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Descendants of Anthony DeTipton


72. BENJAMIN18 TIPTON (JOHN17, JONATHAN16, JONATHON15, EDWARD14, RICHARD13, RICHARD12, EDWARD11, THOMAS10, WILLIAM9, JOHN8, WILLIAM7, JOHN B.6, WILLIAM5, ROGER4, PETER3 DE TIPTON, ANTHONY2 TIPTON, ANTHONY1 DETIPTON) was born 1755 in Shenandoah Co., VA, and died February 1807 in Blount Co., TN. He married (1) ? STARRET Abt. 1776 in VA. She was born Abt. 1756 in VA, and died Abt. 1780 in VA. He married (2) REBECCA RAY Abt. 1780 in Rockbridge Co., VA. She was born Abt. 1760 in VA, and died Abt. 1794 in Blount Co., TN. He married (3) REBECCA CUSICK December 19, 1795 in Blount Co., TN, daughter of JOHN CUSICK and MARTHA BLACK. She was born Abt. 1779 in Washington, VA, and died Abt. 1850 in Alabama.

Notes for B
ENJAMIN TIPTON:
Benjamin Tipton served in the Revolutionary War first as an Ensign in 1778 and later as a Lt. of the Militia of Shenandoah


Benjamin is probably the least written about son of Col. John Tipton and Mary Butler.

He is buried at the Ellejoy Cemetery in Blount Co., TN along with many of his descendants.

The three marriages of Benjamin were listed in a ledger of his ggggrandson, Aaron Tipton. More research is needed to find out the first name of Benjamin's first wife.


More About B
ENJAMIN TIPTON:
Burial: Unknown, Ellejoy Cemetery, , Blount, Tennessee
Military service: Abt. 1778, Revolutionary War, Virginia
Misc.: DAR Patriot Index
Residence: Blount Co., TN

More About R
EBECCA RAY:
Burial: Unknown, Tennessee
     
Children of B
ENJAMIN TIPTON and ? STARRET are:
176. i.   JOSEPH B.19 TIPTON, b. Abt. 1771, Shenandoah Co., VA; d. December 29, 1857, Blount Co., TN.
177. ii.   JOHN BUTLER TIPTON, d. Unknown.
     
Children of BENJAMIN TIPTON and REBECCA RAY are:
178. iii.   SALLY SARAH19 TIPTON, b. Abt. 1781, Shenandoah Co., VA; d. Unknown.
  iv.   JACOB TIPTON, b. Abt. 1785, Blount Co., TN; d. Abt. 1885.
179. v.   BENJAMIN TIPTON, b. Abt. 1787, Blount Co., TN; d. 1879, Sevier, TN.
180. vi.   JOHN BUTLER TIPTON, b. February 25, 1789, Blount Co., TN; d. November 23, 1871, Blount Co., TN.
     
Children of BENJAMIN TIPTON and REBECCA CUSICK are:
  vii.   ELIZABETH19 TIPTON, b. Abt. 1796, Blount Co., TN; d. Unknown; m. JOHN LEWELLEN; d. Unknown.
181. viii.   SAMUEL TIPTON, b. Abt. 1797, Blount Co., TN; d. Abt. 1847, Jackson, Alabama.
  ix.   LAVINIA TIPTON, b. Abt. 1798, Blount Co., TN; d. Unknown; m. JOHN KIRBY, Abt. 1828, Alabama; b. Abt. 1798; d. Abt. 1868, Jackson Co., Alabama.
182. x.   DAVID BUTLER TIPTON, b. Abt. 1800, Blount Co., TN; d. 1870, Jackson, Alabama.
183. xi.   VANCE BUSH TIPTON, b. 1803, Blount Co., TN; d. September 19, 1879, Jackson, Alabama.
  xii.   MARTHA PATSY TIPTON, b. Abt. 1804, Blount Co., TN; d. Abt. 1810, Blount Co., TN.


73. ABRAHAM18 TIPTON (JOHN17, JONATHAN16, JONATHON15, EDWARD14, RICHARD13, RICHARD12, EDWARD11, THOMAS10, WILLIAM9, JOHN8, WILLIAM7, JOHN B.6, WILLIAM5, ROGER4, PETER3 DE TIPTON, ANTHONY2 TIPTON, ANTHONY1 DETIPTON) was born September 13, 1761 in Cedar Creek, Shenandoah Co., VA, and died September 02, 1781 in Louisville, KY.

Notes for A
BRAHAM TIPTON:
Abraham B. Tipton was born February 13, 1761. He was the twin brother of William. On November 27, 1776 he became a 2nd. Lt. with the 12th Virginia Regiment. he also served as a Captain of a Virginia Regiment. On March 16, 1878 he resigned. He then served under George Roers Clark with the Illinois Brigade. He was awarded 4000 acres at some time during his service. According to History of Shenandoah County Virginia VA records, Abraham was killed near Louisville, Va. (Ky) on September 2, 1782.. All of this information was obtained from Broderbund Vo. three, tree #6002.

This was Capt. Abraham Tipton killed by the Shawnee Indians near the falls of Ohio, in October 1782. Also served in the Revolutionary war. Abraham was the twin brother of William (Fighting Billy) Tipton

Abraham was a Captain in the 12th Virginia regiment. He was killed near Present-day Louisville, Kentucky on an expedition in 1782. - from The Heritage of Toe River Valley, Volume 1, 1994, Article #651 - The Tipton Family, page 428


     
Children of A
BRAHAM TIPTON are:
184. i.   ABRAHAM HITER BORING19 TIPTON, b. 1811, Carter Co., TN; d. September 13, 1885, Coryell Co., TX.
185. ii.   JACOB JACKSON TIPTON, b. Abt. 1815, Washington Co., TN; d. January 28, 1905, Texas.
186. iii.   ANNE COOK TIPTON, b. October 06, 1808, Green, TN; d. October 27, 1880, Oroville, Butte Co., CA.
187. iv.   CATHERINE BORING TIPTON, b. 1809, Washington Co., TN; d. Unknown.


74. WILLIAM18 TIPTON (JOHN17, JONATHAN16, JONATHON15, EDWARD14, RICHARD13, RICHARD12, EDWARD11, THOMAS10, WILLIAM9, JOHN8, WILLIAM7, JOHN B.6, WILLIAM5, ROGER4, PETER3 DE TIPTON, ANTHONY2 TIPTON, ANTHONY1 DETIPTON) was born September 13, 1761 in Cedar Creek, Shenandoah Co., VA, and died November 03, 1849 in Blount Co., TN. He married (1) PHOEBE MOORE 1781, daughter of MARTHA MARY DENTON. She was born Abt. 1760 in Shenandoah Co., VA, and died Abt. 1840 in Blount Co., TN. He married (2) ELIZABETH MCCOLEY December 23, 1789 in Shenandoah, VA. She died Unknown.

Notes for W
ILLIAM TIPTON:
William (Fighting Billy) Tipton. Twin Brother of Capt. Abraham Tipton

William Tipton's Will

In the name of God Amen. I William Tipton of the County of Blount in the State of Tennessee, being weak in body, but of sound and disposing mind and memory, and understanding,-considering the certainty of death and uncertainty of the time thereof, and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs, and thereby be the better prepared to leave this world when it shall please God to call me home, do therefore make and publish this my last Will and Testament, in manner and form following, to wit.

First and principally, I commit my soul into the hands of almighty God, and my body to the earth, to be buried in a Christian manner at the discretion of my Executor. And, thereafter my debts and funeral charges are paid, I devise and bequeath as follows:

Item 1. I give and devise unto Samuel Tipton, son of Isaac Tipton, J. W. H. Tipton, son of Jonathan Tipton, dec'd, and Isaac Tipton, son of Jacob Tipton, a certain tract or parcel of land containing 1265 acres, known as the Iron Works tract in Cade's Cove & Count of Blount.

Item 2. I give and devise, if not disposed of prior to my death, twenty acres of land lying and adjoining the lands of John Singleton, dec'd & James Freeman, dec'd, to Isaac Tipton, son of Jacob Tipton and also 7 1/2 acres of land known as Scott's Island to said Isaac Tipton.

Item 3. I will the tract of land in Cade's Cove, containing 500 acres, known as Potato Branch Tract to be sold by my Executors to the best advantage, the proceeds of which tract to be appointed as hereinafter named.

Item 4. I will that the tract of land known as the Rich Gap survey be sold by my Executors to this will and the proceeds appropriated as hereinafter named.

Item 5. I will and devise to my grandson Samuel Tipton, son of Isaac Tipton, a negro named Joe, now by my property, to have and to hold as his property for life.

Item 6. I give and devise unto my daughter Martha Hart and her heirs, a negro woman named Lint, to have and to hold as her and their property for life.

Item 7. I will that all my farm stock and farming implements and all my household and kitchen furniture be sold by my Executors herein named and the proceeds thereof be appropriated as herein after named.

Item 8. I will that in addition to the negro man Joe, Samuel Tipton have one hundred dollars jointly with Isaac Tipton son of Jacob Tipton for the purpose of erecting a neat monument of building over the grave of myself, my wife, my son Jonathan and his wife and William Tipton son of Jacob Tipton.

Item 9. I will that after my debts are paid out of the proceeds of the estate, the amount that may remain, if any, be appropriated as follows: Namely. the proceeds of the several tracts of land herein named, not otherwise devised & bequeathed, with all the proceeds arising from the sale of my personal estate, be equally divided to & between Ann Stephens, widow of John Stephens, Calvin Stephens, Abraham Tipton, son of Isaac, William Tipton, son of Jonathan & Samuel Tipton, son of Isaac, and lastly, I do hereby constitue and appoint Issac Hart and Samuel Tipton son of Isaac Tipton to be sole Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, revolking and annulling all former wills by me heretofore made, ratifying and confirming this, and none other to be my last Will and Testament.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 21st day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty eight.

his
William X Tipton sec (Seal)
mark
Signed, sealed & acknowledged
in th presence of us,
James Haddox)
Joseph Kirby) witnesses

Will Book #1 p. 197
Blount Co,. Tennessee

Sources: Photocopy of Will from Gem Misenar
"We Tiptons and Our Kin" by Rev. Ervin C. Tipton pp. 648-649[tipton.FTW]


William married his step-sister, Phoebe.

William was a Revolutionary War Captain, and received three wounds at Savannah in 1779.
- from The Heritage of Toe River Valley, Volume 1, 1994, Article #651 - The Tipton Family, page 428


Cades Cove: A Brief History
Within an hour's drive from Knoxville, Tennesseeby way of Highway 321 (old Highway 73) is one of nature's choicest spots. Cades Cove is one of the largest, and by far the most interesting, coves within the bounds of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It is reached by following the natural meanders of a beautiful mountain stream for several miles until the road leaves the stream and climbs to enter Cades Cove, which lies imbedded in the midst of surrounding mountains. The elevation is 807 feet higher than Tuckaleechee Cove, which you have just left.

The cove stretches five miles in length and two miles in width and is completely hemmed in by mountains. As you wind along the modern highway into the cove, you might well wonder how the first man found this secluded spot and how the first settlers managed to get their families and belongings over the rugged mountains into this place.

The first reference to Cades Cove is in 1809 when John Smith and William Crowson petitioned the state of Tennessee for entry rights to lands in Cades Cove to which they held North Carolina land grants. In the same year, Hugh Dunlap, an attorney in Knoxville, was issued a grant by the state of Tennessee based on his claim that he held a North Caroline land grant issued in 1794 for 5,000 acres in Cades Cove which had been mislaid, and the record lost from the Secretary's office (North Carolina). The grant was issued with the proviso that it should interfere with no occupant right or school reservation.

In 1820, Aaron Crowson, in a petition to the Tennessee legislature, stated that his father, William Crowson and a Mr. James Ross, had both possessed "the right of preemption and occupancy" to a tract of land in Cades Cove on the 6th day of February 1796.

The first Tennessee grant to land in Cades Cove was registered March 23, 1821 in the name of William Tipton for 640 acres in Cades Cove as assignee of Aaron Crowson.

William Tipton was a revolutionary soldier who came to Cades Cove from Carter County, Tennessee. He was soon surrounded by relatives and friends from Carter County. Among those to whom he sold land was his brother Thomas and Thomas's son-in-law, Joshua Job; his daughter, Martha hart; his sons Jacob and Isaac; Thomas Jones and others. Peter and Daniel Cable, Robert Burchfield, James Sparks, and Richard and William Davis are all mentioned as being in the cove before 1830. In fact, you can find their family names on the tombstones in the cemetery in Cades Cove.

Although we are sure there were people in the cove before 1819we have reference to two Carolina land grants prior to organization of the state of Tennesseethis was Cherokee land and it was not legal for settlers to be there until after the Treaty of 1819.

The best description of life and times in the Cades Cove comes from the memoirs of Dr. Abraham Job, which he wrote after he was seventy-five years old.

"My father, Joshua Job, and my mother, Ruth Tipton, were of Virginia stock. Their fathers, David Job and Thomas Tipton, moved from Shenandoah Valley, Virginia shortly before the Revolutionary War....

In 1821, when I was about four years old, he bought 640 acres of fine land in Cades Cove Tennessee, and moved to it....

Many of our relations and friends also moved to Cades Cove; on account of the fertility of the soil, the superior advantages of raising stock, etc. The Cherokee Indians who had been such a terror to the settlement of the Wautauga Valley, and surrounding county, causing the settlers to live in forts for safety, were still lingering in small bands, in the mountain fastnesses along the range of the Smoky Mountains, which lie immediately south of Cades Cove, and form part of its boundary....

My father and relatives from Carter County were among the first settlers in this part of Blount County. And among them was my mother's brother, Jacob Tipton, and his wife and two children, Jacob and Nancy....

My uncle went out hunting one day and did not return that night and when search was made for him next day, he was found in a deserted Indian camp...where he had been murdered by the Indians....

The land when we lived there was very rich and fertile, and produced abundant crops, of everything that could be raised in that climate; but corn was the principle crop. This crop was raised to such an extent after we moved there that I saw corn sell at six cents a bushel, because there was no market for it....

I was now old enough to go to school. Educational facilities at that day (about 1825) were not very good, especially in such out of the way places as Cades Cove. What schools we had that day were of the most primitive order. At the 'old field schools' as they were called, we had no recess as it is now called. It was study from morning til noon, then an hour for playtime and study from 1 o'clock til turning out time....

My father cleared up a considerable amount of his 640 acres of land in the cove, and raised a good deal of stock; but after trying it for 10 years, he got dissatisfied because he was so hemmed in by the mountains.

No fruit trees had been planted when we settled in the cove, and for several years we had to get all the fruit we used from Uncle Billy Scott's in Tuckaleechee Cove six miles away. It was two or three years before we had mills suitable to make flour, the only mills we had were tubmills to crack corn. Father built a mill soon after we moved there, but it was seldom one saw wheat bread on any table there.

Game was very plentiful; such as bear, deer, and all smaller animals in great abundance....

About the year 1830 the government of the United States purchased from the Cherokees all their lands lying between the Hiwassee River in Tennessee and the Chattahoochee River in Georgia. It was this purchase that my father moved in the spring of 1830 or '31. He sold his farm in the cove to James Henry who lived on Little River in Blount County. About the same time William Henry, son of James Henry, married my sister, and moved into the same house that Father vacated when we moved to the Cherokee Nation in Georgia".

The early 1830s saw a general migration of all those who were dissatisfied with life in Cades Cove into North Georgia. This migration continued into the 1840s. Some families returned to the coves while others moved back and forth with the seasons. The same was true of the other coves. William Davis settled in Walker County, Georgia. A visit to old cemeteries in Catoosa, Walker , and Murray Counties, Georgia will show a surprising number of the same names as those in Cades Cove.


William "Fighting Billy", the fourth child and fourth son Col. John and Mary Butler Tipton was born in what was to become Shenandoah Co.Va. 2/13/1761. He was a fourth generation American; he fought in the American Revolution,(along with his father and four of his brothers) was wounded at Savanna Ga. After the war he married his step sister Phoebe Moore. William and Phoebe were the parents of 10 children. Four Girls and six boys. Four of the six boys fought in the War of 1812. William and Phoebe lived in Blount Co. near the Blount/Knox county line. He died 11/3/1849 and is buried in a private cemetery (near the Blount/Knoxville Highway overlooking the river) that I believe was part of his farm.

"William C. Tipton, JP, State of Tennessee. On 23d April 1844, Mr. William Tipton, aged 83 years, that he is acquainted with Mrs. Mary Denton and husband John Denton. Affiant was married himself in 1781 and well recalls that the marriage of John and Mary Denton took place the following year, 1782. William (X) Tipton."
William was in Capt. Wall's Company, Col. Richard Parker's regiment and
received three wounds at Savannah in 1779.


---------------------------------------------------------
This info came to me from an unknown source
The first Tennessee grant to land in Cades Cove was registered March 23, 1821 in the name of William Tipton for 640 acres in Cades Cove as assignee of Aaron Crowson. William Tipton was a revolutionary soldier who came to Cades Cove from Carter County, Tennessee. He was soon surrounded by relatives and friends from Carter County. Among those to whom he sold land was his brother Thomas and Thomas's son-in-law, Joshua Job; his daughter, Martha hart; his sons Jacob and Isaac; Thomas Jones and others. Peter and Daniel Cable, Robert Burchfield, James Sparks, and Richard and William Davis are all mentioned as being in the cove before 1830. In fact, you can find their family names on the tombstones in the cemetery in Cades Cove. Although we are sure there were people in the cove before 1819-we have reference to two Carolina land grants prior to organization of the state of Tennessee-this was Cherokee land and it was not legal for settlers to be there until after the Treaty of 1819.

Cades Cove History:

Europeans first settled Cades Cove in 1818. Most migrated from the Watauga Settlement in northeast Tennessee. Before their arrival, Cades Cove was part of the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee called the cove Tsiyahi, "place of the river otter." In addition to river otters, elk and bison lived in the Cove. Hunters extirpated them before settlement. The Cherokee never lived in the Cove, but they used it as a summer hunting ground. Arrowheads are common throughout the Cove. Before the American Revolution, the Cherokee discouraged settlers. After the defeat of their English allies, they sought peace. Most Cherokees accepted this peace and the new United States government. They tried to integrate European technologies and culture with their own. The Cherokee adapted well. They built modern houses, attended school, and by 1820 they created a written language. The 1830 U.S. census showed more than 1,000 slaves working on Cherokee plantations. Despite the Cherokee's assimilation, many Americans wanted to move all Indians west of the Mississippi River. The discovery of gold on Cherokee lands, and Andrew Jackson's rise to the Presidency, led to their removal and the tragic "Trail of Tears." More than 14,000 Cherokees left the Southern Appalachians in 1838. Winter cold, disease, despair, and the United States Army escorted the Cherokees west. Less than 10,000 reached Oklahoma. A few Cherokees refused to move. They hid among the Smoky Mountain wilderness, avoiding the army and local authorities. In 1870s, the U.S. government allowed these renegade Cherokees, now called the Eastern Band, to claim some of their lands in western North Carolina. This is the Qualla boundary. Cherokee removal opened Cades Cove and surrounding areas for settlement without fear of Indian harassment. In 1850 the Cove's population reached 685. Settlers farmed the fertile limestone-based soils and searched for valuable minerals. While crops grew abundantly, the mineral wealth never materialized. The Civil War shattered Cades Cove. No slave ever worked the Cove, and the mountain people shared few cultural ties with the South. Still young men fought for both sides, 21 for the Union and 12 for the Confederates. Most remaining residents were pro-Union, but surrounded by hostile territory, they paid for their northern sympathies. From 1862-1864, a Confederate regiment, Thomas' Legion, terrorized the Cove by stealing livestock, harassing children, and taking prisoners. Small children guarded the mountain tops, blowing horns when the Confederates approached. The story of Russell Gregory and his son Charles best portrays East Tennessee's bitter Civil War divisions. Russell had strong Union sentiments, but was too old to fight. His son Charles supported the Confederates, and joined Thomas' Legion in 1862. Russell, upset at the continuing raids, organized an ambush. The Cove's remaining men surprised the Confederates, forcing a retreat. One of the Confederates was Charles Gregory. He recognized his father's gun when it fired the first shot. Charles retreated with his comrades, informing them that his father led the ambush. The Confederates returned later that night, and Charles pointed out his father's home. Charles did not realize the revenge his fellows had in mind. After Charles pointed out the house, the soldiers dragged Russell out, and killed him on the spot. Russell became a martyr, giving his life for the Cove's people. His tombstone epithet reads "Russell Gregory, murdered by North Carolina rebels." Charles eventually received forgiveness. His grave lies behind his father's in the Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery. The Civil War changed the Cove's culture. Ravaged by the Confederates, and abandoned by the Union, the people of Cades Cove no longer trusted or welcomed outsiders. The Cove turned inward, developing a fierce independence. Immigration stopped. Without new blood, the residents intermarried. By 1900, most of the Cove's 700 residents were relations. Around 1900, logging concerns discovered the Smoky Mountains. During the next 30 years, they clearcut 67% of the future Park. Logging brought employment and hard currency to the mountaineers, but destroyed the environment. In the early 1920s the Park movement began. In Cades Cove, more than half the residents accepted the cash offered for their land. The others fought the Park movement. John W. Oliver, great-grandson of Cades Cove's first settler, led the effort. His spirited fight against Tennessee's state government ended in the State's Supreme Court. A compromise allowed the Cove people to remain in their homes with a life-time lease.


More About W
ILLIAM TIPTON:
Burial: Unknown, Cades Cove Cemetary, Blount, TN
Military service: Private, Revolutionary War, Virginia

More About P
HOEBE MOORE:
Burial: Unknown, Cades Cove Cemetary, Blount, TN
     
Children of W
ILLIAM TIPTON and PHOEBE MOORE are:
188. i.   ABRAHAM BUTLER19 TIPTON, b. November 03, 1783, Shenandoah Co., VA; d. November 15, 1831, Knox, TN.
189. ii.   CAPTAIN REUBEN TIPTON, b. February 1782, Shenandoah Co., VA; d. Abt. 1837, Knox, TN.
190. iii.   MARY POLLY TIPTON, b. Abt. 1784, Greene, TN; d. Unknown.
  iv.   MARTHA TIPTON, b. Abt. 1789, Knox, TN; d. Unknown, Kansas; m. (1) REUBEN RODDY, Abt. 1807; b. Abt. 1785; d. Abt. 1821, Blount Co., TN; m. (2) ISAAC HART, October 09, 1821, Tennessee; b. 1794, Tennessee; d. Unknown.
191. v.   ISAAC TIPTON, b. 1791, Knox, TN; d. 1845, Knox, TN.
192. vi.   JACOB T. TIPTON, b. Abt. 1792, Cades Cove Cemetary, Blount, TN; d. Abt. 1860, Knox, TN.
193. vii.   JONATHAN R. TIPTON, b. January 01, 1796, Knox, TN; d. March 16, 1840, Blount Co., TN.
194. viii.   DAVID BUTLER TIPTON, b. May 04, 1799, Blount, TN; d. August 1863, Curran Township, Sangamon, Illinois.
  ix.   ANN TIPTON, b. Abt. 1803, Blount Co., TN; d. Unknown; m. CAPTAIN JOHN STEPHENS, November 27, 1831, Blount Co., TN; b. Abt. 1790, Tennessee; d. Abt. 1848, Blount Co., TN.
  x.   LAVINIA TIPTON, b. 1803, Blount Co., TN; d. Unknown; m. JOHN DENTON, October 13, 1825, Blount Co., TN; b. Bet. 1797 - 1800; d. 1875, Walker, GA.
  Notes for JOHN DENTON:
John shot and killed his brother-in-law, Jonathan R. Tipton. John was arrested, then escaped. He ran off to evade trial.



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