1430, in Cotham, Nottingham, England. Alice was born about 1384/1414 in Cotham, Nottingham, England. JOHN LEEK was born in about 1382/1410, in Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire, England. He married ALICE DE GREY, in [Cotham, Sandiacre, Nottinghamshire], England.[68] JOHN LEAKE died in 1456. He married ALICIA GREY. John was the son of JOHN LEAKE and ISABEL TOWERS.[69]

 

I.         JOHN LEAKE[70] JOHN OF LEAKE.[71] was born about 1424, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. JOHN LEAKE died on 12/11/1522. John was the son of JOHN LEAKE.[72] He married ELIZABETH SAVAGE, in about 1466, in [Clifton, Cheshire Derbyshire], England.[73] Elizabeth’s second marriage was to (2) SIR JOHN HAMPDEN, Knight, in about 1472, in Of Clifton, Cheshire, or Sutton, Derbyshire, England. Elizabeth was the daughter of SIR JOHN SAVAGE and ELIZABETH (ELEANOR) BRERETON,[74] or CATHERINE STANELY.[75] SIR JOHN SAVAGE was born in 1403, in Clifton, Cheshire, England. He married MAUD (MATILDA) DE SWINNERTON. SIR JOHN SAVAGE died 01 Aug 1450, in Clifton, Cheshire, England. SIR JOHN SAVAGE was the son of JOHN SAVAGE and MARGARET DANYERS. JOHN SAVAGE was born in about 1327, in Cheadle, Cheadle, Cheshire, England. He married, by Contract, MARGARET DANYERS in 1365, in Cheadle, Cheshire, England. JOHN SAVAGE was the son of ROBERT SAVAGE and ALICE AMICIA WALKINGTON. JOHN LEEKE married ALICE GREY.

 

A.    THOMAS LEEK (LEKE) (LEAKE) was born in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. Thomas was the son of JOHN LEEK (LEAKE)(LEKE) and ELIZABETH SAVAGE. [76]

 

II.        WILLIAM LEKE (LEEK) married CATHERINE/KATHERINE CHAWORTH. WILLIAM LEEK was born about 1416, in Sutton, Scarsale, Derbsyhire, England.[77] He married CATHERINE CHAWORTH. She was born about 1432, in Lakeford (Latchford?), Cheshire, England. He died in 1458, in [Sutton, Scarsale, Derbsyshire], England. William was the son of JOHN LEEK and ALICE DE GREY. [78] WILLIAM LEAKE died in 1458. William was the son of JOHN LEAKE and ALICIA GREY.[79]

 

Children of WILLIAM LEKE and CATHERINE/KATHERINE CHAWORTH:

 

A.    JOHN LEAKE (LEKE)[80] was born about 1440, in [Sutton], Southwell Dale, Derbyshire, England.[81],[82],[83],[84] He was born about 1360, in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.[85] He married ISABEL TOWERS.[86] She was born about 1442, in Somerby, Lincolnshire, England. Isabel was the daughter of JOHN TOWERS.[87],[88],[89] She was born about 1364, in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.[90] John died on 24 Mar 1504, in [Sutton, Derbyshire], England. JOHN LEEK was the son of WILLIAM LEEK/LEKE and CATHERINE/ KATHEREINE CHAWORTH. SIR JOHN LEKE, Knight, was born about 1360, in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.[91],[92],[93],[94],[95],[96],[97],[98] ISABEL TOWER was born about 1364 in Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.[99],[100],[101],[102],[103],[104],[105],[106] JOHN LEEKE[107] married ISABEL TOWERS. Isabel was born about 1344, in Somerby, Lincolnshire, England. Isabel was the daughter of JOHN TOWERS[108] and ISABEL STANSLEY (STANLEY?).[109] Isabel was the daughter of JOHN TOWERS and ISABEL STARELEY.[110],[111] JOHN TOWERS was born about 1320 in Somerby, Lincolnshire, England.[112],[113]  SIR JOHN LEAKE (Knighted) was born about 1450, in Southwell Dale, Derbyshire, England.[114] John was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and UNKNOWN.[115]

 

Children of JOHN LEEK and ISABEL TOWERS:

 

1.     THOMAS LEAKE was born about 1458, in Kirk Hallam, Derbyshire, England.[116] He married MARGARET FOX, in England. She was born about 1450, in Hasland, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.[117]

a.     ELIZABETH LEAKE was born in about 1498, in Ault Hucknull, Hardwick, Derbyshire, England.[118]

2.     JOHN LEAKE was born about 1450. John was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and UNKNOWN.[119]

 

I.         CATHERINE LEEKE (LEAKE) was born in about 1467, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. She died 24 May 1529, in [Sutton, Derbyshire], England. KATHARINE LEAKE was born about 1476, at Sutton-en-le-Dale, Derbyshire England. She died 24 May 1529, in [Sutton-en-le-Dale, Derbyshire, England]. She married SIR GODFREY FOLGAMSBE, Knight. Sir Godfrey was born on 27 Mar 1472, at Walton, Derbyshire, England. Sir Godfrey died on 20 Dec 1541, in [Walton, Derbyshire, England]. Sir Godfrey was the son of HENRY FOLGAMSBE and BENEDICTA VERNON.[120] Northern New York Genealogical and family history of northern New York: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. New York: Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1910.[121] SIR JOHN III DUNHAM, son of SIR JOHN II DUNHAM, was born in 1498. SIR JOHN III DUNHAM married BENEDICTA FOLGAMSBEE, daughter of ADAM FOLGAMSBEE and KATHRYN F. LEAKE. KATHRYN was daughter of JOHN LEAKE, Southwell Dale, Derbyshire, England. He died in 1545.[122]

a.     BENEDICTA GOLGAMSBE was born in 1499 in Southwell Dale, Derbyshire, England. Benedict was the son of GODFREY FOLGAMSBE and KATHARINE LEAKE.[123]

 

Children of JOHN LEEK (LEAKE) and JANA FOLJAMBE:

 

A.        JOHN LEEK (LEAKE) was born about 1503, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. John was the son of JOHN LEEK (LEAKE) and JANA FOLJAMBE. JOHN LEAKE died on 12/11/1522 (12 Nov 1522). John was the son of JOHN LEAKE.[124]

 

B.             SIR FRANCIS LEEK (LEAKE) was born in about 1496, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. He died 01 Aug 1580, in [Sutton, Derbyshire], England.

 

1.     MURIEL LEAKE was born in 1504, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. Muriel was the daughter of SIR FRANCIS LEAKE.

 

C.        ANN LEEK (LEAKE) was born in about 1503, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England.

 

JOHN LEEK (LEAKE) married ANN MAINWARING

  1. SUSAN LEEK was born about 1516, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England
  2. ELIZABETH LEE (LEAKE) was born about 1518/1520, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. Elizabeth was the daughter of JOHN LEEK (LEAKE) and ANN MAINWARING.
  3. DOROTHY LEEK (LEAKE) was born about 1520, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. Dorothy was the daughter of JOHN LEAKE and ANN MAINWARING.

 

THOMAS LEEK (LEAKE)

1.     ELIZABETH LEEK (LEAKE) was born in about 1528, in Williamthorp, Derbyshire, England. Elizabeth was the daughter of THOMAS LEEK (LEAKE).

 

JOHN LEEK (LEAKE)

I.     FRANCIS LEAKE was born in 1506, in [Sutton, Scarsdale, Derbyshire], England. He married ELIZABETH PASTON. Elizabeth was born in about 1508, in Paston, Norfolk, England. He was the son of JOHN LEAKE.[125],[126]

A.    FRANCIS LEEK (LEAKE) was born about 1540, in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. He died before 1628, in [Sutton, Derbyshire], England. Francis was the son of FRANCIS LEEK (LEAKE) and ELIZABETH PASTON.

 

I.         SIR FRANCIS LEAKE (LEKE)[127] was born in 1550, in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England. [Francis was the son of FRANCIS LEEK and ELIZABETH PASTON]. He married (1) MARY EGIOKE (MARY FRANCIS EGLOCK)[128] in about 1604, in [Derbyshire, England].[129] MARY EGLOCK was born in 1588 or earlier, in Of Clifton, Nottinghamshire, England. She died on 19 Jan 1630, in London, London, England. St. Giles Church, Derbyshire, England.[130] She was buried on 19 Jan 1630, at St. Giles’ Parish Church, West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England.[131],[132] [St. Files in the Fields, West End, London, London, England.[133] MARY EGLOCK was the daughter of JOHN EGLOCK and ANNE HUSBAND. MARY EGLOCK married BARONET GERVASE CLIFTON on 05 May 1629, in Of, Clifton, Nottinghamshire, England.[134] JOHN EGLOCK was born about 1574, in Of, Wigworn, England.[135] ANNE HUSBAND was born about 1578, in Of, Egioke, Worcestershire, England.[136] He married (2) FRANCES SWIFT[137] in about 1580/81, in Derbyshire, England. Francis was born about 1559, in Of, Bayton, Yorkshire, England. FRANCES SWIFT was the daughter of ROBERT SWIFT.[138] He died in 1611/1626, (before 1628) in Newark, England. Earl of Scarsdale. The manor of Dunston and Holme, now esteemed parcel of the Duke of Devonshire's manor of Newbold, was given by Matthew de Hathersage, to the orior and covent of Lenton in Nottinghamshire. King Henry VIII granted it to FRANCIS LEAKE, ESQ. SIR FRANCIS LEAKE, Baronet, was created by King James the first 26 October 1624 Lord Deincourt, and afterwards, Earl of Scarsdale, which title became extinct upon the death of Nicholas, fifth Earl of Scarsdale -- July 1736.[139] FRANCIS LEAKE was the son of JOHN LEAKE.[140] SIR FRANCIS LEAKE (LEKE) was born in 1549/1550, in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England. He married MARY EGIOKE (MARY FRANCIS EGLOCK) in about 1604, in [Derbyshire, England].[141] He married (2) FRANCES SWIFT in about 1580, in Derbyshire, England. He died in 1611/1626, in Newark, England. Earl of Scarsdale. The manor of Dunston and Holme, now esteemed parcel of the Duke of Devonshire's manor of Newbold, was given by Matthew de Hathersage, to the priory and covent of Lenton[142],[143] in Nottinghamshire.[144] King Henry VIII granted it to FRANCIS LEAKE, ESQ. SIR FRANCIS LEAKE baronet was created by King James the first 26 October 1624 Lord Deincourt, and afterwards, Earl of Scarsdale, which title became extinct upon the death of Nicholas, fifth earl of Scarsdale -- July 1736.[145] FRANCIS LEAKE was born in 1550 in Sutton, Derbyshire, England. He died in 1611, in [Sutton, Derbyshire], England. Francis, Sr. was the son of JOHN LEAKE (LEKE). [146]

 

Children of FRANCIS LEAKE and MARY EGIOKE:

 

A.        FRANCIS LEAKE (LEKE) was born about 1581, in Sutton, Scardsale, Derbyshire, England. He married ANNE CARY in 1601, in Sutton, Scardsale, Derbyshire, England. She was born on 10 Aug 1585, in Cockington, Devonshire, England.[147] FRANCIS LEKE, first Earl of Scarsdale, married ANNE CARY, dau. of SIR EDWARD CARY, of Aldenham[148] [Aldenham[149] was in the Dacorum parish[150]], and [Little] Berkhampstead[151] or Berkhamsted,[152] Herts [in Hertford Hundred[153]] or Hertfordshire, England. The Marriage, Baptism, and Burial Registers of the Collegiate Church or Abbey of St Peter, Westminster. “Burials in Westminster Abbey,” page 201. [LADY FRANCES LEKE, page 202. ROBERT LEKE, pages 209, 261. LADY CATHERINE LEKE, page 231. JOHN LEAKE, page 450. WILLIAM LEAKE, page 450.[154] The LADY FRANCES [LEKE], daughter to ROBERT [LEKE], Earl of Scarsdale, was buried in Westminster Abbey on 15 Mar 1680/81, in Westminster Abbey.

 

B.        CAPT. RICHARD LEAKE [155] was born in 1590/1600, in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England. He married UNKNOWN, in England. He died in 1660, in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England.[156],[157],[158] Richard was the son of FRANCIS LEAKE and MARY EGIOKE. Richard was the father of CAPTAIN RICHARD LEAKE who lived 1620-1696. CAPTAIN RICHARD LEAKE served in the British navy and was the father of SIR JOHN LEAKE, the noted English Admiral. SIR JOHN LEAKE, 1656‑1720, was knighted by Queen Anne on February 3, 1703, and was made Vice Admiral. He defended Gibraltar in 1705, defeating the French fleet, for which he was promoted to Admiral and later First Lord of the Admiralty. In 1708, he captured Minorca.[159] RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1590, probably Sutton, Derbyshire, England. He died in 1660. Richard was the son of FRANCIS LEAKESR.[160]

 

Children of RICHARD LEAKE and UNKNOWN:

 

1.     RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1629 in Harwich, Essex, England. He died Jul 1696, in Woolwich, Kent, England.[161] (?)

2.     SIR JOHN LEAKE (1656-1720), the noted English Admiral, was knighted by Queen Anne on February 3, 1703, and was made Vice Admiral. He defended Gibralter in 1705, defeating the French fleet, for which he was promoted to Admiral and later First Lord of the Admirality. In 1708, he captured Minorca.[162]

2.     WALTER LEAKE[163] was born in 1635, in England. He married UNKNOWN in about 1659, in Nottinghamshire, England. He died in 1700, in England.[164],[165] Walter was the son of RICHARD LEAKE and UNKNOWN.[166]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Berkhamsted, Hertford.

Rose & Sons, Stationers, Hertford, circa 1910.[167]

 

 

 

 

Aldenham Church, Herts[168]

Published by T A Hood, Stationer & Newsagent, Letchmore Heath, Watford 

Printed by The R.A.P.Co Ltd, London EC4

 

NICHOLAS LEKE, Earl of Scarsalde, was buried on 04 Feb 1680/81 in Westminster Abbey. He was the second but eldest surviving son of FRANCIS LEKE, first Earl of Scarsdale, by ANNE, dau. of SIR EDWARD CARY (CAREY), of Aldenham[169] [Aldenham[170] was in the Dacorum parish[171]], and [Little] Berkhampstead[172] or Berkhamsted,[173] Herts [in Hertford Hundred[174]] or Hertfordshire, Kt. [Knight], succeeded his father as second Earl in 1655. He died 27 Jan., and his son and successor, ROBERT, third Earl of Scarsdale, administered to his estate 10 Feb 1680-1. See his wife’s burial 21 Nov. 1692, his sister’s 29 Jan. 1692-3, and that of his grand-daughter 15 March 1680-1. The unofficial register says that he was buried in the Hunsdon vault. The Marriage, Baptism, and Burial Registers of the Collegiate Church or Abbey of St Peter, Westminster. “Burials in Westminster Abbey,” page 201. [LADY FRANCES LEKE, page 202. ROBERT LEKE, page 209, 261. LADY CATHERINE LEKE, page 231. JOHN LEAKE, page 450. WILLIAM LEAKE, page 450.[175] The LADY FRANCES [LEKE], daughter to ROBERT [LEKE], Earl of Scarsdale, was buried in Westminster Abbey on 15 Mar 1680/81, in Westminster Abbey.

 

In its heyday Sutton Hall at Sutton Scarsdale was one of Derbyshire’s, if not England’s finest classical country houses, rivalling Chatsworth in size and splendour after it was rebuilt by NICHOLAS LEKE, Earl of Scarsdale in 1724. … The LEKE family held Sutton Hall for three hundred and thirty three years, through ten generations, until it was inherited by the fourth and last Earl Scarsdale, NICHOLAS LEKE, and it was he who had the present Hall built in 1724. The materials from the old Hall and incorporated some of its structure into the heart of his lavish new design. A notable feature was the fine decorative plasterwork by Italian artists Artari and Vassalli, traces of which can still be seen. Sadly, NICHOLAS LEKE died whilst heavily in debt due to his lavish rebuilding, and the Hall and its estates were purchased in 1740 by Godfrey Clarke of Somersall, whose son, also Godfrey, remained Lord of the Manor until 1786. … Sutton Hall’s restoration was finally completed in 1992, and now in the care of English Heritage, it is possible for visitors to walk inside the shell of Sutton Hall and to enjoy the magnificent vista across the Vale of Scarsdale – a prospect which will forever bear testimony to the vision and architectural triumph of NICHOLAS LEKE, the fourth and final Earl Scarsdale.”[176]

 

 

Dorset: - Parish Registers

Burialls

Marriages at Corscombe, 1595 to 1837.

Volume 6.

County: Dorset

Country: England

WILLIAM LEAKE, of Cattistock, & ELIZABETH ISAAC 25 Jul 1803.[177]

 

Hampshire: - Marriage License allegations, Bishop of Winchester, 1689-1837

  Allegations for Marriage Licences in Dampshire, in the Registry of the Bishop of Winchester.

   Volume 3.

County: Hampshire

Country: England

Cowdry, William, of Lower Wallop, & Mary Leake, of Faccombe, 23 Feb 1714.

 

Hampshire: - Marriage Licences, Bishop of Winchester, 1689-1837

  Allegations for Marriage Licences in Hampshire, in the Registry of the Bishop of Winchester.

   Addenda.

County: Hampshire

Country: England

Cowdry, William, of Lower Wallop, & Mary Leake, of Faccombe, 23 Feb 1714.

 

 

Kent: Canterbury - Marriage Licence allegations, Dean of Westminster, 1558-1699 and Vicar-General of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 1660 to 1679

  Marriage Allegations in the Registry of the Vicar=General of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

   1667.

County: Kent

Country: England

21 Aug 1667 Robert Bird, of Staple Inn, Gent., Bachr, abt 30, & Elizabeth Leake, of St Dunstan's West, Spr, abt 22; consent of her father William Leake, Stationer; at St Martin's in Fields or Fulham, co. Midx.

 

 

 


Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812

 Marriages at Lowdham, 1559 to 1812.

  Marriages at Lowdham, 1559 to 1812.

   Vol. 5

County: Nottinghamshire

Country: England

William Leake, p. Southwell, & Elizabeth Abbott, lic. 03 Jul 1810. [178]


Nottinghamshire: - Registers of Marriages, 1538-1812

 Marriages at Orston, 1590 to 1812.

  Marriages at Orston, 1590 to 1812.

   Volume 4.

County: Nottinghamshire

Country: England

William Leake & Elizabeth Higgins 13 Dec 1790. [179]


Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1837

 Marriages at Southwell, 1559 to 1837.

  Marriages at Southwell, 1559 to 1837.

   Volume 1.

County: Nottinghamshire

Country: England

William Lees and Elizabeth Leake 24 Oct 1667. [180]


Nottinghamshire: - Registers of Marriages, 1538-1812

 Marriages at Orston, 1590 to 1812.

  Marriages at Orston, 1590 to 1812.

   Volume 4.

County: Nottinghamshire

Country: England

William Leake & Sarah Cliff, w. 29 Dec 1774.[181]

 

 

Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1837. Marriages at Bleasby, 1573 to 1837. Volume 4. County: Nottinghamshire. Country: England. RICHARD WILSON, of Gibsmere, w., and HANNAH LEAKE 14 Mar 1763.[182]

 

Nottinghamshire: - Register of Marriages, 1559-1812. Marriages at Mansfield, 1559 to 1812. Volume 4. County: Nottinghamshire. Country: England. RICHARD WEBSTER & MARY LEAKE 20 Jun 1751.[183] 

 

RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1590 in [Harwich, Essex], England. He married ELIZABETH HARWICK. He died in 1660, in Harwich, Essex, England.

 

Barnfield, Richard [1599], Poems in The Passionate Pilgrime (1599) (In The Passionate Pilgrime. By W. Shakespeare (London: Printed for W. Iaggard, and are to be sold by W. Leake [etc.], 1599)) [BarnfR,PoemsIT].[184]

Carey, Henry [1735], Of Stage Tyrants. An Epistle to the Right Honourable Philip Earl of Chesterfield. Occasion'd by the Honest Yorkshire - Man being rejected at Drury - Lane Play - House, and since Acted at other Theatres with Universal Applause. By Mr. Carey (London: Printed for J. Shuckburgh, and L. Gilliver ... J. Jackson ... and J. Leake ... And sold by A. Dodd ... E. Nutt and E. Cook [etc.], 1735) [CareyH,OfSTAET].[185]

Chandler, Mary [1736], The Description Of Bath. A Poem. Humbly Inscribed To Her Royal Highness the Princess Amelia. By Mrs. Mary Chandler. The Third Edition. To which are added, Several Poems by the same Author. (London: Printed for James Leake, Bookseller in Bath, 1736) [ChandM,DescrOB].

Derrick, Samuel [1769], Derrick's Jests; or, The Wits Chronicle. Containing A pleasing Variety of Repartees, Puns, Bon - Mots, and other Species of Wit and Humour, Which passed between Samuel Derrick ... and other Persons distinguished for their Wit and Humour. Also A Collection of Poetical Pieces on Various Subjects, By Mr. Derrick and Others. Dedicated to the Public (London: Printed for I. Fell ... and sold by Mr. Leake, and Mr. Frederick [etc.], 1769) [DerriS,DerriJO].

 

Jenkyn, Pathericke [1661], Amorea, The Lost Lover. Or The Idea of Love and Misfortune. Being Poems, Sonets, Songs, Odes, Pastoral, Elegies, Lyrick Poems, and Epigrams. Never before printed. Written by Pathericke Jenkin (London: Printed for William Leake [etc.], 1661) [JenkyP,AmoreTL].

Ross, Alexander [1642], Mel Heliconium: or, Poeticall Honey, Gathered out of The Weeds of Parnassus ... By Alexander Rosse (London: Printed by L. N. and J. F. for William Leak [etc.], 1642) [RossA,MelHOPH].

Shakespeare, William [1599], The Passionate Pilgrime. By W. Shakespeare (London: Printed for W. Iaggard, and are to be sold by W. Leake [etc.], 1599) [ShakeW,PassiPB].

Watkyns, Rowland [1662], Flamma sine Fumo: or, poems without fictions. Hereunto are annexed the Causes, Symptoms, or Signes of several Diseases with their Cures, and also the diversity of Urines, with their Causes in Poetical measure. By R. W. (London: Printed for William Leake [etc.], 1662) [WatkyR,FlammSF].

Wesley, Samuel, the elder [1713], An Hymn on Peace. To the Prince of Peace. By Samuel Wesley (London: Printed by J. Leake, for Benj. Barker and Charles King, 1713) [WesleST,HymnOPT].

 

http://www.champenois.com/pafg07.htm#2290

John M. Leak was born 1758 in Amherst Co., VA. He died 24 Aug 1840 in Rutherford Co., TN. He married Mrs. Leak. Mrs. Leak was born Abt 1760. She died in Tennessee.

 

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~wayland/terrill/index3.htm

 

LEAKE, Elisha b.1730 - Goochland Co., VA

LEAKE, Elizabeth b.1732 - , Of Goochland Co., VA

LEAKE, Francis [Sir] b.1550 - , , , England

LEAKE, Jane b.1700 - Rocky Springs Co, Gchlnd, VA

LEAKE, John b.1718 -

LEAKE, Josiah b.1730 - Goochland, Gchlnd, VA

LEAKE, Judith b.1737 - Goochland, , VA

LEAKE, Judith Ann b.1688 -

LEAKE, Mary b.1690 - Goochland, , Virginia

LEAKE, Mary b.1715 - , , Virginia

LEAKE, Mask b.1734 - Goochland, Gchlnd, VA

LEAKE, Peter b.1696 -

LEAKE, Richard b.1629 - Harwich, Essex, , England

LEAKE, Richard b.1590 - , , , England

LEAKE, Richard b.1660 - Nottingham, , , England

LEAKE, Richard b.1702 - Rocky Springs Co, Gchlnd, VA

LEAKE, Samuel b.1724 - Goochland, Gchlnd, VA

LEAKE, Walter b.1635 - , , England

LEAKE, Walter b.1703 - Rocky Springs, Goochland Co., VA

LEAKE, William b.1693 - Goochland Co., VA

LEAKE, William b.1664 - Of Normandy, Notts., England

LEAKE, William b.1728 - Goochland, VA

 

 

 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~westxan/6581.htm

WILLIAM LEAKE JR. Compact Disc #12 Pin #167489

Born 1682, New Kent County, Virginia.

He died in 1784, in King & Queen Co, Virginia.

Father: WILLIAM LEAKE Colonel Disc #12 Pin #167493

Mother: MARY GREEN Disc #12 Pin #167494

He married FRANCES MAJOR Disc #12 Pin #167490

in 1705 in King & Queen Co, Virginia.

Submitter: Mr. Jody Dee Jones, 2619 Newgate Ct. Fort Collins, CO 80525-9006.

Submission Search: 27940-0331100103241

 

The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntington, Afterward Called Robin Hood of merrie Sherwodde: with his love to chaste Matilda, the Lord Fitzwaters daughter, afterwardes his faire Maide Marian. London: William Leake, 1601. 4o. [Ten copies of this printing are known to have survived.]. Black-Letter Editions.[186]

 

The Death of Robert, Earle of Hvntington. Otherwise Called Robin Hood of merrie Sherwodde: with the lamentable Tragedie of chaste Matilda, his faire maid Marian, poysoned at Dunmowe by King Iohn. London: William Leake, 1601. 4o. [Fourteen copies of this printing are known to have survived.] Black-Letter Editions.[187]

 

http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9037871

Great Plague of London was an epidemic of plague that ravaged London, Eng., from late 1664 to early 1666, killing perhaps more than 75,000 of a total population estimated at 460,000.

The Great Plague was not an isolated event; 40,000 Londoners had died of the plague in 1625; but it was the last and worst of the epidemics. It began in the late autumn of 1664 in London's suburb of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, and the greatest devastation remained in the city's outskirts, at Stepney, Shoreditch, Clerkenwell, Cripplegate, and Westminster, quarters where the poor were densely crowded. The epidemic was severe in the winter and revived and spread again in May 1665. The king and court fled from London in June and did not return until the following February; Parliament kept a short session at Oxford. The total number of deaths from plague in 1665, according to the bills of mortality, was 68,596; but this number is probably an underestimate, since many of the 6,432 deaths attributed to spotted fever were really caused by plague.

In December 1665 the mortality rate fell suddenly and continued down through the winter; in 1666 only 2,000 deaths were recorded. From London the disease spread widely over the country, but from 1667 on there was no epidemic of plague in any part of England, though sporadic cases appeared in bills of mortality up to 1679. This disappearance of plague from London has been attributed to the Great Fire in September 1666, but it also subsided in other cities without such cause. The decline has also been ascribed to quarantine, but effective quarantine was actually not established until 1720. The cessation of plague in England must be regarded as spontaneous. Daniel Defoe's vivid narrative in his Journal of the Plague Year (1722) is valuable as a picture of the time.[188]

 

Captain Studley at Bay Bulls 1702. The next specifically dated reference we have to St. Lawrence is at the beginning of the War of the Spanish Succession (Queen Anne's War), and here we shall quote Stephen Martin-Leakes biography of his uncle, SIR JOHN LEAKE, which went through three editions between 1726 and 1793. LEAKE, on the 18th of June, 1702, was informed that he had been appointed Commander-in-Chief to Newfoundland.[189] By the time LEAKE sailed for Newfoundland "He had likewise a commission appointing him Governor of the Island, and Commander-in-Chief of the land-forces, during the time he should be at Newfoundland; for the Commander-in-Chief of the King's ships at that place is always Governor of the Island whilst he is there." LEAKE left England on the 25th of July and, on the 26th of August[190]

 

in the morning they discovered the land, and the next day, in the morning, were off the Bay of Bulls. Soon after, Captain Studley, the Admiral of that harbour, came on board the Commodore, by whom he [Leake] was informed that there were two ships loading at Trepassy, and two other French ships of war at Placentia, and that most of their fishing vessels, which had made their voyages, were gone thither for convoy; that the French kept men upon the hills, over the Bay of Bulls, who, upon the arrival of any ships, immediately retired to give notice to them at Placentia, to which place it was about three days' journey.

 

Upon this intelligence, without staying to anchor, Commodore Leake proceeded that very evening to the southward of Placentia Bay. The 28th he took a small ship from Martinique bound to Placentia, and soon after, seeing four sail off Cape Pine, he ordered the Montagu and lichfield to chase them, whilst himself plied in for Trepassy where he saw two French ships, which about noon he took. In the afternoon he stood out of Trepassy, and was joined at night by the Iichfield with two of the four French ships he had chased. The 29th in the morning, off of St. Mary's, he chased a French fly-boat, which he bore away for St. Mary's, and at noon was joined by the Montagu with three French prizes; and having ordered the Medway, Lichfield, and Charles Galley for Collonet Bay, three leagues from St. Mary's, himself with the rest of the squadron stood away for St. Mary's, where he anchored in the afternoon, and found a French fly-boat, which, upon his approach, the enemy run ashore. Hereupon the Commodore ordered all the boats manned and armed, to attempt to get her off, which with some difficulty they performed. Soon after landing their men, they drove the French from the place, burning and destroying all the houses, together with all their stages for building ships, all their shallops and boats, some vessels that were already built, and others near finished, with everything belonging to them. And having entirely destroyed that settlement, he left the place at night, leaving the Assistance and Charles Galley, to proceed with the prizes to St. John's.

 

The next day he took a French fly-boat in Collonet Bay; and, having landed his men at Collonet, he entirely destroyed it, as he had done to that of Trepassy. His prize he dispatched under the same convoy as the former prizes at St. Mary's, with orders to those two commanders, when they had seen the prizes into St. John's, to cruise off Cape Race and the Banks for fourteen days. With the rest of the squadron he proceeded towards St. Lawrence and the island of St. Peters (both of them very considerable settlements of the French at the entrance of Fortune Bay). Being off of St. Lawrence, he discovered three sail, whereupon he left the Montagu and Medway to endeavour to get them out; and then to follow him to St. Peters.

 

The 1st of September, in the morning, he was fair in with St. Peter's with an intention of going into that harbour, but it blowing hard and likely to be bad weather, that it would be difficult to ride with a spring upon a cable, if they should meet with any opposition, as also a narrow harbour, and the ground without it very broken that the least miscarriage in anchoring might endanger them, the Comodore thought it advisable not to attempt going in till fairer weather.

 

Accordingly he stood off from the shore; but by good fortune, next morning, there being a fine breeze, they made in for the harbour, as they thought, and saw eight ships and small vessels off of the eastemmost point of the island, to which giving chase, they found the pilot had been under a mistake, for the Commodore discovered the harbour was on that side, and in it seven or eight ships at anchor; so had the weather been proper, and he had borne away the morning before for the place the pilots had always taken for the entrance of the harbour, he would not only have run the hazard of being driven to leeward of the island, but also of falling on a ledge of rocks, which lay off the westernmost end of the island. At noon he took one of the ships, laden with fish, and leaving the Lichfield in chase of another, himself tacked and plied in for the harbour, to secure the rest. But when he was within a quarter of a mile of the entrance, he discovered four sail, endeavouring to make their escape from the South Channel, which the pilots had affirmed to him was not navigable for any vessel that drew above five or six feet water: and observing that the rest loosed their topsails to go out the same way, he concluded they were very small ships, and thought it to no purpose to chase them, for it was then about seven at night and the wind right out of the harbour, which was not above half a mile over, and a dangerous rock in the middle of it, which appeared a very little above water; so that there was no attempting to turn in. Whereupon he drove under his topsails till it was dark, the better to amuse the enemy, but his real design was to stand for the South Channel to intercept them, had not the haziness of the weather prevented him; by which means they escaped, except one laden with salt, taken by the Lichfield. In the morning he plied in for the shore to look into the harbour, and by four in the afternoon was within a league and a half of it, but only the enemy's ships being got out of the harbour, he bore up to join the Lichfield, which he did in the evening.

 

He kept plying to windward with an easy sail all night, and in the morning, being the 4th of September, he bore away for St. Lawrence, to join the Montagu and Medway, of whose safety he was in some doubt, not having heard from them in all this time. At eleven o'clock he joined the former, who acquainted him that he parted from the Medway the night before, who was gone with four prizes to St. John's, two of which were part of them that escaped from St. Peter's, and the other two were taken at Great St. Lawrence; that they likewise burnt two sail at Little St. Lawrence, and destroyed all the houses, boats, stages, & c. at both those places, where they had been detained by contrary winds which was the reason they had not joined him before. It was then agreed to bear away for St. John's, in order to go to Chapear Rouge, on the north part of Newfoundland.

 

Leake returned to England on the 10th of November. Martin-Leake summarizes his voyage as follows:

In this expedition 51 ships were taken and destroyed. Whereof 29 were taken amounting to 3235 tons and 207 guns; and of them 16 were brought to England, 6 were sent to Lisbon, 5 sold at St. John's, 1 of 120 tons and 12 guns was left there for the security of the harbour, and the other sent to~Prance with the prisoners. The remainder, to the number of 22, were burnt with their cargoes, as well as a great part of the cargoes of those that escaped, who were glad to get away half loaded, or anyhow to avoid the fate of the rest: besides the burning and destroying Trepassy, St. Mary's, Collonet, Great and Little St. Lawrence, and St. Peter's, all very considerable settlements of the French at Newfoundland, and of the greatest importance for carrying on their fishery in those parts, and breeding of seamen.

 

Upon his return to England, Leake was offered a knighthood, which (modesty or delicacy?) he declined. One notices that in all of this there is no mention of Channel Islanders. The Channel Islands are, of course, the only French-speaking European islands belong to England. As noted earlier, LeMessurier, in his lecture on Placentia Bay, says "here [Little St. Lawrence) was situated from the very earliest times of occupation a Jersey Room. The Nicolles held it for centuries, and sold the property to Newman & Co. early in the nineteenth century." He also says "Jersey houses had been early in St. Lawrence, Burin, Mortier, Little Placentia and Placentia, and were in some cases in existence at the time of the French occupation of Placentia." We cannot be sure, not having specific dates for the Nicolle and Co. involvement.[191]

 

ELIZABETH LEAKE was born about 1498. She married John Hardwick. (John Hardwick was born about 1494 in of Hardwick, Derbyshire.)[192]

 

 

LEAKE COAT OF ARMS[193]

 

http://www.longislandgenealogy.com/HoytHawkins/names3.htm

 

 

SIR RICHARD LEAKE

I.     JOAN LEAKE239 was born about 1465. She died in 1488 in England.837 Joan was the daughter of SIR RICHARD LEAKE, a Knight. Joan married THOMAS WELBY, Esquire.

a.     THOMAS WELBY married CATHERINE BRAY. Thomas was born in 1484. Thomas died in 1524.[194] Thomas died in 1496, in Croyland, England. Thomas was the son of RICHARD WELBY. [195]

 

In 1708, a fresh campaign took place in Flanders. Marlborough gained another great victory at Oudenarde, and invested Lille, which was taken after a long siege. Another battle was won at Malplaquet. Minorca was taken by SIR JOHN LEAKE and General Stanhope; Nova Scotia was also taken from the French.[196]

 

 

RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1590 in England. He died in 1660 in England. [197]

 

RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1629 in Harwich, Essex, England. He died in Jul 1696 in Woolwich, Kent, England.[198]

 

1.     WALTER LEAKE was born in 1635, in Harwich, Essex, England. He died in 1700, in [Harwich, Essex], England. Walter married UNKNOWN in 1659 in Nottinghamshire, England. She was born in 1642, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England. Walter was the son of RICHARD LEAKE and ELIZABETH.[199],[200]

 

Children of WALTER LEAKE and UNKNOWN:

 

a.        RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1660, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England.[201] RICHARD LEAKE was born in 1675, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England.[202]  

 

Children of RICHARD LEAKE and UNKNOWN.

 

i.      WILLIAM LEAKE was born in 1705, in Orange, Virginia.[203]

 

b.       WILLIAM II MORRIS “ENGLISH BILLY” LEAKE was born 1664, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England.[204],[205] William II was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE I. William I was born in 1635 in Normandy, Nottingham, England. He died in 1700, in Normandy, Nottingham, England. William I was the son of RICHARD LEAKE. Richard was born in 1590 in Normandy, Nottingham, England. He married in 1632, in Normandy, Nottingham, England He died in 1645 in Normandy, Nottingham England. Richard was the son of SIR FRANCIS LEAKE. Francis was born in 1550 in Normandy, Nottingham, England. He married in 1588 in Nottingham, England. He died in 1610 in Normandy, Nottingham, England. He married MARY BOSTICK in about 1683/85, in [St. Peter’s Parish, New Kent, Virginia] [Rocky Springs or Goochland, Goochland County], Virginia. She was born in about 1665/1686/70, in Nottinghamshire, England. She died after 1717/18/20, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. WILLIAM LEAKE was born in 1664, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England.[206] He died in 1714/1725, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He was buried in Leake Cemetery, Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia. William married MARY BOSTICK in 1685, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. Mary was born in 1665, in Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England. She died in 1718, in Rocky Springs, Goochland Co., Virginia. She was buried in Leake Cemetery, Rocky Springs, Gochland Co., Viginia. William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and UNKNOWN. Mary was the daughter of WILLIAM BOSTICK and ELIZABETH FLOYD.[207] Mary was the daughter of CHARLES BOSTICK and MARY. Charles was born in 1640 in Upton Magna, Shropshire, England. Charles died on 04 Jan 1701, in St. Peter’s Parish, New Kent, Virginia. Mary died on 07 Dec 1709 in St. Peters, New Kent, Virginia. He died on 03/08 Sep 1714, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He was buried at Leake Cemetery, Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[208],[209] He came from Normandy, Nottinghamshire, England and settled in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia in 1685. Nickname: "English Billy."[210] William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and UNKNOWN. Children were: Walter Leake, Judith Ann Leake, Mary Leake, William Leake, Peter Leake, Jane Leake, Richard Leake.[211]

 

“The shire based on Nottingham, first referred to in the 11th century, when it had an ‘S’ at the beginning. The name Nottingham came from Old English Snot + inga + ham, meaning the homestead of the family of a man named Snot.”[212]

 

Children of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK:

 

i.         JUDITH ANN LEAKE was born in 1688, in Rocky Springs Goochland County, Virginia.[213] She married FRANCIS TAYLOR in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia. Francis was born in 1688, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland], Virginia. Judith was the daughter of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK.

(I)      SARAH RACHEL TAYLOR was born in 1711, in Moseley Junction, Henrico County, Virginia. He died in 1763/1777 in Buckingham County, Virginia.

ii.        MARY LEAKE was born 16 Apr 1699, [214] in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[215]

iii.      WILLIAM LEAKE was baptized on 15 Jul 1694,[216] in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[217] WILLIAM LEAKE[218] was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK.[219],[220]

iv.      PETER LEAKE was born 17 Mar 1697, [221] in Rocky Springs Goochland County, Virginia.[222]

v.       RICHARD LEAKE was born in 11 Dec 1702,[223] in Rocky Springs Goochland County, Virginia.[224] [Richard born before 13 Dec 1701.[225]]

vi.      JANE LEAKE was born 11 Jan 1700,[226](1698) in Rocky Springs Goochland County, Virginia.[227]

vii.    WALTER LEAKE was born 1684/1695/1685/87/95/1703/04, in Rocky Springs, Henrico County, now Goochland County, Virginia[228],[229] He died after his will was made in 31 Oct 1757, and before it was proved May 16, 1758, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MASK in 1710, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[230] Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in New Kent County, Virginia or in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia or in Richmond, North Carolina. Judith died in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK.[231] Judith was the daughter of JOHN MASK and MARTHA CHRISTIAN (ELIZABETH MARTHA JANE CHRISTIAN).[232] Family provided by Debra McCann. “Albemarle County, Virginia. Deeds Sep 5, 1747, WILLIAM GOOCH sold to Walter Leek 150 acres in Albemarle County on the branches of Hardway River, adjoining THOMAS FITZPATRICK and MILDRED MERIWETHER.” “Goochland County, Virginia. Will and Deed Book 7, pg. 279. Will of Walter Leake dated Oct 31, 1757 and proved May 16, 1758. Names wife, JUDITH; sons, JOSIAH, SAMUEL, JOHN, WILLIAM, MASK and ELISHA LEAK; daughters, MARY CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE JOHNSTON, JUDITH LEAKE and ELIZABETH COLEMAN; executers: wife, JUDITH LEAK and son JOSIAH LEAK.”[233],[234] “The LEAKES have been domiciled in Albermarle Co, VA since its formation. WALTER LEAKE, Jr., patented land on the south fork of Hardward in 1746, and John on Green Creek in 1748. It is believed these two were brothers. Data for accurately tracing the early relations of this family are wanting, but it is probable that JOHN LEAKE and his wife, ANN, were the parent s of SAMUEL and MASK.”[235]

 

WALTER LEAKE[236],[237] was born in 1687/1695/1703, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MASK about 1714/20/29, in [Rocky Springs], Goochland County, or Richmond, Virginia. Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in [Rocky Springs or Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. He died on 31 Oct 1757, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She died on 16 May 1758, in [Goochland, Goochland County, Virginia], or in Abbeville District, South Carolina. Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK. Children were: Mary Leake, John Leake, Samuel Leake, William Leake, Josiah Leake, Elisha Leake, Elizabeth Leake, Judith II Leake.[238] WALTER LEAKE [239] died on 16 May 1758 in Abbeville District, South Carolina. He was married to JUDITH MASK about 1729, in [Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in Abbeville District, South Carolina. Her parents were: JOHN MAST and MARTHA JANE CHRISTIAN. She married WALTER LEAKE in about 1729, in [Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. Children of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK were: Mary Leake,[240] John Leake,[241] Samuel Leake,[242] William Leake,[243] Josiah Leake,[244] Elisha Leake,[245] Elizabeth Leake,[246] Judith II Leake.[247]

 

WALTER LEAKE was born in 1685, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He died on 31 Oct 1757, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[248] LEAKE, Walter, senator, born in Virginia about 1760; died in Mount Salus, Hinds County, Mississippi, 17 November, 1825. He fought during the Revolutionary war, and afterward removed from Virginia to Hinds county, Mississippi, where he practised law. He was elected United States senator from that state, and served from 11 December, 1817, till 1820, when he resigned. Immediately afterward he was appointed a judge of the circuit court, and so continued till 1821, when he was chosen governor of Mississippi, which office he held till 1825.[249]

LEAKE, WALTER[250] (1762—1825). Senate Years of Service: 1817‑1820. Party: Democratic Republican. LEAKE, Walter, a Senator from Mississippi; born in Albemarle County, Va., May 25, 1762; served in the Revolutionary War; studied law; admitted to the bar and practiced; appointed by President Thomas Jefferson one of the United States judges for Mississippi Territory in 1807; moved to Hinds County, Miss., and engaged in the practice of law; upon the admission of Mississippi as a State into the Union was elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate and served from December 10, 1817, to May 15, 1820, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Indian Affairs (Sixteenth Congress); appointed United States marshal for the district of Mississippi in 1820; Governor of Mississippi 1821-1825; died in Mount Salus, Hinds County, Miss., November 17, 1825.  Fike, Claude E. “The Administration of Walter Leake (1822-1825).” Journal of Mississippi History 32 (May 1970): 103-15. Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present.

 

WALTER LEAKE (May 25, 1769November 17, 1825) served as a United States Senator from Mississippi (1817-1820) and as Governor of Mississippi (1822-1825). He was the first Governor of Mississippi to die in office. Leake County, Mississippi is named for him. A native Virginian, he was born in Albemarle County, VA, the son of CAPTAIN MASK LEAKE and nephew of REV. SAMUEL LEAKE (Princeton graduate and a member of the first Board of Trustees of Hampden-Sydney College), the ancestor of Senator John McCain of Arizona.[251]

 

LEAKE, WALTER (1762-1825) — of Mississippi. Born in Albemarle County, Va., May 25, 1762. Democrat. Federal judge, 1807; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1817-20; Governor of Mississippi, 1822-25; died in office 1825. Died in Mt. Salus, Hinds County, Miss., November 17, 1825. Interment at a private or family graveyard, Hinds County, Miss. Leake County, Miss. is named for him.[252]

 

LEAKE, WALTER, (1762 - 1825). Senate Years of Service: 1817‑1818; 1819‑1820. Party: Democratic Republican. LEAKE, Walter, a Senator from Mississippi; born in Albemarle County, Va., May 25, 1762; served in the Revolutionary War; studied law; admitted to the bar and practiced; appointed by President Thomas Jefferson one of the United States judges for Mississippi Territory in 1807; moved to Hinds County, Miss., and engaged in the practice of law; upon the admission of Mississippi as a State into the Union was elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate and served from December 10, 1817, to May 15, 1820, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Indian Affairs (Sixteenth Congress); appointed United States marshal for the district of Mississippi in 1820; Governor of Mississippi 1821-1825; died in Mount Salus, Hinds County, Miss., November 17, 1825.[253] Fike, Claude. “The Administration of Walter Leake.” Journal of Mississippi History 32 (May 1970): 103‑15.

 

WALTER JOHN LEAKE was born 1834 in North Carolina. He died in 1882. [Revolutionary War Pensioner Census, 1841. A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services, 1841. Richmond County. Name of pensioners for revolutionary or military services. Walter Leak, Senior, age 79. Names of heads of families with whom pensioners resisded June 1, 1840. Walter Leak, Senior. Page 140. “Census of Pensioners.” North Carolina.[254]]

 

1820 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE. (Born May 25, 1762). Not Stated Claiborne, Mississippi. Year: 1820Census Place: Not Stated, Claiborne, Mississippi; Roll: M33_58; Page: 5; Image: 13.

WALTER LEAKE. 0-1-0-0-3-1-0-1-1-0-1-0-17-0-0-5-4-4-1-11-2-3-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0.

Number of persons engaged in Agriculture: 17. Five MALE SLAVES under 14; four MALE SLAVES of 14 & under 26; four MALE SLAVES, of 26 & under 45; one MALE SLAVE of 45 & upwards. Eleven FEMALE SLAVES under 14; Two FEMALE SLAVES, of 14 & under 26; Three FEMALE SLAVES, of 26 & under 45; One FEMALE SLAVE, of 45 & upwards. Total of Slaves: 31.

I.              MALE LEAKE, of 10 & under 16

II.            MALE LEAKE, of 26 & under 45

III.         MALE LEAKE, of 26 & under 45

IV.          MALE LEAKE, of 26 & under 45

V.            MALE LEAKE, of 45 & upwards.

VI.          FEMALE LEAKE, of 10 & under 16

VII.       FEMALE LEAKE, of 16 & under 26

VIII.     FEMALE LEAKE, of 45 & upwards.

 

1830 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE. Not Stated. Albemarle, Virginia. 

1830 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE. Western Division, Mason County, Kentucky.

WALTER LEAKE.  0-0-0-1-0-0-0-0-1-0-0-0-0-2-1-1-1-1-0-0-1-0-0-0-0-0. Walter Leake was the second name from the bottom of the page.

 

1840 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE, Mason, Kentucky.

1840 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE, Not Stated, Henrico, Virginia.

 

1850 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE. Age: 82. Birth Year: 1768. Birth place: Virginia. Gender: Male. Home in 1850: District 2, Mason County, Kentucky. Year: 1850; Census Place: District 2, Mason, Kentucky; Roll: M432_212; Page: 125; Image: 590. Line 9. 986. 986. WALTER LEAKE, age 82. Farmer. $5800. Born in Virginia.

WALTER LEAKE was born on 28 Dec 1768, in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia. He died on 12 May 1847, in [Virginia or Kentucky??]. [255]

 

WALTER LEAKE.[256]

 

Woodson, Memphis, TN, 1915: pg 59, 60: Burial: 1757. Leake Cemetery, Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[257]

 

Goochland Co., VA Will and Deed Book 7, pg. 279. [258]

 

Will of Walter Leake dated Oct 31, 1757 and proved May 16, 1758 I lend to my daughter Elizabeth Coleman my negro girl Agge to wait on her and to work for her, her lifetime and after her decease the said Agge and her increase if she has any be equally divided amongst her children. [259]

 

Walter served as vestryman of St. James Parish. He inherited the plantation Rocky Springs where he died in 1758. [260]

 

1790. DBC-168. JAMES SMITH, JR. to JAMES SMITH, SR. and wife SARAH SMITH, SR., and MARY WARD JAMES SMITH, JR., of Richmond County, North Carolina, to JAMES SMITH, SR. and his wife SARAH SMITH SR., for fifty pounds, that part and parcel of land below the branch that runs through the field and begins at the back of a line of a hundred acre survey granted said JAMES SMITH, JR., up the CANAL, touching the line to [WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR., 30 Nov 1761-03 Jul 1844.] WALTER LEAK’s line and after the death of JAMES SMITH, SR. and his wife SARAH SMITH, SR., that MARY WARD enjoy all the land...during her present situation but should she return to her husband or marry after the death of her husband that the before mentioned land revert to JAMES SMITH, JR. 23 November 1790. Signed: JAMES SMITH, JR. Witnesses: JAMES TURNER, BENJAMIN SMITH, SIL (X) CHUNN. Testator: WM. LOVE.

 

1794. DBC-415. JAMES SMITH to BENJAMIN SMITH parcel of land north side of Little River beginning at a red oak at the foot of [WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR.] LEAK’s mountain. 330 acres, for 30 pounds currency. 16 July 1794. Signed: JAMES SMITH. Witnesses: JOHN SMITH, JOSEPH MOREHEAD, SR. Testator: WM. LOVE.

 

JOHN MASK -- Family provided by Debra McCann. Tax List 1704 Parish of St. Peters and St. Paul, New Kent Co., VA. Note: 1689 Processioning Records, St. Peter’s Parish Vestry Book. The lands of John Mask, John Peace and Robert Harman are among those named. VA Land Grants and Patents, Patent 9, pg. 503. Oct 28, 1702, a patent for 531 acres was issued to John Maske and Gabriel Hill, for transporting persons to VA. The land was described as being in the Pamunkey Neck in King William County, late part of King and Queen County, VA. Land Office Patents No. 9, 1697-1706 (v.1 & 2 p.1-742), p. 503 (Reel 9). Oct 28, 1702, A land Patent was issued to Grantees, John Maske and Gabriel Hill in King William Co., VA for 531 acres in Pamunkey Neck beginning &c. on Pacosamaco Creek at twenty eight poles up from the mouth thereof. Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume II, King and Queen Co., VA. Records Concerning 18th Century Persons, 4th Collection, Page 293. Sep 20, 1705, Deed of Partition, Gabriel Hill of King William Co., and John Mask of New Kent Co., having patented jointly 531 acres "being in King William Co., late part of King and Queen Co.," Oct 28, 1702, agree to a division. Bounds described as "beginning at an ash in the mouth of a branch upon Pamunkey River near the place where Samuel Arnal built his ship", etc. Signed Gabriel Hill, John Mask. Wit: John Baylor, John Waller, Thomas Derry. Rec. in King William Co., Oct 10, 1705. VA Historical Magazine, Vol 24, pg. 390. 1705 Deed, King Williams Co., VA, John Mask to John Monroe. 1708‑9 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book, pg. 162. Precinct 1: The lands of James Blackwell Sr, John Mask, James Blackwell Jr, Reese Hughes, John Ussery, Josias Simmons, Robert Harmon, Richard Ussery, Thomas Francis, John Glin (Glenn), Charles Wilford, George Merideth, and Samuel Merideth lying and adjacent to each other being made one precinct which the said James Blackwell Sr. and John Mask were required by an Order of Vestry to see processioned and make return according to law. These may certificate that we the subscribers have according to an Order of vestry dated ye 24th of September, Anno Domini 1708 for processioning of lands, have in obedience to that order; fulfilled it, and have peaceably and quietly processioned each man's land in our precinct the last day of November...and for Robt Harmon by his order John Mask Junr, John Blackwell, these we testifie to have seen done as witnesss our hands. Subscribed, James Blackwell and John Mask. 1711 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book. The lands of John Mask, Robt Harman and John Peece are among those being made one precinct. There is a note in the next Precinct which describes the process: "Beginning at a corner Tree Standing upon the river Bank dividing betwixt John Mask and James Blackwell Junr, John Mask being in our Company so far as his land joined our precinct, and also the said Mask at the request of Charles Willsford, was with us as far as the said Willfords Land joined upon our precinct..." 1715 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book. The lands of Jno Mask and Widdow Peace are among those being one precinct. In obedience to the within order we met to Procession: John Stroud, Thos Francis John Gunton Henry Crisp, Jonas Reynolds, Gabriel Heath, Thomas Maske & Joseph Peace, and we procession'd the within Lands. The report was made by John Mask. In the next precinct the processioning began at the tree on the river bank dividing between John Mask and James Blackwell, Jr. 1724 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book, pg. 97. At a Vestry held for the Lower Church ye 12th of June 1724. Present: Mr John Mask is among those named. 1731 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book. Oct 5, 1731, John Mask was among those who attended the St. Paul's Vestry meeting. 1732 Processioning Records, St. Paul's Parish Vestry Book. Precinct 15: (previously Precinct 5) Joseph Peace, John Maske, John Ussery and Samuel Peace are among those named. On Apr 11, 1732 two vestry men were elected to replace Col. John Syme and Mr. John Mask, deceased.[261]

 

Children of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK:

 

(I)            SAMUEL LEAKE was born in about 1724/33, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married ELIZABETH MORRIS, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.] He died between 1775 and 1776, in Albemarle County, Virginia. Samuel was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK.[262]

 

(II)         JOSHUA LEAKE was born 19 Mar 1729/30, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia [263] JOSHUA LEAKE was born 19 Mar 1728/29, in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia. He married ANNE FOSTER on 01 Jan 1759, in [Goochland, Virginia]. Anne Foster was born in 1738 in [Goochland, Virginia]. Anne died before 1795, in [Goochland, Virginia]. He married ANNE FENTON in 1759 in Henrico Co., Virginia, or in [Goochland, Virginia]. ANNE FENTON was born in abt 1738, in [Goochland, Virginia]. He married NANCY ANN MINTER in abt 1767, in [Goochland, Virginia]. Nancy was born in 1746 in [Goochland, Virginia]. He died in 1795, in [Goochland, Virginia]. He was buried in Leake Cemetery, Goochland County, Virginia. Joshua was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK.[264]

 

(A)  JOSIAH LEAKE born 1762 or earlier in [Goochland, Virginia]. He died in abt 1847, in [Goochland, Virginia]. He married ELIZABETH PORTER HATCHER in abt 1798, in [Goochland], Virginia. She was born 05 Aug 1777, in [Goochland], Virginia. She died 10 Aug 1857, in [Goochland, Virginia]. Josiah was the son of JOSHUA LEAKE and NANCY ANN MINTER.

 

Children of JOSIAH LEAKE and ELIZABETH PORTER HATCHER:

 

(1)   SAMUEL D. LEAKE was born 14 Feb 1783, in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia. He died in 1808.[265]

(2)   CHRISTIAN LEAKE was born 04 Dec 1780, in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia.[266]

(3)   JOHN MASK LEAKE was born 10 Sep 1778, in Rocky Springs, Goochland, Virginia.[267]

 

(III)       ELIZABETH LEAKE was born in 1730, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[268]

 

(IV)     WILLIAM LEAKE was born Mar 1734 in Albemarle, Virginia or NC. He married JUDITH ANN MOSELEY in 1754/61, in [Albemarle], Virginia. He died in 1797, in [Wadesboro], Anson County, North Carolina. She was born 20 Jul 1736, in Buckingham Co.,, Virginia.[269] She died in 1780, in Richmond, Virginia. WILLIAM LEAKE was born in 1730, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia[270] WILLIAM LEAKE was born in 1720/1726/28, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MOSELY, in 1761, in Buckingham County, Virginia. He died in 1776, in Anson County, North Carolina. William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK.[271],[272] WILLIAM LEAK/LEAKE was born 1720/28/29/34, in [Rocky Springs], Goochland County, Virginia or in Richmond, North Carolina.[273] He married JUDITH ANN MOSELY/ MOSELEY[274],[275] in about 1745/ 1757/ 1761, in Buckingham, Virginia or in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She was born about 1736/39 in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia], or in Richmond, North Carolina. He died in about 1797 or 1776, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She died in 1809, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK. Judith was the daughter of FRANCIS MOSELEY and ANNE LITTINGTON. WILLIAM LEAKE was born in 1720/1726/28, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MOSELY, in 1761, in Buckingham County, Virginia. He died in 1776, in Anson County, North Carolina. William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK.[276],[277] WILLIAM LEAK/LEAKE was born 1720/28/29/34, in [Rocky Springs], Goochland County, Virginia or in Richmond, North Carolina.[278] He married JUDITH ANN MOSELY/MOSELEY[279],[280] in about 1745/ 1757/ 1761, in Buckingham, Virginia or in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She was born about 1736/39 in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia], or in Richmond, North Carolina. He died in about 1797 or 1776, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She died in 1809, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. William was the son of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK. Judith was the daughter of FRANCIS MOSELEY and ANNE LITTINGTON. WALTER LEAKE served as vestryman of St. James Parish. He inherited the plantation Rocky Springs where he died in 1758. [281]  Goochland Co., VA Will and Deed Book 7, pg. 279.[282] Goochland Co., VA Will and Deed Book 7, pg. 279. Will of WALTER LEAKE dated Oct 31, 1757 and proved May 16, 1758. Names wife, JUDITH; sons, JOSIAH, SAMUEL, JOHN, WILLIAM, MASK and ELISHA LEAK; daughters, MARY CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE JOHNSTON, JUDITH LEAKE and ELIZABETH COLEMAN; executers: wife, JUDITH LEAK and son JOSIAH LEAK.[283] Will of WALTER LEAKE dated Oct 31, 1757 and proved May 16, 1758 I lend to my daughter Elizabeth Coleman my negro girl Agge to wait on her and to work for her, her lifetime and after her decease the said Agge and her increase if she has any be equally divided amongst her children.[284] Woodson, Memphis, TN, 1915: pg 59, 60: Burial: 1757. Leake Cemetery, Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[285] WALTER LEAKE [286] died on 16 May 1758 in Abbeville District, South Carolina. He was married to JUDITH MASK about 1729, in [Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in Abbeville District, South Carolina. Her parents were: JOHN MAST and MARTHA JANE CHRISTIAN. She married WALTER LEAKE in about 1729, in [Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. Children of WALTER LEAKE and JUDITH MASK were: Mary Leake,[287] John Leake,[288] Samuel Leake,[289] William Leake,[290] Josiah Leake,[291] Elisha Leake,[292] Elizabeth Leake,[293] Judith II Leake.[294]

WALTER LEAKE was born 1684/1695, in Virginia. in 1685/87/95/1703/04, in Rocky Springs, Henrico County, now Goochland County, Virginia.[295] He died after his will was made in 31 Oct 1757 and before it was proved May 16, 1758, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MASK in 1710, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[296] Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in New Kent County, Virginia or in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia or in Richmond, North Carolina. Judith died in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK.[297] Judith was the daughter of JOHN MASK and MARTHA CHRISTIAN (ELIZABETH MARTHA JANE CHRISTIAN).[298] Family provided by Debra McCann. Albemarle County, Virginia. Deeds Sep 5, 1747, William Gooch sold to Walter Leek 150 acres in Albemarle County on the branches of Hardway River, adjoining Thomas Fitzpatrick and Mildred Meriwether. Goochland County, Virginia. Will and Deed Book 7, pg. 279. Will of Walter Leake dated Oct 31, 1757 and proved May 16, 1758. Names wife, Judith; sons, Josiah, Samuel, John, William, Mask and Elisha Leak; daughters, Mary Christian, Christine Johnston, Judith Leake and Elizabeth Coleman; executers: wife, Judith Leak and son Josiah Leak.[299]

WALTER LEAKE[300] was born in 1687/1695/1703, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He married JUDITH MASK about 1714/20/29, in [Rocky Springs], Goochland County, or Richmond, Virginia. Judith was born on 14 Apr 1698, in [Rocky Springs or Goochland], Goochland County, Virginia. He died on 31 Oct 1757, in [Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia]. She died on 16 May 1758, in [Goochland, Goochland County, Virginia], or in Abbeville District, South Carolina. Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and MARY BOSTICK. Children were: Mary Leake, John Leake, Samuel Leake, William Leake, Josiah Leake, Elisha Leake, Elizabeth Leake, Judith II Leake.[301]

 

"WILLIAM LEAKE and his wife, JUDITH (MOSLEY) LEAKE, possibly had other children than those listed. They moved to North Carolina." (Miscellaneous Records Of Anson County, North Carolina, compiled by the Craighead-Dunlap Chapter DAR, Wadesboro, North Carolina, 1972, "Everett Sketches" by Capt. W. I. Everett, deceased, 1927, pages 132‑135; located in the Rockingham - Richmond County Library, Rockingham, North Carolina.) [302]

 

Additional information about the family of WILLIAM and HANNAH PICKETT LEAKE from Kinfolks, A Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1934, by William Curry Harllee. [303]

 

(Additional information from DAR Lineage Book, Vol. 46, pages 212‑213, lineage of Miss Mary Ledbetter Smith, #45503; Vol. 47, pages 288‑289, lineage of Mrs. Sallie S. S. Brown #46623; and Vol. 158 (1920), pages 115-116, lineage of Mrs. Sue Cole Winburn Waring #157360.)[304]

 

Children of WILLIAM LEAKE and JUDITH ANN MOSELY/MOSELEY:

 

(A)  JOHN MASK LEAKE was born in 1758, in Amherst, Virginia. He died on 24 Aug 1840, in Rutterford County, Tennessee.

 

(B)   LEAKE was born in [Amherst, Virginia].

 

(C)   LEAKE was born in [Wadesboro], Anson County, North Carolina.

 

(D)  FRANCIS “FRANK” LEAKE was born about 1759, in Anson, North Carolina. He died on 25 Oct 1786, in [Anson, North Carolina]. FRANCIS LEAKE was born in 1759, in [Wadesboro], Anson County, North Carolina. FRANCIS LEAKE was born in 1759, in [Wadesboro], Anson County, North Carolina. FRANCIS LEAKE was born about 1759, in Anson, North Carolina. He died on 25 Oct 1786, [Anson, North Carolina].

 

(E)   WALTER FRANCIS I LEAKE was born 30 Nov 1761, in Buckingham Co., VA. He died on 03 Jul 1844, in Anson, or Richmond, North Carolina, or Buckingham County, Virginia.[305] He married HANNAH PICKETT in 04 Apr 1783, in Anson Co., North Carolina. Hannah was born 20 Jul 1766, in [VA or NC]. He died on 03 Jul 1844, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.[306] She died on 01 Sep 1809, in [NC]. His parents were WILLIAM LEAKE (1734‑1797) and JUDITH MOSLEY. William served as a private in Capt John Mark's Company of Virginia militia. WILLIAM LEAKE moved to North Carolina in 1770 and settled on the Pee Dee River in Anson County, North Carolina. WALTER LEAKE enlisted as a private, at age 17, (in 1778) and served throughout the war.[307],[308],[309] Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and JUDITH MOSELEY.[310]

WALTER FRANCIS LEAKE was born 30 Nov 1761, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. He married HANNAH PICKETT. He died 03 Jul 1844, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. Hannah was born 20 Jul 1766, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. She died 01 Sep 1808/09, Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. Hannah was the daughter of WILLIAM PICKETT and MOURNING RAIFORD. Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and JUDITH ANN MOSELEY. WALTER FRANCIS LEAK was born on 30 Nov 1761, in Buckingham County, Virginia. He married HANNAH PICKETT, in 1783, in Virginia or North Carolina. Hannah was born on 20 Jul 1766 in Anson County, North Carolina. She died on 01 Sep 1809, in Rockingham, North Carolina.[311] Hannah was the daughter of WILLIAM PICKETT and MOURNING RAIFORD. He died on 03 Jul 1844, in Rockingham, North Carolina. "Walter Leak moved when a small child with his family to Anson County, North Carolina. He was a planter and Revolutionary soldier." (Kinfolks : A Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1934, by William Curry Harllee, page 254. Information about the family of William and Hannah Pickett Leake from "Kinfolks, A Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1934, by William Curry Harllee.) Walter Leake dropped the final "e" from the "Leake" name." (Leak family data complied by Mrs. J. L. Little of Morven, North Carolina, DAR, Wadesboro, North Carolina, 1937.) "Walter Leak and his wife, Hannah (Pickett) Leak came from the west side of the Pee Dee River in Anson County and first settled near Smith's Ford on Little River. Later they moved to a place nearby, one mile south of Rockingham, on Falling Creek." Miscellaneous Records Of Anson County, North Carolina compiled by the Craighead‑Dunlap Chapter DAR, Wadesboro, North Carolina, 1972, "Everett Sketches" by Capt. W. I. Everett, deceased, 1927, page 133; located in the Rockingham - Richmond County Library, Rockingham, North Carolina.)[312] "Richmond County, North Carolina. Deed of gift from WALTER LEAK, SENR. of county and state, to two grandchildren, ELI TERRY and FRANCIS TERRY, sons of WILLIAM TERRY – 09 November 1820." (Deed Book A, Vol. 1 (1820-25), page 11; abstracted in Alabama Records, Vol. 206, compiled by Kathleen Paul Jones and Pauline Jones Gandrud, July 1962, page 1.) (Note from Ralph Terry: These children and their father do not correspond to what I have for the family of SARAH CHILDS LEAK.)[313] (Additional information from DAR Lineage Book, Vol. 46, pages 212‑213, lineage of Miss Mary Ledbetter Smith, #45503; Vol. 47, pages 288‑289, lineage of Mrs. Sallie S. S. Brown #46623; Vol. 158 (1920), pages 115‑116, lineage of Mrs. Sue Cole Winburn Waring #157360; the Rockingham Post-Dispatch, Richmond County, North Carolina, 30 November 1949.)[314]

 

WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR. was born 30 Nov 1761, in Buckingham Co., VA. He married HANNAH PICKETT, in 1785, in North Carolina. He died on 03 Jul 1811, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC. He was buried in Leak-Covington Cemetery, Rockingham, Richmond Co., North Carolina.[315] 1800 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAK (SR.). Fayetteville, Richmond Co., NC. Year: 1800; Census Place: Fayetteville, Richmond, North Carolina; Roll: 33; Page: 243; Image: 180. 1-1-0-1-0//3-1-0-1-0-0-23. One male under 10, one male 10-15, one male 26-44, three females under 10, one female 10‑15, one 26-44, & 23 slaves. Walt’s wife, HANNAH PICKETT (LEAK), must have died prior to 1810 census. 1810 U.S. Federal Census. Year: 1810; Census Place: Not Stated, Richmond, North Carolina; Roll: 38; Page: 206; Image: 239.00. WALTER LEAK, (SR.), Not Stated, Richmond, NC. 2-1-0-0-1 // 0-1-0-0-0-0-28. Two males under 10, one male 10-15, one male 45 & over, one female, 10-15, & 28 slaves.

 

1820 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAK, SR., Not Stated Richmond, NC. Year: 1820; Census Place: Not Stated, Richmond, North Carolina; Roll: M33_81; Page: 186; Image: 116. 0-1-0-0-0-1-0-0-0-0-1//10-0-1-7-2-1-3-2-0-1-3-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0. One male of 10 & under 16, one male of 45 & upwards, one female of 45 & upwards. Ten Foreigners not naturalized. One person engaged in Commerce. Seven persons engaged in Manufactures. Two male slaves under 14. One male slave of 14 & under 26. Three male slaves of 26 & under 45. Two male slaves of 45 & upwards. One female slave of 14 & under 26. Three female slaves of 26 & under 45. (Total of 20 slaves) WILLIAM P. LEAK, 3-0-0-1-1-0-3-0-0-1-0//1-2-0-3-0-1-0-3-2-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0.

 

WALTER FRANCIS I LEAKE was born on 30 Nov 1761, in Anson, or Richmond, North Carolina, or in Buckingham County, Virginia.[316] He married HANNAH PICKETT in 1783, in [VA or NC]. Hannah was born 20 Jul 1766, in [VA or NC]. He died on 03 Jul 1844, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.[317] She died on 01 Sep 1809, in [NC]. His parents were WILLIAM LEAKE (1734‑1797) and JUDITH MOSLEY. William served as a private in Capt John Mark's Company of Virginia militia. WILLIAM LEAKE moved to North Carolina in 1770 and settled on the Pee Dee River in Anson County, North Carolina. WALTER LEAKE enlisted as a private, at age 17, (in 1778) and served throughout the war.[318],[319],[320] Walter was the son of WILLIAM LEAKE and JUDITH MOSELEY.[321]

 

Smith Family Deed Abstracts, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1785-1809.[322] 1787. DBA-6. 100. JAMES SMITH Land Grant 100 for fifty shillings, acres east of Little River near THOMAS MEGGINSON’S line, ASHLEY’s line, and [WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR. 30 Nov 1761-03 Jul 1844.] LEAK’s line. 9 August 1787. Signed: R.C. CASWELL.

 

WALTER LEAKE was born in 1685, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia. He died on 31 Oct 1757, in Rocky Springs, Goochland County, Virginia.[323] LEAKE, WALTER, senator, born in Virginia about 1760; died in Mount Salus, Hinds County, Mississippi, 17 November, 1825. He fought during the Revolutionary war, and afterward removed from Virginia to Hinds County, Mississippi, where he practised law. He was elected United States senator from that state, and served from 11 December, 1817, till 1820, when he resigned. Immediately afterward he was appointed a judge of the circuit court, and so continued till 1821, when he was chosen governor of Mississippi, which office he held till 1825.[324]

WALTER LEAKE.[325]

LEAKE, WALTER[326] (1762-1825). Senate Years of Service: 1817‑1820. Party: Democratic Republican. LEAKE, Walter, a Senator from Mississippi; born in Albemarle County, Va., May 25, 1762; served in the Revolutionary War; studied law; admitted to the bar and practiced; appointed by President Thomas Jefferson one of the United States judges for Mississippi Territory in 1807; moved to Hinds County, Miss., and engaged in the practice of law; upon the admission of Mississippi as a State into the Union was elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate and served from December 10, 1817, to May 15, 1820, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Indian Affairs (Sixteenth Congress); appointed United States marshal for the district of Mississippi in 1820; Governor of Mississippi 1821-1825; died in Mount Salus, Hinds County, Miss., November 17, 1825.  Fike, Claude E. “The Administration of Walter Leake (1822-1825).” Journal of Mississippi History 32 (May 1970): 103-15. Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present.

 

WALTER LEAKE (May 25, 1769November 17, 1825) served as a United States Senator from Mississippi (1817-1820) and as Governor of Mississippi (1822-1825). He was the first Governor of Mississippi to die in office. Leake County, Mississippi is named for him. A native Virginian, he was born in Albemarle County, VA, the son of Captain Mask Leake and nephew of Rev. Samuel Leake (Princeton graduate and a member of the first Board of Trustees of Hampden-Sydney College), the ancestor of Senator John McCain of Arizona.[327]

 

LEAKE, WALTER (1762-1825) — of Mississippi. Born in Albemarle County, Va., May 25, 1762. Democrat. Federal judge, 1807; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1817‑20; Governor of Mississippi, 1822-25; died in office 1825. Died in Mt. Salus, Hinds County, Miss., November 17, 1825. Interment at a private or family graveyard, Hinds County, Miss. Leake County, Miss. is named for him.[328]

 

Children of WALTER FRANCIS LEAKE and HANNAH PICKETT:

 

(1)     SARAH “SALLIE” CHILDS LEAKE was born 11 Nov 1784, in [Savannah Creek] Anson Co., or Hamlet, Richmond Co., NC.[329] in Richmond Co., or Cumberland Co. or [Wadesboro, Anson], North Carolina.[330] She married (1) REV. WILLIAM TERRY,[331] Methodist Minister, in about 1798, in Hamlet, Richmond Co, North Carolina. William was born in 1778, in [Savanah Creek] Anson, NC. He died on 16 Apr 1827, at age 49, in Autaugaville, Autauga County, Alabama. (2) JAMES LeGRAND VAUGHAN. She died in 1852 (bef 1860), in Hamlet, Richmond County, North Carolina]. Sarah was the daughter of WALTER FRANCIS LEAKE I and HANNAH PICKETT. William was the son of JAMES TERRY and NANCY ANN ROBARDS. James was born 19 Nov 1746 in [Savannah Creek, Anson Co., NC]. He died 27 Mary 1816, in [Savannah Creek, Anson Co., NC]. He married REBECCA ANN NANCY ROBARDS on 24 Jan 1771, in [Savannah Creek, Anson Co., NC]. She was born 13 Feb 1758, in [Savannah Creek, Anson Co., NC]. James was the son of WILLLIAM TERRY and MARY RAIFORD.[332]CORNELIUS ROBINSON (brother of CHARLES ROBINSONSR.) bought 360 acres on Pee Dee River in Anson County, from WILLIAM TERRY, of Lunenburg County, Va. (formerly).”[333] Will of William Terry probated Anson Co. North Carolina 1782 names wife Mary; sons James and daughters Martha Pickett, Mourning Coleman, Margaret Smith, and relation unknown Elizabeth Hellams.[334],[335] Anson was created in 1750 from Bladen County NC.[336] REV. WILLIAM TERRY "Died in Autauga County, on the 16th inst. at the residence of Tod Robinson, Esq. the Rev. William Terry, in the 49th year of this age. ... Mr. Terry was a minister of the gospel for more than twenty years. ... He was a father; his children can testify to the many acts of paternal affection. He was a husband. ... The extensive circle of his friends in Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he was for many years an eminent merchant, and where he was for a long period zealously devoted, as a faithful shepherd, over the flock committed to his charge. ... The revolution incident to commercial transactions which no human foresight can control, and which often affects the best of men, brought Mr. Terry to this country. Circumstances made him a private citizen in the most retired walks of life. ..." (Obituary, Alabama Journal, Montgomery, Alabama, Friday, April 20, 1827 {copy in file}.)[337] (Copied from "Descendants of Elias Wreyford" put online by Ralph Terry.)[338]

 

Children of SARAH CHILDS LEAKE and WILLIAM TERRY:

 

(a)       ELI TERRY was born in 1799, in Richmond, NC.[339] He married POLLEY PICKETT on 17 Dec 1799, in Richmond Co., North Carolina. County Court Records - FHL #0019684, 0500948 and 0873681, Item 3. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT.[340]

(b)       ANN ROBINSON TERRY was born 17 APR 1801, in Richmond Co., NC.[341] He married BEVERLY ROSE on 04 Aug 1817, in Cumberland Co., NC. County Court Records at Fayetteville, North Carolina – Family History Library (FHL) #0540270 and #0546446-0546454.[342]

(c)       FRANCIS TERRY was born ABT. 1803 in Richmond, NC.[343]

(d)       MARTHA TERRY was born 1804, in Richmond, NC.[344] She married JAMES S. RICHARDSON on 26 Apr 1820, in Cumberland Co., NC. County Court Records at Fayetteville, NC and Family History Library (FHL) #0540270 and #0546446-0546454.[345]

(e)       WILLIAM LEAKE TERRY, JR. was born 1806, in Richmond, NC..[346] He married SOPHIA A. McGEHEE on 06 Sep 1830, in Person Co., NC. Source Vendor: County Court Records at Roxboro, North Carolina, and Family History Library (FHL) #0962911, Item 7 and #0924086, Item 3.[347]

(f)        JAMES LEAKE TERRY was born 01 JUL 1808 in Richmond, NC.[348]

(g)       HANNAH LEAKE TERRY was born 1811 in Richmond, NC. She married JOHN O. WITHERINGTON, on 23 Sep 1850, in Craven, North Carolina. County Court Records at New Bern, North Carolina – Family History Library (FHL) #0296803-0296808.[349]

(h)       WALTER LEAKE TERRY was born 1813 in Richmond, NC.[350]

(i)        ELIZA JANA TERRY was born 1816 in Cumberland County, NC. She married DANIEL GEORGE on 08 Apr 1852, in New Hanover, NC. County court records located at Wilmington, North Carolina or Family History Library (FHL) microfilm #0276138-0276142. OR ELIJAH MARTIN on 14 Jun 1866, in Rockingham Co., NC. North Carolina State Archives  [351]

(j)        FRANCIS AUGUSTUS TERRY was born 1820 in Cumberland County, NC.[352]

(k)       JULIA MOSELEY TERRY was born 1823, in Cumberland County, NC. She married JAMES WEDDIN, on 15 Jun 1854, in Johnston Co., NC.[353]

(l)        PRISCILLA TERRY was born in 1824, in Richmond Co., NC. She married HILLIARD WILLIAMS on 19 Sep 1849, in Wake, North Carolina. County Court Records at Raleigh, NC and Family History Library (FHL) #0296867-0296870 and #0418152, Item 2. [354]

(m)      BEVERLY ANN TERRY was born BET. 1824-1825, in Cumberland County, NC.[355]

(n)       CHARLES C. TERRY was born 28 NOV 1827 in Alabama.[356]

 

(2)   FREDERICK[357] A. LEAK[358],[359],[360],[361] was born in 1785, in [Hamlet, Richmond County, NC] or in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina or Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. [Note: Leak Cemetery is near Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.] FREDERICK LEEK, at age 27, married MARY ANN RABB-MARY ROBB-HILLARY ROBB on 11 Apr 1812, in Natchez, Adams County, Mississippi.[362],[363],[364],[365],[366] Mary was born about 1795, in Adams or Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Mary died after 1850 and before 1860, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Frederick died before 14 Apr 1829, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.

FREDERICK[367] A. LEAK[368],[369],[370],[371] was born in 1785, in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina or Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. [Note: Leak Cemetery is near Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.] FREDERICK LEEK, at age 27, married MARY ANN RABB-MARY ROBB-HILLARY ROBB on 11 Apr 1812, in Natchez, Adams County, Mississippi.[372],[373],[374],[375],[376] Mary was born about 1795, in [Natchez], Adams or Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Mary died after 1850 and before 1860, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Frederick died before 14 Apr 1829, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.

 

FREDERICK LEEK Baptismal records from St. Mary's Cathedral in Natchez, Mississippi, dated September 18, 1821, state that JOHN and AMANDA ANN are children of FREDERICK LEEK and MARY RABB. Both of them are four years old, in 1821, so they must have been twins. The Godmother for both of them was CECILIA RABB and the Godfather's name looks like GERAS ARNANDUS. FREDERICK A. LEEK'S will is about 18 pages. Their known children were: THOMAS A., SAMUEL, AMANDA ELIZABETH, MARTHA A., ANTHONY WILLIAM. There is a baptismal record of ANTHONY WILLIAM LEEK.  The following names are mentioned in the Will of Frederick Leek: ELIZABETH JANE, JOSEPH R. and ALEXANDER P. LEEK/LEAK/LEAKE.[377] [Children are: THOMAS, SAMUEL, AMANDA (AMANDA ANN OR AMANDA ELIZABETH), MARTHA M., ELIZA, JOSEPH, ALEXANDER, JOHN.[378]]

 

Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935. Name: Mary Rabb. Spouse: FREDERICK LEEK. Marriage Date: 11 Apr 1812. County: Adams. 1820 United States Federal Census. Not Stated, Wilkinson County, Mississippi has last name spelled Leake. Per Carolyn Switzer: The date of FREDERICK LEAKE'S estate inventory of the deceased was 14 April 1829. In the 1830 census, his wife MARY ANN LEAKE appears as head of household. In the 1850 census, MARY is shown at age 55, living in the household of Joseph, who is 27 years old. Also living in this household was ALEXANDER, age 22. If Mary was 55 in 1850 then she was probably born in 1795 and was 17 when she married. Land description: Bounded on North by Buffalo Creek, South by public lands, west by lands of Spencer Wood. Date of land grant was 10 Jan 1818 Section 23 Township 3 Range 2W containing 490 acres. According to the 1900 Census his son, ALEXANDER states that his father, FREDERICK A. LEAKE, was born in North Carolina. FREDERICK died between April 22, 1828 and April 4, 1829 since it is documented in the "Woodville Republican" that on April 22, 1828, "John Price wishes to sell land before returning to Kentucky. Land will be shown by Mr. FREDERICK LEAKE." On April 4, 1829, the "Woodville Republican" states "Mary A. Leake appointed Admr's for deceased FREDERICK LEAKE'S estate."[379]

 

1825 Wilkinson County Census A-L.[380] LDS Microfilm # 0899870.[381] “I Thos. B. I? Hadley, assessor and collector of Wilkinson County do certify that the foregoing is a correct return of all the taxable inhabitants, white males and females, slaves, and births and deaths of white persons to the best of my knowledge and belief. Jany 12 1825?  T. B. I.  Hadley A. C. W.C. LEAKE, FREDRICK --- 1-6-1-0-0-0. White taxable inhabitants: 1. Slaves: 6. White Males: 1. White Females: 0. Deaths: 0. Births: 0.

 

Administrators bonds, 1825 to 1833: Index to Administration Book. LEAKE, FREDIRICK, 111.[382] Wilkinson County, Mississippi Court Minutes - April Term, 1823. Wilkinson county, Mississippi court minutes 1822-1824. LDS[383] microfilm # 0877088. Page 37. Jno.G Buckholl vs B.M. Eads. Fugua Adm of Dixson vs.  Same. Thos. North vs same. E & B Jones vs same. The defendant came into court, was imprisoned, came into open court and took the benefit of the act for the relief of insolvent debtors and was ordered to be discharged from the custody of the sheriff. The state vs. Dave, a Negro, brought into court, pleaded not guilty. The following jurors were called: 1. FREDERICK LEAKE[384]; 2. John Gomer; 3. Isaac E. Ogden; 4. John Land; 5. Wm. F. Pacquinett; 6.  Jesse Teakle; 7. William M. Alexander; 8. Darling McGraw. 9. James Meek; 10. Austin Coats; 11. John Jemison; 12. Thomas Dawson, Jun. Jury do find the prisoner guilty ordered that Henry Nickoson a Juror be excused from attending his court tomorrow. The state vs. Dave  prisoner to remain in prison. Page 38. April Term 1823. Ordered that the court be adjourned until tomorrow morning.  Th. H. Proper presiding. Wednesday 9th of April 1823. Thomas H.Proper presiding justice. Edward McGehee Esq associate Justice. Hugh Connell sheriff. Benjamin Eccles clerk. 

 

1820 U.S. Federal Census. FREDERICK LEAKE. Home in 1820: Not Stated, Wilkinson, MS. Year: 1820; Census Place: Not Stated, Wilkinson, Mississippi; Roll: M33_58; Image: 181.

3-0-0-0-1-0-2-0-1-0-0-0-30-0-0-8-4-6-2-4-3-16-?. Total: 52.

 

1820 U.S. Federal Census. WALTER LEAKE, Home in 1820: Not Stated, Claiborne, MS. Year: 1820; Census Place: Not Stated, Claiborne, Mississippi; Roll: M33_58; Page: 5; Image: 13. 0-1-0-0-3-1-0-1-1-0-1-0-17-0-0-5-4-4-1-10-2-3-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0.

 

1880 U.S. Federal Census. Home in 1880: Beat 5, Wilkinson, Mississippi. Year: 1880Census Place: Beat 5, Wilkinson, Mississippi; Roll: T9_669; Family History Film: 1254669; Page: 565.1000; Enumeration District: 154; Image: 0185.

ALEXANDER (ALEX) P. LEAKE/LEEK, age 53, head, Farmer, born Jan 1827, in [Wilkinson], Mississippi. He died on 19 Aug 1900. Father born in SC. Mother born in MS. Alex was the son of FREDERICK A. LEAKE and MARY ANN RABB.

LUCY LEAKE, age 44, wife, Housekeeper, born 1836, in Missouri. Father born in NC. Mother born in Missouri. Race: White. Spouse: ALEX P. LEAKE.

HARDY LEAKE, age 18, son, Farm Laborer, born 1862, in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in Missouri.

WILLIAM LEAKE, age 16, son, Farm Laborer, born in MS. Father born 1864, in MS. Mother born in Missouri.

CARROL LEAKE, age 14, son, At School, born in MS. Father born 1866, in MS. Mother born in Missouri.

EMANUEL LEAKE, age 2, son, born 1878, in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in Missouri.

ELIZA WHITE, age 28, niece, Boarder, born 1852, in MS. Both parents born in MS.

 

MARY A. LEAKE. 1830 U.S. Federal Census. Home in 1830: Not Stated, Wilkinson, Mississippi. Year: 1830; Census Place: Not Stated, Wilkinson, Mississippi; Roll: 71; Page: 287. 4th name from top of page. Schedule of the whole number of Persons within the Division allotted to John L. Bruce by the Marshal of the Mississippi District (or Territory) The United States. MARY A. LEAKE was born 1795, in Mississippi. [Note: Was Frederick dead by 1830? He would have been 45 years old in 1830.]

1-1-1-2-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-1-1-1-0-0-1-0-0-0-0-0-0.

I.         FEMALE LEAKE of 30 & under 40.

II.            MALE LEAKE of 20 & under 30.

III.         MALE LEAKE of 15 & under 20.

IV.          MALE LEAKE of 15 & under 20.

V.            MALE LEAKE of 10 & under 15.

VI.          FEMALE LEAKE of 10 & under 15.

VII.     MALE LEAKE of 5 & under 10.

VIII.     FEMALE LEAKE of 5 & under 10.

IX.          MALE LEAKE under age 5.

X.             FEMALE LEAKE under age 5.

 

The deceased FREDERICK LEAKE'S estate inventory was dated 14 April 1829. In the 1830 census his wife, MARY ANN LEAKE, appears as head of household. In the 1850 census Mary is shown at age 55, living in the household of JOSEPH LEAKE, 27 years old. Also living in this household was ALEXANDER, age 22. If Mary was 55 years old in 1850 then she was probably born in 1795 and was 17 when she married.

 

 

1850 U.S. Federal Census. Not Stated, Wilkinson County, MS. Year: 1850Census Place: Not Stated, Wilkinson, Mississippi; Roll: M432_382; Page: 296; Image: 600. Enumerated August 31, 1850. Line 29. 448. 452. MARY A. LEAKE, age 55, in 1850, born in 1795, in Mississippi, widow of FREDERICK A. LEAKE.

Image: 600. Line 29. 448. 452. F.V. STEVENS, age 21, Planter, born in MS.

MARY A. LEAKE, age 53, $1600, born in MS.

JOSEPH R. LEAKE age 27, Planter, born in MS.

ALEX P. LEAKE, age 22, Planter, born in MS.

E. J. WHITE, age 2, born in MS.

 

FREDERICK A. LEAKE Land Description: Bounded on North by Buffalo Creek, South by public lands, West by lands of Spencer Wood. Date of land grant was 10 Jan 1818, Section 23, Township 3, Range 2W, containing 490 acres.

 

According to the 1900 Census his son, ALEXANDER LEAKE states that his father, FREDERICK A. LEAKE, was born in North Carolina.

 

Frederick died between April 22, 1828 and April 4, 1829, since it is documented in the Woodville Republican that, on April 22, 1828, "John Price wishes to sell land before returning to Kentucky. Land will be shown by Mr. Frederick Leake." On April 4, 1829, the Woodville Republican states "Mary A. Leake appointed Admr's for deceased Frederick Leake's estate."

 

FREDERICK A. LEAKE was born about 1785, in North Carolina. He died before 14 Apr 1829, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He married MARY ANN RABB on 11 Apr 1812, in [Natchez], Adams County, Mississippi. Mary was born in about 1795. She died after 1846 in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Mary was the daughter of NICHOLAS RABB, born about 1766 and MARTHA CLARK born 21 Oct 1773, in [Wilkinson, Mississippi].[385],[386]

 

MARY ANN RABB was born on 21 Apr 1818/21 Jul 1818/04 Jul 1818, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi or on 04 Jul 1818, in Wilkinson, Mississippi. [Note: Perhaps she was born on 21 Apr 1818 and baptized on 21 Jul 1818, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi.] Mary was the daughter of JOHN NICHOLAS RABB and CECELIA CLARK.[387] John was the son of JOHN NICHOLAS RABB and MARGARET FITE. John was born on 07 Mar 1772, in [Natchez, Adams], Mississippi. John married CECELIA CLARK on 08 Jan 1798, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi. John died on 10 Sep 1829, in [Natchez, Adams, Mississippi]. Cecelia was born on 31 Jul 1776, in [Natchez, Adams, Mississippi]. Cecilia died on 10 Mar 1829, in [Natchez, Adams, Mississippi].

 

MARY ANN RABB was born on 04 Jul 1818, in Wilkinson, Mississippi. Mary was the daughter of JOHN RABB and MARTHA CLARK.[388]

 

MARY ANN RABB was born on 21 Apr 1818, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi. Mary was the daughter of JOHN NICHOLAS RABB and CECELIA CLARK.[389],[390] John was born on 07 Mar 1776, in Wüerttemberg, Germany. He married CECELIA CLARK in 1797. Cecelia was born about 1780, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi.

 

MARY A. RABB was born in about 1791, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi. He married FREDRICK A. LEAKE about 11 Apr 1812, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi. Fredrick died in about 1829, in Natchez, Adams, Mississippi. [391]

 

FREDERICK LEEK married MARY ROBB on 10 Apr 1812, in [Natchez], Adams County, Mississippi.[392]

 

Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935. Name: Mary Rabb. Spouse: FREDERICK LEEK. Marriage Date: 11 Apr 1812. County: Adams. 1820 United States Federal Census. Not Stated, Wilkinson County, Mississippi has last name spelled Leake. Per Carolyn Switzer: The date of FREDERICK LEAKE'S estate inventory of the deceased was 14 April 1829. In the 1830 census, his wife MARY ANN LEAKE appears as head of household. In the 1850 census, MARY is shown at age 55, living in the household of Joseph, who is 27 years old. Also living in this household was ALEXANDER, age 22. If Mary was 55 in 1850 then she was probably born in 1795 and was 17 when she married. Land description: Bounded on North by Buffalo Creek, South by public lands, west by lands of Spencer Wood. Date of land grant was 10 Jan 1818 Section 23 Township 3 Range 2W containing 490 acres. According to the 1900 Census his son, ALEXANDER states that his father, FREDERICK A. LEAKE, was born in North Carolina. FREDERICK died between April 22, 1828 and April 4, 1829 since it is documented in the "Woodville Republican" that on April 22, 1828, "John Price wishes to sell land before returning to Kentucky. Land will be shown by Mr. FREDERICK LEAKE." On April 4, 1829, the "Woodville Republican" states "Mary A. Leake appointed Admr's for deceased FREDERICK LEAKE'S estate."[393]

 

Children of FREDERICK A. LEAK and MARY ANN RABB:

 

1.       THOMAS LEAK was born 1813, in Adams Co. or Wilkinson County, MS. He died before 1848. He married ELLEN REBECCA BECK on 12 Feb 1833, in Wilkinson Co., MS. Thomas was the son of FREDRICK A. LEAKE and MARY ANN RABB[394],[395] THOMAS LEAK married REBECCA BECK on 12 Feb 1833, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.[396]

2.       SAMUEL LEAK was born 1816, in Adams Co., or Wilkinson County, MS.[397] SAMUEL LEEK married LYDIA WHITE on 04 Oct 1846, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.[398] The 1850 and 1860 U.S. Census, Wilkinson County, Mississippi. On the 1860 census, the family’s last name is spelled “Leek.” This has been spelled this way on several records. On the 1860 census, 22 year old MARY J. STEWART resided with the family, with no relationship data.[399] Samuel married LYDIA WHITE on 04 Oct 1846, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Lydia was born in May 1830 in Mississippi. Lydia was the daughter of ANDREW WHITE. SAMUEL LEEK, self, married, male, white, age 66, born 1814, in MS. Farmer. Father’s birthplace: TN. Mother’s birthplace: MS. ANNIE LEEK, daughter, single, age 17, born in MS. At School. Both parents born in MS. C.C. LEEK, daughter, single, age 14, born in MS, At School, both parents born in MS.  M.E. LEEK, daughter, single, age 13, born in MS, At School, both parents born in MS.  GEORGE W. LEEK, son, age 9, born in MS. Both parents born in MS. A.J. LEEK, son, age 7, born in MS. Both parents born in MS. 1880 U.S. Federal Census. Census Place: Beat 4, Wilkinson, MS. Family History Library Film: 1254669. NA Film No. T9‑0669. Page No. 537B. Samuel’s wife, LYDIA WHITE LEAKE was not listed on the 1880 census with their family, so she might have died prior to 1880. SAMUEL LEAKE was born in 1816, in Wilkinson, Mississippi. He married LYDIA WHITE on 04 Oct 1846, in Wilkinson, Mississippi. Lydia was born in May 1830 in [Wilkinson County], Mississippi. Lydia was the daughter of ANDREW WHITE.

 

Children of SAMUEL LEAK and LYDIA WHITE:

 

a.        MARY ELIZABETH LEAKE was born in 1847, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. MARY E. LEEK married COLUMBUS HANEY on 24 Nov 1869, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.[400]

 

b.       FREDERICK A. LEAKE, Jr. was born 29 Jul 1850 in Wilkinson Co., MS. He died 20 Jul 1919, in Wilkinson Co., MS.[401] FREDERICK A. LEAKE was born on 29 Jul 1850 in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He married LYDIA REBECCA CARTER on 22 Feb 1872, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He died on 20 Jul 1919, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He was buried in Pioneer Cemetery. Lydia was born 17 Aug 1853, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. She died 11 Apr 1904, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. She was buried in Old Pioneer Cemetery.[402] FREDERICK A. LEAKE born 29 Jul 1850, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He died 20 Jul 1919, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. He was buried in Pioneer Cemetery. He married LYDIA REBECCA CARTER on 222 Feb 1872, in Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Frederick was the son of SAMUEL LEAKE and LYDIA WHITE.

 

c.        ALEXANDER BOYD LEAKE was born 26 Jun 1851 in Wilkinson Co., MS. He died 29 Jul 1925, in Wilkinson Co., MS. He was buried at Netterville 2 Cemetery. Alexander was the son of SAMUEL LEAKE and LYDIA WHITE. 1860 United States Federal Census. Not Stated, Wilkinson County, Mississippi, has family name of Leek. He is listed as Alexander Leek, age 9, born in MS. He married MARY CATHERINE NETTERVILLE on 03 Jan 1873 in Adams County, MS.

 

Children of ALEXANDER BOYD LEAKE and MARY CATHERINE NETTERVILLE:

 

i.         FREDERICK PADDOCK LEAKE b: 10 Jan 1876 in Mississippi.

ii.     WILLIAM NETTERVILLE LEAKE b: 5 Oct 1877 in Mississippi.

iii.    OLLIE LEAKE b: 25 Jan 1880 in Mississippi.

iv.    CHAUNCEY LEAKE b: 16 Jan 1882 in Mississippi.

v.     LEONA LEAKE b: 4 Jan 1884 in Mississippi.

vi.    LYDIA LEAKE b: 25 Nov 1885 in Mississippi.

vii.   MARY ELLA LEAKE b: 5 Mar 1887 in Mississippi.

viii.  ALEX BOYD LEAKE b: 28 Oct 1892 in Mississippi.

ix.    EMILY CATHERINE LEAKE b: 1 Oct 1894 in Mississippi.

x.     ORILLA LEAKE b: 22 Jun 1898 in Mississippi.

xi.    ELBERTINE LEAKE b: 1 May 1900 in Mississippi.

 

j.         JOSEPH RABB LEAKE b: 25 Oct 1853 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

k.       SUSAN E. LEAKE b: Abt 1856 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

l.         THOMAS A. LEAKE b: Abt 1857 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

m.     SARAH A. LEAKE b: Abt 1861 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

n.       ANNA LEAKE b: Dec 1863 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

o.       KATE LEAKE b: Oct 1865 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

p.       ERNEST MALCOLM LEAKE b: 30 Jan 1866 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

q.       GEORGE D. LEAKE b: Apr 1871 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

r.        ARTHUR JACKSON LEAKE b: 16 Nov 1873 in Wilkinson Co., MS.

 

3.     AMANDA LEAKE was born 1818, in Wilkinson County, MS. [403]

4.     MARTHA MARGARET LEAKE was born 1820, in Wilkinson County, MS. [404]

5.     ELIZABETH JANE “ELIZA” LEAKE was born 1822, in Wilkinson County, MS. [405]

6.     JOSEPH R. LEAKE was born 1823, in Wilkinson County, MS.[406] 1850 U.S. Federal Census. Not stated, Wilkinson County, MS. Enumerated August 31, 1850. Year: 1850; Census Place: Not Stated, Wilkinson, Mississippi; Roll: M432_382; Page: 296; Image: 600. Line 29. 448. 452. F.V. STEVENS, age 21, Planter, born in MS.

MARY A. LEAKE, age 53, $1600, born in MS.

JOSEPH R. LEAKE age 27, Planter, born in MS.

ALEX P. LEAKE, age 22, Planter, born in MS.

E. J. WHITE, age 2, born in MS.

7.     ALEXANDER P. LEAKE was born Jan 1827, in Wilkinson County, MS. [407] He died 19 Aug 1900. 1880 U.S. Federal Census. ALEX P. LEEK, self, married, male, white, age 53, born in MS, Farmer, Father born in SC. Mother born in MS. LUCY MEEK, wife, married, female, white, age 44, born in MO, Housekeeper, Father born in NC. Mother born in MO. HARDY LEEK, son, single, age 18, born in MS. Farm Laborer. Father born in MS. Mother born in MO. WILLIAM LEEK, son, single, age 16, born in MS, Farm Laborer, Father born in MS, Mother born in MO. CARROLL LEEK, son, age 14, born in MS, At School, Father born in MS. Mother born in MO. EMANUEL LEEK, son, age 2, born in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in MO. ELIZA WHITE, Niece, single, white, age 28, born in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in MS. 1880 U.S. Federal Census. Census Place: Beat 5, Wilkinson County, Mississippi. Family History Library Film: 1254669. NA Film No. T9-0669. Page No. 565A. ALEXANDER P. LEAKE was born in Jan 1827, in Wilkinson, Mississippi. He died on 19 Aug 1900. He married LUCY UNKNOWN. Lucy was born in 1836, in Missouri. 1880 U.S. Federal Census. ALEXANDER (ALEX) P. LEAKE/LEEK, age 53, head, Farmer, born Jan 1827, in [Wilkinson], Mississippi. He died on 19 Aug 1900. Father born in SC. Mother born in MS. Alex was the son of FREDERICK A. LEAKE and MARY ANN RABB.[408] LUCY LEAKE, age 44, wife, Housekeeper, born 1836, in Missouri. Father born in NC. Mother born in Missouri. Race: White. Spouse: ALEX P. LEAKE.

 

Children of ALEXANDER P. LEAKE and LUCY UNKNOWN:

 

(i)    HARDY LEAKE, age 18, son, Farm Laborer, born 1862, in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in Missouri.[409]

(ii)   WILLIAM LEAKE, age 16, son, Farm Laborer, born in MS. Father born 1864, in MS. Mother born in Missouri.[410]

(iii)  CARROL LEAKE, age 14, son, At School, born in MS. Father born 1866, in MS. Mother born in Missouri.[411]

(iv)  EMANUEL LEAKE, age 2, son, born 1878, in MS. Father born in MS. Mother born in Missouri.[412]

(v)   ELIZA WHITE, age 28, niece, Boarder, born 1852, in MS. Both parents born in MS.[413]

 

VI.          JOHN LEAKE in Wilkinson County, MS.

VII.       AMANDA ELIZABETH LEAKE in Wilkinson County, MS.

VIII.     AMANDA ANN OR ANN LEAKE in Wilkinson County, MS.

 

C.    WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK was born in 1786 in [Hamlet, Richmond Co.], North Carolina.[414] WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK was born 1786, in [Rockingham, Richmond County], North Carolina.[415] WILLIAM PICKETT LEAKE was born in 1784/86, in [Rockingham, Richmond County], North Carolina. He died 31 Aug 1827 (before 1884), in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. He married ANN POYTHRESS WALL on 18 Dec 1806,[416] in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina. Ann was born 02 Aug 1786 in [Rockingham, Richmond County], North Carolina. Ann died 08 Aug 1856, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.[417]

WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK was born in 1786, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.[418] He married ANN POYTHRESS WALL on 18 Dec 1806, in Rockingham, NC.[419] Ann was born on 02 Aug 1786, in NC.[420] She died on 31 Aug 1827, in Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina.[421] He died on 28 Apr 1879, in [Rockingham, Richmond County, North Carolina]. His parents were WALTER LEAKE (1761‑1844) and HANNAH PICKETT (1766-1809). His grandparents were WILLIAM LEAKE (1731‑1797) who served in Capt John Mark's Company of Virginia, and JUDITH MOSLEY. HANNAH PICKETT was the daughter of MAJOR (AND SHERIFF) WILLIAM PICKETT and second wife, MRS. MOURNING RAILFORD, widow of WILLIAM ROBARD. WILLIAM P. represented Anson County in the state legislature many years. In addition to WALTER RALEIGH LEAK, WILLIAM P. and ANN had other children, including COL. JOHN WALL LEAKE (b 1817) and JAMES A. LEAKE (born circa 1830); there were probably other children. WILLIAM P. LEAK had several siblings including SALLY LEAKE, (1788‑1873) who married REV. WILLIAM TERRY (1774‑1827). WILLIAM PICKETT LEAKE was born in 1786, in [Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC]. He married ANN POYTHRESS WALL, in [Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC]. The Leak-Wall House, built in 1854, still stands.[422] Richmond County was formed from Anson in October 1779.[423]

 

1802. DBG-291. JAMES SMITH (LR), to SYLVESTER CHUNN for 100 pounds lawful money, tract of land, originally granted to TILMAN HELM, waters of Buffalo Creek, line of SQUIRE ROBINSONS where white oak formerly stood, corner ROBINSON’s land, Indian graves, THOMAS MEGGINSON’s line containing 100 acres. 18 November 1802. Signed: JAMES SMITH. Witnesses: BENJAMIN SMITH, CHARLES SMITH. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 – 28 Apr 1879.]

 

1807. DBG-306. JOHN and CHARLES SMITH to ARTHUR ROBINSON all of Richmond County, NC. for eight hundred dollars, parcel of land east side of Little River, corner of JAMES SMITH’s fence, to JOHN SMITH’s line, CHARLES SMITH’s line, to the CANAL,  THOMAS MEGGINSON’s line, SYLVESTER CHUNN’s corner, Little Buffalo Creek, containing 440 acres. 19 October 1807. Signed: JOHN SMITH, CHARLES SMITH. Witnesses: JAMES SMITH, MURRY ROBINSON. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 – 28 Apr 1879.]

 

1807. DBH-143. JAMES SMITH (LR) to GEORGE SLAUGHTER, a parcel of land near OWEN SLAUGHTER SR.’s land containing ten acres more or less. 17 April 1807. Signed: JAMES SMITH. Witnessed: JAMES MEACHUM, JOHN BILLINGSLEY. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 - 28 Apr 1879.]

 

1807. DBG-338. BENJAMIN SMITH of Richmond County NC, to BENJAMIN COX of Randolph County, NC for fifty pounds, parcel of land on waters of PeeDee, containing 130 acres, chestnut oak, LEAK’s Mountain [WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR.] to LINDLEY’s  line. 13 December 1807. Signed: BENJAMIN SMITH. Witnesses: JAMES N. SMITH, JOHN SMITH. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 - 28 Apr 1879.]

 

 

1808. DBG-332. JAMES SMITH, JR. to ISAAC LINDSEY both of Richmond County, NC for fifty dollars, parcel of land beginning at black jack, chestnut oak, TERRY’s  corner, three mile branch, sweet gum, white oak, Spanish oak, to ZEBULON SLAUGHTERS, 150 acres surveyed to said SMITH, from Little River to SLAUGHTER’s mill to LINDSEY’s line near point bank branch near LEAK’s Mountain [WALTER FRANCIS LEAK, SR.] containing one hundred thirty acres. 2 January 1808. Signed: JAMES SMITH. Witnesses: C.A. SMITH, JOHN LINDSEY. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786‑28 Apr 1879.]

 

1808. DBH-121. JAMES SMITH, (LR) to OWEN SLAUGHTER (PREACHER) both of Richmond County, NC for $150,  tract of land on the drains of Mountain Creek, OWEN SLAUGHTER’s on ford of Little River at SLAUGHTER’s mill, and SLAUGHTER’s CORNER to ZEBULON SLAUGHTER’s line, to big branch and CARTER’s line containing three hundred acres.  31 October 1808. Signed: JAMES SMITH. Witnesses: JOHN BILLINGSLEY, SR., C. A. SMITH. Testator: WM. P. LEAK. [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 - 28 Apr 1879.]

 

1809. DBH-111. JAMES SMITH (LR) to JAMES MOORHEAD both of Richmond County NC for $300, tract of land including plantation on Mountain Creek that JOHN ROPER sold to said JAMES SMITH (LR) runs to PANKY’s corner, STROTHER’s line, SLAUGHTER’s corner, approximately 250 acres. 20 April 1809. Signed : JAMES SMITH. Witnessed: DANIEL THOMAS, ANN THOMAS. Testator: WM. P. LEAK.[424] [WILLIAM PICKETT LEAK, 1786 - 28 Apr 1879.]

 

Children of WILLIAM PICKETT LEAKE and ANN POYTHRESS WALL:

 

(a)   ALEXANDER L. LEAKE was born in 1808, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC. [425]

(b)   ELIZA ANN LEAKE was born in 1809, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC. [426]

(c)   WALTER RALEIGH LEAKE was born on 15 Jan 1811, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., North Carolina. He died on 03 May 1859, in Little Rock Co., AR. He was buried at Eastview Cemetery, in Wadesboro, NC. His residence in 1850 was Wadesboro, Anson County, NC. Occupation: Banker. Notes: Established the old Bank of Wadesboro in 1852 & served as its president. Was living in Anson County in 1850; occupation listed as farmer. He married JULIA B. RICHARDSON in Anson Co., NC. Julia was born on 17 Sep 1814, in [Anson Co., NC.][427],[428],[429],[430] Note: There is much info on Walter in the following book. Source: Ancestry.com. Mississippi History, 1925 [database online]. Provo, Utah: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2004. Original data: Rowland, Dunbar. History of Mississippi: The Heart of the South. Volumes I‑II. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing, 1925.] Page 473. “The Heart of the South.” Territorial Judges of Mississippi, 1798-1817. “Walter Leake, of Virginia, commissioned March 2, 1807.” Walter was the son of WILLIAM PICKETT LEAKE and ANN POYTHRESS WALL. History of North Carolina. Spartanburg, S.C., Reprint Co. [1973 c1919]. 3 v. illus. 22 cm. ISBN: 0871521334 (v. 1). LC Classification: F254 .H67 1973.

 

(d)   MARTHA WALL LEAKE was born in 10 OCT 1813, in Anson or Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC. She married WILLIAM LEDBETTER on 16 Dec 1830,[431] in Anson Co., NC. He was born in 1793 in Anson Co., NC. He died 17 Dec 1857, in Anson Co., NC. She died 06 Sep 1850,[432] in [Anson Co.], North Carolina. William was the son of HENRY LEDBETTER and MARY JOHNSTON.[433],[434]

 

(e)   JOHN WALL LEAKE was born in 1816, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.[435] COLONEL JOHN WALL LEAKE was born on 13 Mar 1816, in [Rockingham], Richmond County, North Carolina. He married ANNE COLE LEAKE in [Rockingham], Richmond County, North Carolina. Ann was born on 19 Sep 1819, in [Rockingham], Richmond Co., NC. Ann died on 09 Jul 1895, in [Rockingham], Richmond Co., NC. Ann was buried at Leak-Covington Cemetery, Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC. Ann was the daughter of WALTER FRANCIS LEAKE and MARY COLE. Walter was born on 26 Mar 1799, in [Rockingham], Richmond Co., NC. Mary was born on 17 Jun 1799, in [Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC].[436]

 

First Seaboard Methodist Church. During the early pastoral years, John W. Leake encountered a cancelled check made out to “myself.” Knowing that he had not been the “beneficiary” of this check, he was ready to descend on the bank in great fury for making a mistake in his account. Mrs. Leake halted him, however, when she explained that the check was made to M. Y. Self, Pastor.”[437]

Our Church - Then and Now: A History Of Seaboard Methodist Church 1880-1958. Illustration. Prepared By: The Committee On Church History Seaboard Methodist Church Seaboard, North Carolina. Printed In U.S.A. Whittet and Shepperson Richmond, Virginia

 

 

Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Southern Historical Collection. Manuscript Department. #1468. LEAK AND WALL FAMILY PAPERS Inventory.[438] Abstract: Chiefly business correspondence and accounts of John W. Leak (1816-1876), Rockingham, N.C., planter, with commission merchants; and family papers, 1877‑1897, of his son-in-law, Henry Clay Wall (1841-1899). Volumes include a record, 1833-1847, of the Rockingham Sabbath School; antebellum plantation and slave records; personal accounts; diary of H. C. Wall, 1862, in Virginia while serving in the 23rd North Carolina Regiment, C.S.A., and in 1869; diary of Fannie Leak Wall, 1869-1870; financial records, 1861-1864, for the Richmond County (N.C.) Relief Committee for the Families of Volunteers; and scrapbooks.

Leak family.

Leak, John W., 1816-1876.

Wall, Fannie Leak, fl. 1869-1870.

Wall, Henry Clay, 1841-1899.

 

Provenance: Received from Mrs. Henry C. Wall [Fannie Leak married Henry C. Wall] of Rockingham, N.C., in May 1948.

 

Chiefly bills, accounts, and scattered business letters with commission merchants and others of John Wall Leak (1816‑1876). Early papers consist of deeds and indentures from North and South Carolina, 1785-1791. There is a group of papers, 1861-1863, pertaining to the Richmond County Relief Committee for the Families of Volunteers for which John W. Leak was treasurer. These papers consist of reports to the Central Committee from District committees, general records and accounts, individual applications and receipts for aid, and statements of individual allowances. There are also papers of Ann C. Leak as administrator of her husband's estate, 1877-1878, and a copy of his will, 1876. Leak's daughter, Fannie (1847-1921) married Henry Clay Wall (1841-1899), and there are scattered family papers from them.

 

Folder 10. Volume S-1: 1833-1847, 63 pp. Rockingham Sabbath. School records and library records.

 

Folder 11. Volume S-2:  1833-1872, 150 pp. Early accounts of Stephen Wall, the estate of Martha P. Davis, and Henry C. Wall's accounts of general supplies.

 

Folder 12. Volume 3:  1839-1845, 150 pp. Miscellaneous notes; accounts; lists of slaves, 1839-1841; and farming and planting records, 1842-1845, of John W. Leak.

 

Folder 13. Volume S-4:  1843-1854, 1867, 50 pp. Day book of John W. Leak with miscellaneous accounts and farm records.

 

Folder 14. Volume 5: 1854-1856, 24 pp. Pocket account book of John W. Leak.

 

Folder 15. Volume 6:  1861-1864, 50 pp. Financial records of the Committee for the Relief of Families of Volunteers in Richmond County, N.C., John W. Leak, agent.

 

Folder 16. Volume 7:  1862, 1869, 63 pp. Journal of Henry C. Wall, Pee Dee Guards, Company D, 23rd North Carolina Regiment, with miscellaneous notes; notes on Bethel, 1862; and accounts on crop record, 1869.

 

Folder 17. Volume 8:  1867-1868, 125 pp. Pocket account book of John W. Leak.

 

Folder 18. Volume 9:  1868-1877, 128 pp. Henry C. Wall's account of receipts and disbursements as executor of the estate of Mial Wall.

 

Folder 19. Volume 10:  1869-1870, 112 pp. Diary of Fannie Leak.

 

Folder 20. Volume 11:  1872, 16 pp. Pocket account book of John W. Leak.

 

Folder 21. Volume 12:  Undated, 6 pp. Pocket account book of a few stray [Leak] accounts and lists.

 

Folder 22. Volume S-13:  1872-1874, 119 pp. "Grief Book No. 5" by Walter F. Leak (b. 1797) with philosophy, poetry, and musings addressed to his daughters, Ann C. Leak, Hannah P. Steel, and Mary C. Scales.

 

Folder 23. Volume 14:  1875, 134 pp. Ann C. Leak's scrapbook of her father Walter F. Leak's poetry.

 

Folder 24 Volume 15:  1877, 232 pp.  Comments and writings addressed to Fannie Leak Wall and her husband, Henry C. Wall, from her grandfather, Walter F. Leak.

 

Folder 25. Volume 16:  1880, 98 pp.  Album and scrapbook containing chiefly poetry from newspapers and magazines.  The name A. C. Leak appears on cover.

 

Children of COL. JOHN WALL LEAKE and ANNE COLE LEAKE:

 

(i)    MARY HUNTER LEAKE was born 13 Feb 1840, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.

(ii)   FRANCIS ANN LEAKE was born 24 May 1842, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.

(iii)  VIRGINIA LEAKE was born 15 Oct 1845, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.

(iv)  MARTHA FANNIE LEAKE was born 1847, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.

 

(f)    WILLIAM COLE LEAKE was born in 16 MAR 1818, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.[439]

(g)   HANNAH PICKETT LEAKE was born in 1820, in Rockingham, Richmond Co., NC.[440] She married EDMUND J. LILLY. He was born in 1822/23 in NC.

 

Children of EDMUND J. LILLY and HANNAH PICKETT LEAKE:

 

(i)    ANNA LEAK LILLY was born 20 Jul 1842, in Richmond, Rockingham, NC.[441]

(ii)   MARY ALICE LILLY was born 02 Jan 1845, in Richmond, Rockingham, NC.[442]

(iii)  VIRGINIA LILLY was born 1848, in Richmond, Rockingham